Leading with hips

When pitching everyone tells me to lead with my hips to build momentum but when i do this i dont have any balance at leg lift and my arm is really lagging behind. Is this a good thing and is this how it should be?

The way I just heard it explained to me was to lift your glove side leg while still maintaining balance-then (the experts can argue this fact),as you fall forward or push off with your back leg-this is the time to begin to lead with your hip. The key here is to not do it immediately while you are lifting your leg-you must gain the balance first.

While watching my son getting lessons on this-the coach asked him repeatedly to lift his leg-and hold it while keeping his balance. Then once the leg was lifted to the proper level and balance was there, he would tell him to go and we would stick his hip out and then begin the delivery forward and throw. (This is more of a muscle memory trick than anything else). Without sticking this hip out-it resists your lower body from getting into the momentum building process entirely-thus limiting your velocity.

The balance point in the entire delivery is only a split second-so don’t lift and hold too long or stop the delivery motion or then you’ll get all screwed up.

Hope this helps-good luck to you.

Bob

someone on this forum told me to start moving forward right before the legs reaches its peak so i was confused if that was the right way to do it. i guess i am going to have to work on it to get more comfortable. i am willing to work hard at it because i dont want anymore arm injuries.

[quote=“Bobbybanker”]The way I just heard it explained to me was to lift your glove side leg while still maintaining balance-then (the experts can argue this fact),as you fall forward or push off with your back leg-this is the time to begin to lead with your hip. The key here is to not do it immediately while you are lifting your leg-you must gain the balance first.

While watching my son getting lessons on this-the coach asked him repeatedly to lift his leg-and hold it while keeping his balance. Then once the leg was lifted to the proper level and balance was there, he would tell him to go and we would stick his hip out and then begin the delivery forward and throw. (This is more of a muscle memory trick than anything else). Without sticking this hip out-it resists your lower body from getting into the momentum building process entirely-thus limiting your velocity.

The balance point in the entire delivery is only a split second-so don’t lift and hold too long or stop the delivery motion or then you’ll get all screwed up.

Hope this helps-good luck to you.

Bob[/quote]
That’s the old balance point drill. A lot of coaches teach that. I admit I use to teach it. But not any more. Take a look at video clips of some of the top pitchers in the game and you’ll see that their hips are already moving forward before the peak of their knee lifts. There is no balance point reached.

I agree you should try to start moving forward right before peak of knee lift and lead with your hip through the first part of your stride. If you’re having trouble, try making a series of small adjustments instead of one big adjustment. In other words, begin by starting only very slightly before peak of knee lift. Get comfortable with that and then start a little bit sooner. Repeat this process as desired.

Also, understand that this is going to feel awkward for a while so you have to stick with it and give it a chance. If you can put it together with good mechanics and timing, and the strength and flexibility neededto support those mechanics, your arm will figure it out and keep up.

wait i am still a bit confused about staying balance. So roger from what youre saying there isn’t a balance point anymore because it slows down momentum. While doing this i notice i have much faster arm speed thats good thanks.

you might check your back (post or throwing side) foot. you may be allowing the weight to settle onto your heel or completely along the sole of your foot. try keeping the weight on the inside of the ball of this foot and it should help your balance problems. you can practice the proper position by placing your other foot in a chair or against the tire or bumper of a car with your feet spread about 1/2 and then 3/4 of your height. if you can do this and keep your shoulders behind your hips (your body will form a >) this is a good position to throw from.

If you reach the balance point, you fail to generate as much momentum as you could because you’ve waited to start moving forward. If you pause at the balance point then you also waste any momentum you’ve already created up to that point. Take a look at the video clips of Nolan Ryan and Randy Johnson in the Video Clips forum and you’ll see they never reach the balance point. That is, by the time their knee lift peaks, their hips have already shifted forward to the point it is not possible to balance.

There is balance through the stride but it’s not in a static position - it’s dynamic and controlled.

Like I said, your arm will figure it out if you give it a chance.