Keeping the pitching arm bent prior to high cocked position


#1

i’ve noticed multiple pitchers such as nolan ryan, maddux, strasburg, prior ect. all keep their pitching arms bent to some degree before their arms get into the high cocked position. I noticed in the video clips section of this site, however, that clemens’ pitching arm is preety much straight before he gets to the high cocked position. Is it more efficient to keep the throwing arm bent or does it not matter as long as your opposite and equal?


#2

In Humeral Torque in Professional Baseball Pitchers, Sabick et al. concluded that “pitchers who elbows were more extended at stride foot contact tended to have lower peak humeral torques.”

So, in theory, an extended elbow at foot contact but prior to the maximum external rotation would decrease stress on the humerus. Remember that in Correlation of Throwing Mechanics With Elbow Valgus Load in Adult Baseball Pitchers by Aguinaldo et al. that increased elbow flexion was closely related to reducing valgus torque, so an extended elbow throughout the motion is not necessarily ideal.

Also notable is the fact that bone is sensitive to loading rate and not just peak values of stress - therefore, the faster and harder the humerus (and the connective tissue) is loaded, the more danger there is with regard to injury.


#3

what does sabick mean by extended when he says “pitchers whose elbows were more extended at stride foot contact”? Is this reffering to the benefit of leading with the elbow?

I assume its better to have a lower peak humeral torque.?

when you saying elbow flexion is that the arm in the high cocked pisition?


#4

[quote=“chew1109”]what does sabick mean by extended when he says “pitchers whose elbows were more extended at stride foot contact”? Is this reffering to the benefit of leading with the elbow?

I assume its better to have a lower peak humeral torque.?

when you saying elbow flexion is that the arm in the high cocked pisition?[/quote]

Michelle Sabick’s (not a “he”) paper is discussing the elbow being straight during stride foot contact (SFC) which is prior to maximum external rotation (MER) in the classic ASMI model of pitching.

It’s probably better to have a lower peak humeral torque, yes. This was discussing the effects of peak humeral torque as it relates to fractures of the upper arm, which are not uncommon.

And yes, increased elbow flexion as the arm enters MER (the “high-cocked position”) was correlated with decreased valgus load.