Kershaw's double leg kick


#1

I just turned 16 and im a 5’9 LHP throwing 81-84 but ive always been a wild pitcher, very un consistent. going to many different coaches over the years my accuracy continues to be un consistent. Watching a lot of different highschool, college, and pro pitchers over the years I can kind of notice the ones who hit their spots the most are the ones who have a very relaxed sort of windup who stay close to the ground instead of this huge leg kick. Kershaw is arguably the best pitcher in baseball as of now with his amazing accuracy and stuff. For my age I have great stuff im just having problems with accuracy. Is it a good idea to have a 2 leg kick windup?


#2

It’s fine to have a leg kick, but not too high, as you’ll sway and you’ll lose your balance.


#3


#4

you want it to be like this


#5

Higher lift legs usually mean more Velo and less control. Kershaw is pretty much a slide step guy - once his foot comes down he pitches with the same mechanics of a slide step.


#6

I would strongly advise not trying to mimic what pros do. The way pros go about their mechanics has been refined by years of working with the best pitching coaches in the country. It isn’t likely that what Kershaw does will help you, there’s only one of him. Work with a coach to help gain control, but stay away from taking pieces of pros mechanics and trying to replicate them.


#7

Somewhat correct, IMO.

There are many pro’s whose mechanics are models for what to do. Actually, most pro’s have very sound, very basic mechanics. There are however, more than a handful that have some odd properties in their motions and are quite successful with their particular quirks. What you do see is a set of check points that virtually every pro pitcher passes with some slight variations in what they are doing at any one point. Don’t try to copy them: let you body do it’s thing but refer to those pitchers to see what they are doing at a particular point.


#8

More times than not, a high leg lift does not improve velocity but only slows down forward momentum. It can also cause balance issues.

I’d generally encourage pitchers to aim for a maximum knee height of about 60%-70% of a pitcher’s body height.


#9

how does a higher leg kick slow down forward momentum?


#10

Could you eloborate on this? My only experience with the lead leg outisde of conventional wisdom was when it was more aggressive and went higher it comes down so hard that it flies open a lot. I always thought tjay was because there was more momentum - so it wouldn’t carry into the body? Would the swing cause the loss in momentum you speak of?


#11

This has been discussed on LTP in the past. I wouldn’t focus on the leg kick itself. Focus instead on what the muscles of the hips and pelvis are doing loading and unloading.

In my opinion, the leg kick is really all about producing load (tension) in the muscles – so for some pitchers, a higher leg kick allows for that to happen, while for others a lower leg kick allows for that to happen.

The sweet spot tends to be a knee lift around 60%-70% of a pitcher’s height.

However, higher knee lift guys like Nolan Ryan were still obviously extremely explosive to the plate because they get their hips moving faster and earlier in their delivery.