It all comes to an end/some advice

Been a while since I posted here. Some of you might remember me.

So, I have a kid who developed into somewhat of a pitcher. Pretty good for the 9-13 age group. Above average velo, so-so control, but great off speed stuff. Always watched pitch count, did the “right thing”.

Last year about May/June his back started to hurt a little, played on while keeping an eye on it. Now, four doctors (three spine specialist), and one chiropractor later his pitching days are over. He broke two bones in his back at the L5 called the Pars Interarticularis (Pars Defect). We will never know, but not getting it treated right away most likely allowed it to become Spondylolisthesis. And I was worried about LL elbow.

He was in a brace for three months, and while it will never heal the chrio says he should be fine with conditions (like no pitching). He’s been hitting/fielding and playing basketball for about a month now with no issues. Also, he’s a grade 1, Andre Agassi won a few majors and had a great tennis career with a grade 2, so all is not lost.

One other kid on his team had the same problem, and the chiro says he’s seeing it more and more, so a little heads up to all you dad’s with a pitcher. And, the doctors were worthless, saying just play and good luck. The chiropractor is the only one who helped.

Sorry to hear about what’s happened to your boy.

[quote=“SomeBaseballDad”]
One other kid on his team had the same problem, and the chiro says he’s seeing it more and more, so a little heads up to all you dad’s with a pitcher. And, the doctors were worthless, saying just play and good luck. The chiropractor is the only one who helped.[/quote]

I am also sorry to hear about your sons injury; wish you & your family the very best. I’d never heard of this type of injury until reading your post & have taken a little time to research. Grateful for you sharing this experience and giving a heads up to the injury type. I am curious as to whether you’ve sought a second opinion after chiropractor’s diagnosis; I understand you’ve seen spine specialist but wondering if only prior to diagnosis. If second/third opinions sought; are all in agreement with long term prognosis and limitations on future activities?

Truly sorry to hear about your son’s condition. I wish him the best of luck with his condition. From what I’ve read, if the slippage is less than 50%, it seems to have a decent chance of not progressing-- if he limits the types of activities he participates in.

Certainly not the best news a parent can receive. Our best wishes are with you and your son.

[quote=“Mike4”][quote=“SomeBaseballDad”]
One other kid on his team had the same problem, and the chiro says he’s seeing it more and more, so a little heads up to all you dad’s with a pitcher. And, the doctors were worthless, saying just play and good luck. The chiropractor is the only one who helped.[/quote]

I am also sorry to hear about your sons injury; wish you & your family the very best. I’d never heard of this type of injury until reading your post & have taken a little time to research. Grateful for you sharing this experience and giving a heads up to the injury type. I am curious as to whether you’ve sought a second opinion after chiropractor’s diagnosis; I understand you’ve seen spine specialist but wondering if only prior to diagnosis. If second/third opinions sought; are all in agreement with long term prognosis and limitations on future activities?[/quote]

First visited the family physician, he misdiagnosed. Then a spine specialist who also misdiagnosed. Saw the second specialist who ordered a bone scan and found the problem but just said deal with it. Then went to a chrio who ordered a brace and sent us to the third specialist to do the actual prescription for the brace. That doctor contradicted the chrio and said no brace, deal with it. Went back to the chrio who then got us in a brace himself. It was a clusterflip to say the least.

The chrio ordered the brace and gave him some exercises to do. also he used an MRI to diagnose, which gave much more detail and was much cheaper than the bone scan. All the doctors agreed that the odds were very small it would progress.

To see him now you would never know anything was wrong. At 14 and 8th grade school ball he’s hitting in the 300 ft range with a wood bat. Pitching was never going to be his future in baseball, just something we did to help his travel team fill innings. He’ll miss it, but it’s an end, not the end.

[quote=“SomeBaseballDad”]
To see him now you would never know anything was wrong. At 14 and 8th grade school ball he’s hitting in the 300 ft range with a wood bat. Pitching was never going to be his future in baseball, just something we did to help his travel team fill innings. He’ll miss it, but it’s an end, not the end.[/quote]

Very glad to hear, sounds like your sons got a bright future. Thanks again for the heads up and wish your son the very best on a great baseball (& all other endeavors) future!

Some interesting info. Played a double header today and talked about Keeg’s condition to a set of new parents on the team and the grandfather of a past player.

Parents of the new player said their older son has two broken pars at L3 and L5. Had to give up football but plays baseball and swims (with restrictions). The grandfather said he was born with the pars not developed and has a grade II and didn’t know it until recently when he had some numbness in his legs.

Anyway, if your kid has lower back pain spend the couple of bucks and get an MRI, and be thankful if you wasted your money.

“It all come to an end” seems to be misleading. It would appear that “pitching has been somewhat curtailed” is more appropriate, as his doctor has cleared him to pitch on a limited bases. No full games any more, but an inning or two here and there as a closer seems to be in line.

So like it’s Keegan Rivera, LOL.

No matter, with a bat in his hand he has proven to be, playing varsity summer ball as an incoming freshman, pretty well unstoppable.

That said, keep an eye on your kid. If this post helps someone from going through what we have then great.

Great news!

Thank you.

It would seem, too me, that an injury like this would be the end. I mean bones that hold the vertebrae together are broke and will never heal. But he has played baseball all summer without a hiccup. Last tournament, a high level 14u, he was 13/22 at the plate with 22 rbi’s and 15 runs driven in. That’s not bad. I’d like to see where talent like that will take him. On the other hand I think we appreciate seeing him simply being able to step onto the field more so than ever.

My friend’s father has something similar although he’s in his 80’s. He has had 1 of 3 (I believe) surgeries in which they somehow “glue” the pieces back together. Don’t know if this would be applicable to your boy but if you want me to get the doctor’s name, let me know. From my friend’s description of the surgery, it sounds like it is done arthroscopically. I believe the doctor works out of the hospital in Flagstaff, Arizona.

What my son has is Spondylolisthesis. I would really like to see the info, thanks. Right now as long as he’s playing like this, pain free, I’m staying the course his doctor has laid out.