JT 14U pitching analysis


#1

#2

Is there someone catching you? If so, is that person standing up or down in the backstop’s position?


#3

Yes their is a catcher squaring.


#4

That would explain (somewhat) one of the reasons why you have such an upright posture throughout your delivery. Hence, your pitching to an upright target, not a target in the catcher’s down position.

Your entire posture - minus the leg lift and other things when you step back, shows an infielder’s throw, like a shortstop tossing to first.

I would suggest getting more into the pitch by committing your entire body to be more aggressive in going towards your target, letting your glove side hip lead the way, planting your stride foot with your glove side hip facing your target, then rotating your hips first, then committing your upper body … bending at the waist, then exchange your shoulders and deliver with an ending posture that has your pitching shoulder being pointing directly at your target and your glove should away from your target.

Basically, this is a normal body delivery posture. Others will chime in and put more detail to you question and their observations will be more helpful than what I posted here.

Overall you have the appearance of a strong and physically fit physique that should serve you well at the pitcher’s position.


#5

You don’t use your lower half very effectively. You need to get your center of mass (think “butt”) moving forward sooner and faster. And, to aid in being more athletic/agressive, I think you need to start with some bend in your knees. Also, look into the Hershiser drill.

But the first change I would suggest is to start with your feet closer together to eliminate the weight shift back towards 2B. That weight shift makes you slower to the plate, can be a source of inconsistency and gives base runners a jump start.


#7

JT, do you understand fully what Roger just posted for you?

Try the suggestions given to you here in a very slow and deliberate way at first and get a feel for the way your body can balance itself, then move progressively from one confidence level to the next.

This media can have many restrictions to it, narrating this-n-that, do this then do this and so on. But, if you piece together each stage of what’s being suggested you should have a technique that, sooner or later, settles in to your style and what feels the most comfortable.

Take your time with this and don’t rush things. Roger is one of the best at what he does, so take every opportunity to listen and ask questions… lots of questions. Just be mindful that you’re only 14, and not a fully matured athlete like those guys playing Major League ball. Those guys in the pro ball also have their learning curves, day in and day out. Pitching is a challenge to be sure.

A final note - as I mentioned earlier, this stuff isn’t easy. In fact, pitching a baseball… not tossing it, but pitching, is about as unnatural for the human body as it gets. And if the technique of moving muscles, balancing yourself with each progressive movement, coupled with all these rules that a pitcher can and can not do… well, it’s not for everybody.


#8

I applaud the effort to construct a portable mound for maximum training time, however, I think the mound’s construction is ingraining bad delivery habits. The mound moving underneath you is preventing you from really driving off the rubber. It’s shifting forward and back all the time. I don’t think you are really pushing off of it because you are trying to prevent it from moving around. It must feel like pitching in a canoe.