Lefty pitcher needs new pitch

I am a 6’2 210 LHP usually a starter. I throw a moving 2 seam fastball,(84-86) a changeup that breaks (78-76), sometimes a curveball but not too often maybe 10 times a game. Thats my pitch list my fastball moves enough it breaks down and away from a right handed hitter, equallying alot of ground balls. I am thinking of adding a forkball and knuckle-curve to the list, i throw my change up with the knuckle tucked in grip…

anyone think these are good pitches ??
reply if its good or bad…

why not try a cutter, to jam righties up and in?

not sure…i threw the forkball during bp a few times and it has no rotation on it. from release to the plate it will rise and then break down, its nice to watch…

If it is very distinct in it’s rotation and easily picked up on then hitters will be able to jump on it, because a fork isnt unpredictable like a knuckle, it has a constant and usually consistent break, so once they see it coming they will know exactly how to swing. Whereas a knuckle ball is quickly picked up by a hitter, but they really don’t know where it’ll go.
I’d also go with the cutter.

If your fork ball is really droping (not just falling from lack of speed) I would certainly keep it. Batters saw Bruce Sutters ( yes Sutters was a splitter-its all forkball variations to me) , Elroy Faces, Lindy McDaniels for years and chased them into the dirt never connecting. If your forkball is naturally diving when it gets to the plate BY ALL MEANS KEEP IT and perfect it. You have an out pitch in the making.

That being said, I would also keep working on your curve. This will be a big advantage when you face other left handers. Once you master it, you might also “back door” a few righties with it too.

At this point you have enough pitches. Look at Steves article. 3 Pitches guys, fastball, 2 plane breaking pitch, change-up. The Reds teach 4 pitches and add the slider-a real slider not a cutter, but that is when a guy reaches the Bigs. Unless you are a true junkballer, Thats all you need!

Guys that have 8 pitches generally are making up for a mediocore fastball, or learned to pitch that way as a style choice. Ian

i am LHP and i find that a knuckle curve (The way i throw it is like a two seam FB with the index finger curled on the seam)works very well if thrown over the top and it breaks alot.

[quote=“jake93436”]I am a 6’2 210 LHP usually a starter. I throw a moving 2 seam fastball,(84-86) a changeup that breaks (78-76), sometimes a curveball but not too often maybe 10 times a game. Thats my pitch list my fastball moves enough it breaks down and away from a right handed hitter, equallying alot of ground balls. I am thinking of adding a forkball and knuckle-curve to the list, i throw my change up with the knuckle tucked in grip…

anyone think these are good pitches ??
reply if its good or bad…[/quote]

I would consider adding a screwball. It would give you a pitch that runs down and out on righties (e.g. the same movement as a slider for a RHP).

I like the knuckle curve as well.

I agree with Chris that the screwball would be a fine complement, but the screwgie can be very hard on the arm. I would not try this one with out a pitching coach and until I was 18. If the forkball is working like the traditional forkball it should run down and away from a right handed batter.

You have enough pitches-go for command of all of them. I am not a huge believer in ultra high velocity but a few more mph on your fastball would be helpful. Gaining more bite on your curve, and perfecting your forkball would also be a big plus. If your change is fading away from righties all the better, study John Franco’s career. He was a master of running his change up away from right handers.

Start with the basic 3 pitches, the batters will let you know if you need more than that, Ian.

hey good luck trying to throw a screwball for strikes with dece movement and veleitcy.

This is a myth.

The screwball is actually one of the easiest pitches on the arm because it is thrown by powerfully pronating (rotating counter-clockwise) the forearm. Unlike as with a slider, this keeps the bones of the elbow from slamming together.

yeah- but it can be tough on the shoulder. I guess it depends on what kind of spin you are trying to get on it. If you are a righty trying to get 11-5 spin on it, it seems really tough on the shoulder, Ian.

There’s no reason why the screwball should be any harder on the shoulder than any other pitch since the spin is generated by the action of the forearm and the movement of the ball is created by the spin of the ball.

For instance, Mike Marshall was a screwballer who pitched for 16 years and could have pitched for many more. He pitched in adult leagues once he was out of baseball.

The problems that people like pitchers like Fernando Valenzuela, who occasionally threw the screwball, had were related to other things.

Cutter, Slider or Splitter. All would be grreat additions for a pitcher, especially a lefty

how old are you lefty. with your size in the mid 80’s, depending on how old you are, when you mature and gain strength you may reach the magic 90s. i would not add a pitch. i would consider throwing a sinker or possibly screwball (a sinker is a less dramatic screwball with a similar spin).

i would increase the quality of my fastball/change and curveball. the sinker is just a variation of the fastball like the cutter just the other way, and i would focus on gaining strength and command. if you can pitch backwards at mid 80s with a quality change up you are fine (ask trevor hoffman)

santana is basically a 2 pitch pitcher - he’s flip a breaking pitch up there every now and then.

concentrate on quality. a new quality pitch is hard to master and takes time.

I think the best thing would be a cutter since you lack a hard pitch to come into righties. So you could tail your fastball away againest them and then come inside with two strikes with the cutter.

SPITBALL!! just kidding. Sinker would be a great pitch to learn to get some double plays its a pitch im working on. Or you could develope a so-so knuckleball that you throw 10 times a game to get the strike out or if a batter is putting up a good battle. Dont be afraid to be catagorized at a knuckleballer just cuz u throw it a few times a game it can be a very good pitch if you throw it scarcely with even little movement on it.

Yep, you know even John Smoltz throws a knuckleball from time to time? Even if it isn’t dirty it still can get them thinking about it or throw them off balance. We have a pitcher that does that exact same thing, he’s a lefty, throws hard, has a nasty curve and a change and then throws his knuck in there a few times a game to get people off balance.

this kid jake, is basically just like me. except im 6’1" and 185.
I have the same pitches and im asking the same question

what else can i add to a 2-seamer, curve, and c-change?

how about a slider

What is the difference in release between a slider and curve? sorry it seems i dont know much, but ive always just gone out and done what works when it comes to pitching.