kc86 and Centerfield2150


#1

hey guys I’ve been lurking around the forum for a while, and you two seem to posess the most knowledge about working out for pitching results. I was just wondering if you two could possibly post your workouts and or help me create a workout of my own? I’m 17 about 5’11 160 pounds and I’ve experimented with weight training before just never did the research i needed to do. I’m currently doing the Kris Benson workout that I think one of you posted. Its going okay but I think you guys have researched way more and have used more resources so I’m interested in what you are doing. Right now I’m throwing mid-high 70s and I’m looking to generate as much power and speed as possible through weight training long toss, and whatever else i should be doing. I just started pitching again this year after about a 2 year break and I want to become the best i can be.

Oh and anyone besides kc and centerfield definatley put in your input as well, im just here to get as much knowledge as possible.

Thanks
Keith


#2

Right now I am doing the 50 day program from Never Gymless by Ross Enamait. It is a lot of anaerobic conditioning mixed with strength work- no rest circuits, interval training, supersets, etc. I am not so sure it would be best for a pitcher to follow the program exactly, seeing as the demands in baseball are very different from combat sports (which is what I am competing in now).

I’ll wait to see if CF has a program ready and comment further at that point.


#3

I have a workout that you could use it’s a 12 week functional training workout. The throwing involved in the program in the offseason would be around 20-30 pitches A day. With the training.

Take a look it will not hurt

www.pitching101.50megs.com GO to MY WORKOUT


#4

Hey, my first thought is have you taken a look at Steve’s TuffCuff Book.
He has everything layed out in there, lifting, nutrition, throwing, prehad, and much more. All in one organized and easy to use manual.

Now I have the last four weeks of what I’ve been doing layed out in an excel file. I’ve made a lot of tweaks to it, and you can take a look. To be honest it’s kinda sloppy, haha.

One thing is that I’ve set it up to meet my goals. Throwing harder and going deeper in games is the obvious first goal. Also I’m trying to add weight as I’m 6’1" 160lbs (154 before I started lifting about 6 weeks ago). I also play the field so I’m looking to add speed and more strength to carry over when batting. However I don’t feel like my goals take away from it being effective for pitchers.

It’s based off an adaptation of the Russian Conjugate method in which an athlete trains both maximal strength and speed strength at the same time.
I used Joe Defrancos Modified Westside Program (WS4SB) as somewhat of a template. However, I varied it up to be more appropriate for pitchers. As Defranco’s template is probably more suitable for football players.

Remember a lifting program will only make you a better athlete, it’s necessary to be pitching and throwing regularly to apply improved athleticism to pitching.

PM me with your email if you’d like to take a look.


#5

KC what combat sport do you do?


#6

I train in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu right now. Hopefully within the next year I will be training some kickboxing (did boxing for a while before BJJ) and try to integrate that into MMA. I’ll be competing in BJJ next month.

CF,
Russian conjugate method is pretty cool stuff. Most of the stuff I am doing now involves that type of training. Ross seems to be a big fan of Verkhoshansky and Zatiorsky.


#7

[quote=“kc86”]
I train in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu right now. Hopefully within the next year I will be training some kickboxing (did boxing for a while before BJJ) and try to integrate that into MMA. I’ll be competing in BJJ next month.

CF,
Russian conjugate method is pretty cool stuff. Most of the stuff I am doing now involves that type of training. Ross seems to be a big fan of Verkhoshansky and Zatiorsky.[/quote]

You wouldn’t have happened to watched UFC 73 tonight? There were some crazy BJJ fighters. Definately a loaded card.

Zatiorsky seems to be a big name that comes up. There’s some books and complications he’s published with tons of information and logs of athletes (Russians apparently kept incredibly detailed logs) I’m hoping to pick some of his stuff up and a basic college level text on biomechanics.

I really like conjugate because I feel you are able to apply your progress constantly throughout your training and you don’t ever neglect speed, or strength for an extended period of time. I feel like this provides a solid carry over as your always in a position to compete, versus western periodization where you may be in a hypertrophy phase, which while it’s preparing you to make great and productive gains down the road, I don’t see as good of skills carry over until down the road either.

Now a case could be made that the progress will still be the same on Western vs Eastern Periodization but I prefer a constant improvement rather than more of an ability spike at the end of the offseason when everything comes together.

And I mean who doesn’t love going to train with the intention of setting a PR a couple times a week.

But hey, a case could be made that I’ve established a biased towards the Eastern methods, to be honest I’ve been led to study more about Eastern methods than Western methods.

Kc, I’ve also got a question for you; for some reason I felt like quite a while back you said you were majoring in exercise science or something in that area. I may be completely off base, but if you are studying that I had a few opinion questions for ya.


#8

[quote=“centerfield2150”]You wouldn’t have happened to watched UFC 73 tonight? There were some crazy BJJ fighters. Definately a loaded card.
[/quote]
Yep. The Nogueira fight had me scared for a bit though :shock: Anderson Silva showed some extremely slick moves on the ground and then he cleaned house on the feet. Overall a very solid night of fights.

I think many of the Soviet guys kept great notes because of the tremendous pressure to succeed. The Olympics were a big part of the Communist party’s attempts to “beat” the West, so the success of your athletes probably played heavily into your job security.

[quote]I really like conjugate because I feel you are able to apply your progress constantly throughout your training and you don’t ever neglect speed, or strength for an extended period of time. I feel like this provides a solid carry over as your always in a position to compete, versus western periodization where you may be in a hypertrophy phase, which while it’s preparing you to make great and productive gains down the road, I don’t see as good of skills carry over until down the road either.

Now a case could be made that the progress will still be the same on Western vs Eastern Periodization but I prefer a constant improvement rather than more of an ability spike at the end of the offseason when everything comes together.

But hey, a case could be made that I’ve established a biased towards the Eastern methods, to be honest I’ve been led to study more about Eastern methods than Western methods. [/quote]
I think the Eastern has a better application to the sporting world (as opposed to power or olympic lifters). The very basis of sports is the combination of so many different variables in the same period. Strength, speed, power and endurance. Training them all, rather than one at a time, seems to make a lot of sense.

Nope, History Major. Exercise science and S&C is more of a hobby/ side interest that I have had for a few years, beginning when I tried to rehab my knee injury. I have gone back and forth with the idea of getting certified as a personal trainer and possibly working in the field, but I’m not so sure yet (It is not cheap to go through classes and get certified). It would be a lot easier if you could take the tests online, rather than driving to some testing center. Ah well…

I have been working for the last couple summers for some performance training camps for basketball and football, so I think I have a pretty good idea of that side (elementary to Jr. High aged kids) of the business.