Leftys

Are there pitches that r better trown depending on which hand you throw with, or are all left handed throws better then all rights?

All lefties are freaks. :smiley: :smiley: Theres a lefty on my team who’s 2-seam moves less than his 4-seam. He wans’t hitting good so switched over to right handed one game and hit a 2 RBI single. He’s a freak.

Just kidding of course. Not.

If both of your arms and hands are the same size and length, why would it make a difference? And what makes lefties better?

I don’t know what it is in higher leagues but I know that its a general rule if you have 2 pitchers with exately the same stuff righty and lefty you take the lefty. But then also if theres a majority righty batters it’d be nice to have righty righty. But you have to consider that people aren’t used to seeing lefties compared to righties.

The difference between righties and lefties are that lefties don’t need to learn to efficiently throw the ball (hard). They just need to learn control.

But the question was regarding “certain pitches”. If your left hand/arm is the same as your right then it makes no difference what pitch you are throwing.

Lets say if you were 100% ambidextrous and have the same exact mechanics throwing using either arm, I guarantee you that there will be no difference which arm you throw with. The pitches will mirror each other’s movement. Why would it be any different?

If there is a difference, it is not in which hand you throw with. The difference is in the arm action. Pat Venditte has different mechanics from each side that he throws from. This of course creates different movement on his pitches between his left and right side.

xv84,

As a general rule, left handed pitchers can get away with throwing the ball 5 miles slower than right handed pitchers. This is due mainly because being left-handed, the pitch is coming at the batter from an unusual angle. Since Left-handed pitchers are uncommon, this is hard for batters (left and right handed) to adjust to them. I am left-handed and remember having a great deal of difficulty seeing a pitch from a left hander who threw almost side-arm.

As far as the differences in pitches, this depends mainly on the natural movement of the pitcher. If the pitcher has a lot of movement, this could have a major impact. Generally, you see the biggest movement on pitches like sliders. For a left hander, this will cut into a right hander batter and for a right hander, it will cut away from the right handed batter. As for the other pitches it depends a lot on the grip and what type of pronation or supination of your forearm and hand.

Hope this helps,
Jack Elliott

www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com

[quote=“Jack Elliott”]xv84,

As a general rule, left handed pitchers can get away with throwing the ball 5 miles slower than right handed pitchers. This is due mainly because being left-handed, the pitch is coming at the batter from an unusual angle. Since Left-handed pitchers are uncommon, this is hard for batters (left and right handed) to adjust to them. I am left-handed and remember having a great deal of difficulty seeing a pitch from a left hander who threw almost side-arm.

As far as the differences in pitches, this depends mainly on the natural movement of the pitcher. If the pitcher has a lot of movement, this could have a major impact. Generally, you see the biggest movement on pitches like sliders. For a left hander, this will cut into a right hander batter and for a right hander, it will cut away from the right handed batter. As for the other pitches it depends a lot on the grip and what type of pronation or supination of your forearm and hand.

Hope this helps,
Jack Elliott

www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com
[/quote]

So wat your saying is that I should focus more on a slider then a curveball? Cause my slider sux, but I gotta mean curve. That sometimes curves to much.

  1. your curve ball can never curve too much you just need to find the right elevation for it.
  2. Pick your breaking pitch to what suits you best. As you said your curve is better than your slider I would focus on your curve until you get to higher levels and maybe cant get by with 3 pitches.

I am also a lefty and have completely lost the ability to throw a curve so I am using my 1/2 Change Fast punch until I can get a pitching coach to help me out. Just remember, hitting is timing and pitching is disrupting that timing.

Man I use to throw both and bat both when I was younger but my right hand developed more for throwing and my left developed more for hitting. In fact the only thing I do right handed ever is throw stuff. I do everything else left handed. However, I did use to do everything both ways, just see what side develops and feels more comfortable if the movement is the same both ways, I picked up my left handed glove last year and threw lefty almost as hard as some other people on the team, but my knuckler isn’t good left handed because I don’t have the muscle memory.

So if lefty is comfortable for you then go ahead but if righty is then go righty. That’s how I finally left being ambidextrous behind.

a slider is a devastating pitch if u are a lefty. when it slides at a righties knees its pretty scary.

[quote=“CTBlaze”]Are there pitches that r better trown depending on which hand you throw with, or are all left handed throws better then all rights?[/quote]whoa watch it hahaha, every hand is the same except lefties are said to have more natural movement on their fastball, however many righties have better sinkers than lefties so i dk :stuck_out_tongue:

The only thing that would make them better is that there arent as much of them so they are less commen and people are not used to facing them, as mmuch

only 10% of the population is lefty (i’m one). if you can get a left handed pitcher to do anything you are pretty good.

that said, a lefty has to prove he can’t pitch. most rightys (unless they are large) have to prove they can.

if you can get hitters out, you’ll get your chance.

I’m left handed and I definitely don’t throw as fast as a lot of righties I face but from my own experience my fastballs and changeups have a lot more natural movement than that of a right hander. Also, if a left hander can pound the outside corner (especially low and away) with his fastball there’s something about it that makes it harder for a righty to hit it.

It also depends on your arm slot. If you are throwing from over the top you are going to be equally effective since your fastball will “rise” and your curve will drop pretty much straight down. This is how the GREAT Sandy Koufax did it.

If you are throwing from 3/4’s or lower then the worm truly turns for you! Why? because IMHO, the biggest advantages of being a lefty facing rightys is the ability to work the outside corner of the plate with your fastball. A leftys 2 seamer thrown from 3/4’s or lower should have some serious run down and away from a right hander-same for a guy throwing a circle change. A lefty can back door a curveball with very good success and throw a screwgie for an awesome strikeout pitch especially if it spins from 11 to 5.

John Franco made a career out of turning over his circle change from the left hand side. Ian

CTBlaze,

One of the first rules of pitching is throw the pitches that you feel the most comfortable with. If you feel more comfortable throwing a curveball over a slider, you will definitely want to focus on throwing that type of pitch. By throwing pitches you feel more comfortable with, you will get better results because you will have more confidence in them.

At the high school level, location and movement matter the most. I was taught and recommend high school players learn three pitches: a fastball, changeup and one other pitch (slider, curve, sinker, etc). That is more than plenty. In fact, two pitches is actually enough at the high school level if you get your location down and have pretty good movement.

Based on what you have said, I would recommend you concentrate on developing your curveball, fastball, and changeup. Just remember for a curveball you are basically trying to do two things:
(1) Throw a curve in the strike zone when the batter is expecting a fastball (essentially freezing the batter) or
(2) Throw a curve out of the strike zone when you know the batter wants to swing (essentially causing the batter to swing and miss).

As one of the posters mentioned earlier, anything you can do to mess up the timing of the batter will benefit your pitching.

Best,
Jack Elliott

http://www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com/Baseball-Pitching/

[quote=“Jack Elliott”]CTBlaze,

One of the first rules of pitching is throw the pitches that you feel the most comfortable with. If you feel more comfortable throwing a curveball over a slider, you will definitely want to focus on throwing that type of pitch. By throwing pitches you feel more comfortable with, you will get better results because you will have more confidence in them.

At the high school level, location and movement matter the most. I was taught and recommend high school players learn three pitches: a fastball, changeup and one other pitch (slider, curve, sinker, etc). That is more than plenty. In fact, two pitches is actually enough at the high school level if you get your location down and have pretty good movement.

Based on what you have said, I would recommend you concentrate on developing your curveball, fastball, and changeup. Just remember for a curveball you are basically trying to do two things:
(1) Throw a curve in the strike zone when the batter is expecting a fastball (essentially freezing the batter) or
(2) Throw a curve out of the strike zone when you know the batter wants to swing (essentially causing the batter to swing and miss).

As one of the posters mentioned earlier, anything you can do to mess up the timing of the batter will benefit your pitching.

Best,
Jack Elliott

http://www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com/Baseball-Pitching/
[/quote]

OK, so about the timing, should I do something like fast-change? O, and wen u said about high school level needing only 3 different pitches. I can throw 5-6, which r my 2 types of fastballs(4 and 2), a circle change, 12-6 curve, natural curve, and splitter, which still needs work. So should I just drop trying to develop the splitter, or still work on it?

CTBlaze,

Yes, one common pitch sequence is to alternate speeds leading with a fastball followed by a changeup. Another common sequence is to alternate locations such as going inside and outside. For example, leading with a fastball inside followed by a fastball outside. Other sequences are dictated by the batter. For example, if he was late on your fastball. You might consider throwing another fastball closer insider or if he pulled your fastball, consider going to a slower pitch to slow down his bat and throw it outside. Bottom line: the best advice when can give you is try to get ahead in the pitch count by making your first pitch to each batter a strike. If you are able to do this, you provide yourself with all types of options in pitches and pitch sequences.

As far as pitches, I would tend to advise you to choose from among your 5 or 6 pitches and narrow it down to the ones you feel the most comfortable with. The reason for this is it gives you more practice time and repetitions to refine these pitches. By using 5 or 6 pitches, you risk spreading yourself too thin and, I would worry that it would take away from the other pitches.

Hope this helps,
Jack Elliott
Baseball Strategy
http://www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com/Baseball-Strategy/

[quote=“Jack Elliott”]CTBlaze,

Yes, one common pitch sequence is to alternate speeds leading with a fastball followed by a changeup. Another common sequence is to alternate locations such as going inside and outside. For example, leading with a fastball inside followed by a fastball outside. Other sequences are dictated by the batter. For example, if he was late on your fastball. You might consider throwing another fastball closer insider or if he pulled your fastball, consider going to a slower pitch to slow down his bat and throw it outside. Bottom line: the best advice when can give you is try to get ahead in the pitch count by making your first pitch to each batter a strike. If you are able to do this, you provide yourself with all types of options in pitches and pitch sequences.

As far as pitches, I would tend to advise you to choose from among your 5 or 6 pitches and narrow it down to the ones you feel the most comfortable with. The reason for this is it gives you more practice time and repetitions to refine these pitches. By using 5 or 6 pitches, you risk spreading yourself too thin and, I would worry that it would take away from the other pitches.

Hope this helps,
Jack Elliott
Baseball Strategy
http://www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com/Baseball-Strategy/
[/quote]

Hey, thanks for the help. I guess I should stick mostly with my Circle change, 12-6 curve, fastball(obviously), and slurve, which for some reason Ive been doing well with.