Is the eephus pitch a real or justifiable pitch


#1

So I make my kid throw 5 eephus pitch us at the end of every bp I catch for him and he hates it. Pretty much thinks it just a stupid pitch with no merit at all. let’s face it you never hear about the guys great eephus pitch. So where playing in Omaha last week in a TT tourney. During the college World Series which I would highly recommend it was a great time, baseball 24/7 all the 15 yo just had a blast hanging at the stadium when we were done playing.

So this is it 6th inning my kids at 81 pitches, the kid he is pitching against is at 11 pitches with a variety of 2 seams, curves, and fastball. I can see my kid is frustrated, tiring a little because he did not throw much as a freshman in hS ball. so I am watching him thinking what’s he got to do to get this kid out it 3-2 has to throw a strike the kids a disciplined hitter and he uncorks this 12 ft arch eephus the kid swings strikes out my kid gives a big old fist pump and smile. Our 3rd baseman also our 1 or 2 pitcher is just launching his butt off at what he just seen. It was comical.

He also threw it twice this weekend for strike outs against a much weaker team.

My kids a decent pitcher gets kids out with. Location and doesn’t overpower many 2,3,4,5, hitters. I guess my question is this a legit pitch if he throws it with fastball arm action and just slips the palmball grip real loose?


#2

The “eephus” pitch, also known as the blooper, the folly floater, the “La Lob” and various other names, is a slow, high-arcing curveball which can reach heights of 15-20 feet, and it can be extremely difficult to hit—or extremely easy to hit. It came about as the result of an injury to pitcher Rip Sewell who was forced to alter his pitching delivery; he started throwing it, with varying degrees of success. Some other pitchers have used it, such as Bobo Newsom, while others have ignored it—take your pick. It works best when thrown straight over the top. Incidentally, the term “eephus” had another meaning back when Lefty Gomez was pitching for the Yankees; he would often tell a pitcher to “give it the old eephus”, meaning “put something extra on the ball”—something entirely different, usually more speed or more breaking action on the pitch.
Personally, I prefer the hard slider, which I threw sidearm with the crossfire move in my playing days. The batters couldn’t touch it! 8)


#3

The “eephus” pitch, also known as the blooper, the folly floater, the “La Lob” and various other names, is a slow, high-arcing curveball which can reach heights of 15-20 feet, and it can be extremely difficult to hit—or extremely easy to hit. It came about as the result of an injury to pitcher Rip Sewell who was forced to alter his pitching delivery; he started throwing it, with varying degrees of success. Some other pitchers have used it, such as Bobo Newsom, while others have ignored it—take your pick. It works best when thrown straight over the top. Incidentally, the term “eephus” had another meaning back when Lefty Gomez was pitching for the Yankees; he would often tell a pitcher to “give it the old eephus”, meaning “put something extra on the ball”—something entirely different, usually more speed or more breaking action on the pitch.
Personally, I prefer the hard slider, which I threw sidearm with the crossfire move in my playing days. The batters couldn’t touch it! 8)


#4

I just turned 15 and I see some kids throwing the “eephus” from time to time. I never see it called for strikes. I think most umpires frown upon it, so if the batter doesn’t swing, you’ll be lucky to get it called. With some advice from people on here, I started working on a “circle change” this year. Some times I use it as the first pitch out of the shoot against a good hitter so he’s not sitting on my fastball. It tails in and down to a right handed batter, so they usually swing early or over it. It has a similar effect as an “eephus” in that it gets them off balance, but it will also get called if it’s around the plate. It’s effective for 3-2 counts when most hitters are looking fastball.