Labrum surgery


#1

I have just undergone surgery to repair a torn labrum. I have heard some mixed responses on what recovery for ths surgery is like. I just wanted some input from some people here. Will I ever throw like I used to??


#2

The success rate of this surgery isn’t nearly as high as with Tommy John.

What I would suggest is that you try to address the root cause of the problem rather than go back to your old, problematic mechanics.

I believe that the root cause of labrum problems is related to habitual rushing; to starting to rotate the shoulders before your forearm is up and in the high cocked position.

Do you have a video of yourself throwing?


#3

I think I originally hurt it during football of my senior year of high school. I landed on my shoulder and it poped out of socket. I’ve had a little pain in my shoulder ever since that incident. I never got it checked out because I did not expect to pitch in college( was recruted as an outfielder).

Then in college my coaches turned me into a full-time pitcher and I started throwing more than I ever had and it just made my shoulder worse. I’m not 100% sure but I do not believe that a mechanical problem caused this injury. I worked very hard this last year with my college coaches to perfect any mechanical problems I had. I do not have any video of myself to show you. I know my mechanics are not perfect, but I dont think that caused this injury.


#4

A kid in my school tore his labrum in the fall of his senior season. Like you, he tried to rush it and put off surgery for a couple months. By the time he decided to get the surgery it was too late and he was forced to miss his senior season. He was the starting catcher, a captian, and being looked at by schools such as B.C. and Northeastern. All I can say is work hard on your recovery and stay focused. Try not to worry about what can happen if you don’t get back to your old self, rather what can happen if you do.


#5

[quote=“spfouts20”]I think I originally hurt it during football of my senior year of high school. I landed on my shoulder and it poped out of socket. I’ve had a little pain in my shoulder ever since that incident. I never got it checked out because I did not expect to pitch in college( was recruted as an outfielder).

Then in college my coaches turned me into a full-time pitcher and I started throwing more than I ever had and it just made my shoulder worse. I’m not 100% sure but I do not believe that a mechanical problem caused this injury. I worked very hard this last year with my college coaches to perfect any mechanical problems I had. I do not have any video of myself to show you. I know my mechanics are not perfect, but I dont think that caused this injury.[/quote]

It does sounds like your football injury predisposed you to further problems with your shoulder. The Labrum is the socket of the shoulder, and it’s hard to dislocate your shoulder without damaging the Labrum in some way (since the Labrum is made up of soft material rather than bone).

However, I still think that your mechanics can affect the likelihood that your will have problems. I have studied the mechanics of large numbers of pitchers with Labrum problems and they seem to share a common mechanical flaw.

Something else you should think of is becoming, if you aren’t already, a complete freak about conditioning the muscles of your rotator cuff. That will help to hold your shoulder in the socket.


#6

Thanks nd and Chris. We did do some rotator cuff exercises at school. But I will start to do more. I checked out the rotator cuff exercises on this site and some of them are the same as the ones we did, but there are more that we did not do. So I will work harder on those exercises. Thanks again.