Is this a good lifting program for a pitcher?


#1

Lower-2x a week

trap bar deadlift-4x5
squat-4x5
bulgarian split squat-3x6 each leg
calf raises-3x12

upper-2x a week

DB chest press 3x6
DB row 3x6 each side
tricep extension 3x6
chinups 3 sets to failure
forearm work

i also sprint 1x a week.

this is just my conditioning and i also do more stuff


#2

Sure, it’s better than most. You can probably omit calf raises, though, and you should do sprint/interval work more often.


#3

pretty good. It’s better than most. Doing the same exercises every lower and upper body workout may get repetitive, but it’s fine if you want to keep it simple. Keep this phase in the 4-6 week range. You’ll want to vary it up after that. There’s some possibility you have trouble on the lower body workout with squats and trap deads back to back. If so, reduce the volume of one of the lifts every other workout. So 3-4 sets of Trap Deads 2-3 sets of Squats one workout and 3-4 sets squats 2-3 sets trap deads the next. You might have to play it by ear a little bit.

You’re going to get stronger though. Just remember to eat plenty, get that post workout nutrition and lift like a frickin MANIMAL!


#4

[quote=“LankyLefty”]pretty good. It’s better than most. Doing the same exercises every lower and upper body workout may get repetitive, but it’s fine if you want to keep it simple. Keep this phase in the 4-6 week range. You’ll want to vary it up after that. There’s some possibility you have trouble on the lower body workout with squats and trap deads back to back. If so, reduce the volume of one of the lifts every other workout. So 3-4 sets of Trap Deads 2-3 sets of Squats one workout and 3-4 sets squats 2-3 sets trap deads the next. You might have to play it by ear a little bit.

You’re going to get stronger though. Just remember to eat plenty, get that post workout nutrition and lift like a frickin MANIMAL![/quote]

I would combine heavier deadlifts on one leg day with sets no heavier than 50%-70% of my 1RM squat on the same day. For this day, on light squats I would work on trying to keep the bar moving at a constant speed and really look at the range of motion and depth (maybe do box squats). On the other day I would do just the opposite - deadlifts would be my light lift and squats would be my heavier lift. On any light day it would be form & power driven. Trap Bar deadlifts are great for form work & I would almost suggest box squats for learning proper depth and technique.

Why are you doing chin-ups to failure?

Also what about flexibility/mobilization work?


#5

i do strech out after my lifts. and idk i just prefer to do chinups rather than seated lat pulldowns.


#6

Mix chin ups with pull ups, because they build a better strength in the upper body combined.


#7

but why to failure?


#8

but why to failure?[/quote]

Why would you not do an exercise to failure?


#9

Try deadlifting to failure and report back.


#10

but why to failure?[/quote]

Why would you not do an exercise to failure?[/quote]

Didn’t want to just copy something - so here is the link with some information on the subject. It is similar to what I have read else where. The main difference is that the author doesn’t completely dismiss training to failure.

http://www.ironmagazine.com/article274.html

but one key thought is pretty clear -
“However you want to look at it, training too intensely, too often, will certainly lead to nervous system inhibition. When that happens you can forget about making good progress until you take enough of a break to allow for nervous system recovery.”

Not that during chin-ups to failure will cause this - I was just interested in the rationale since none of the other lifts trained to failure - (of course Chins to failure for many people (at one time my self included) results in a big solid goose-egg number of repititions).


#11

I think that is what the Iowa Football players were trying to do!


#12

I think that is what the Iowa Football players were trying to do![/quote]

Haha, good one :wink:


#13

what point are you trying to make about the deadlift kyleb?


#14

I think that was a tongue-in-cheek response. No one is advocating doing dead-lifts to failure. Goodluck with your workout.


#15

The Nautilus lower back is such a better exercise than the primitive deadlift.


#16

Yes, of course it is. Because isolating muscle groups is exactly what you do in baseball. Or sports. Or anything besides curling a specific weight.

Have you done any research on your idols to see if what they’re talking about is supported by anyone else? Or are you going to just follow their advice blindly and assume their interpretation of exercise science is correct?

If you are a responsible person who wants to learn the most about any given subject, you initially start with assuming that what you know/believe is false, and then try to prove that these false beliefs are in fact true. You do not start with a hypothesis and then find evidence that supports said hypothesis. That is not research; it isn’t honest investigation.

Of course, I’m generally wasting my time since you refuse to do any of this. But I’m not letting the rest of this forum fall prey to the garbage of “Super Slow Training” that’s been around forever but only made popular recently by McGuff et al.


#17

Good luck with your training! - I wonder if there is a pound for pound transition between - your nautilus max “dead lift” and just a plain old primitive dead lift? If there isn’t maybe you could explain why one is superior to the other?


#18

Good luck with your training! - I wonder if there is a pound for pound transition between - your nautilus max “dead lift” and just a plain old primitive dead lift? If there isn’t maybe you could explain why one is superior to the other?[/quote]

The Nautilus lower back machine features a correct cam profile that varies the resistance in accord with the strength curves of the muscles being trained.


#19

So do EliteFTS bands that cost $20.


#20

Kyle I’m gonna call you out. In another thread you stated that elitefts bands were “expensive” :lol: :lol: