Knuckle Hit


#1

Why does the ball have cleary no rotation after you hit it sometimes? Does it mean anything about the hitter or pitcher?


#2

Usually that just tells you what type ball you hit, where you hit it on the bat, and where you hit it on the ball.

The reason hanging curveballs are so often hit for home runs is because they are thrown with topspin. That gets converted into backspin which helps keep the ball up in the air.


#3

As a hitter you want every hit to have backspin. This will help you hit the ball harder and help the ball carry.

Turning the bat over when hitting will put topspin on the ball so as a hitter you want to keep the bat head flat for as long as possible through the hitting zone.

As a pitcher you want to make hitters do the opposite by changing speeds and location.


#4

I hear this a lot. But I’m not so sure that the spin of the pitched ball has much bearing on the spin of the hit ball so it seems to me that if your hits have backspin, then you are hitting the ball off-center (slightly below or across the plane of the pitch to be precise). If this is true, then you’re not directing all of your energy in the direction the ball travels thereby not hitting it as hard. To me that means the extra lift from having backspin is canceled out by not hitting it as hard as you could have. But maybe the effect of backspin is more significant than the effect of hitting the ball slightly off-center. Comments?


#5

ever toss a basketball foward with backspin and have it come back to you? I would assume that the same thing happens with a baseball hitting a bat. would be cool to see an actual study of this stuff


#6

I understand what you’re saying however the force with which the bat hits a baseball is som much greater than the force of that basketball hitting a wall or the floor and bouncing backward.

Dunno.


#7

i dont know for sure, its kinda just what i thought would happen. I would like to see a set of super high speed videos of a ball contactinf a bat. i think that would be quite the interesting study