Is my arm supposed to be fully extended when i pitch?


#1

^^^

I see everyone releasing with pretty much a extended arm when pitching. I short arm my curve naturally, but when i (on fluke) get it extend it I can throw a slurve, which i’d love to throw instead.

It might cure my arm discomfort. I’ve been pitching really relaxed and not overdoing it or even coming close. I still get sore, but thats cause my physical condition is probably less than healthy. I’m on a diet and am trying to lose weight.

Under 200 is my current goal. 175-185 for a bit later.

I also try to stretch as much as possible. My upper body flex is not really fit for pitching at this point. I don’t really have a core at all lol its all flab.


#2

for your curveball problem, the idea is that your arm angle is what dictates the axis of the breaking ball so the more over the top you pitch the more 12-6 the pitch will be, i dont think there is any TRUE 12-6 though, every curveball will have a down and away spin to some degrees what i realized though by playing with the grips, is that the more you get your wrist straight the more downward action youll get, some guys tend to bend their wrist backward when throwing a curve and that flatens out a bit the spin making it more of a slurve, it can be effective against same arm sided batters. try it out, you can get 2 pitches out of really one motion by just tilting your wrist more forward or backward.


#3

The better the hitters are the more they will pick up the fact that you change your arm slot to throw the curve, I would think that you would want the most similar action to your fastball.


#4

What can i do to practice arm extension when throwing? other than the tilt for health. I"m getting used to tilting my shoulders so that my elbow is equal to my shoulder for my slot.

Now I feel like use short arm for my Fb too… which i know is bad, but I’m just a rec player trying to learn on my own.


#5

When Ed Lopat was with the Chicago White Sox he learned both the long-arm and the short-arm deliveries from manager Ted Lyons who was himself no slouch on the mound. I was a natural sidearmer who was using the long-arm delivery, and when Lopat came to the Yankees he showed me how to adapt the short-arm motion to my delivery. So I used both of them for all my pitches, not to mention the crossfire, and that discombooberated the batters something awful because they had no idea what I was going to throw or how I was going to throw it, whether I would use the crossfire or not…the result was a whole bunch of delicious strikeouts!
So you can learn to use both types of delivery, the way I did, and that will give you twice as many pitches. :slight_smile: 8)