Is it enough?


#1

Im a red shirt freshman at one of the top division 2 programs in the country.
I have tried to increase my velocity for years now…but im starting to think that im just not meant to throw hard. I have had injuries to both my shoulder and elbow the past two years, neither of which required surgery. My question is…will i be appealing to scouts as a 6’5" 185 lbs lefty pitcher who throws lower 3/4 at about 80-82 fastball and what ive been told to be a major league slider by a professional pitching director/coach as well as a average change up. Is it too late to develop some velocity, i still have 4 years of eligibility.


#2

If its UTampa, Florida Southern, Franklin Peirce or Mount Olve than you always have a shot.

I don’t believe that people aren’t “born to throw hard” Some on here will argue the opposite.

I was 5’10 155 pounds as a freshman in college throwing 84-85

My senior year i’m 5’11 185 pounds throwing 89-92 and it is from working hard the last 4 years and not giving up.

I suggest you do the same and not give up if baseball means the world to you.


#3

I suggest you keep playing as long as you love to pitch. You will not know until you climb that mountain. There is nobody that can see into the future regarding velocity.

My son is a freshman on a Conference Carolinas team. He probably has a dream just like yours. Live the dream don’t let the dream live you.


#4

Don’t worry about the future right now, you’re a 6’5 lefty that puts you at a advantage over many people. You’ve got a lot of years to develop just keep throwing who knows where your velocity will end up.


#5

The way that I have always been taught is like this.

Is what you are doing working?

Yes --> Dont worry about it

No --> Change something

What you are doing obviously hasnt been working, so if you havent been changing things and always been trying to see if something new or different will work… Well then you will always be the 6’5 lefty who can only throw low 80’s with a history of problems. You can easily change some things, work on something new, and always get better/throw harder/have less injuries. Ive seen stranger things happen in my life.


#6

[quote=“Sunsetblud”]The way that I have always been taught is like this.

Is what you are doing working?

Yes --> Dont worry about it

No --> Change something

What you are doing obviously hasnt been working, so if you havent been changing things and always been trying to see if something new or different will work… Well then you will always be the 6’5 lefty who can only throw low 80’s with a history of problems. You can easily change some things, work on something new, and always get better/throw harder/have less injuries. Ive seen stranger things happen in my life.[/quote]

Thats a good point, I didn’t mean by saying not to worry that you shouldn’t work to improve. Try posting a video of your mechanics, I’m sure somebody will give you some good advice, you could also talk with the pitching coach at your school and see what they think.


#7

i am a senior in college and i am still contantly looking for new things to try. the problem is that im only now starting to change things. i kept everything like my mechanics, my workouts, my attitude, the same for years thinking that things would just workout. well they haven’t. but still, i have not given up and i still believe there is time to improve. and i’ll keep trying until they drag me off the field and tell me i can’t play.

don’t be like me man. don’t let your pride get in the way what you want to accomplish. if you are not happy with the way things are now, then don’t wait to change it. doing the same thing and expecting a different result is insane.


#8

thank you all for your responses…i appreciate all the encouragement and advice…Part of the reason my situation is so frustrating for me is because i have changed my mechanics numerous times since high school…i went from throwing high 3/4 to submarine to now low 3/4 and haven’t really received any instruction from pitching coaches until this fall. I know that there is plenty of time for me and i will definitely continue to work hard. Im just tired of finding myself at the lower portion of the rotation because my velo holds me back.


#9

Well I would wait and keep working out talk to ur pitching coach all that good stuff. But remember, some of the best pitchers out there didn’t throw hard, Jamie Moyer is a perfect example, and Pedro right now doesn’t show too much velo left but he’s still a force to be reconned with.

Being crafty is something you can’t forget how to do. Make sure you remember change of pace and location.


#10

Do you have a chance to throw harder… of course.

On pure speculation alone, it appears to me that you may be changing to much and or/ too often, especially arm slots. I would try and find something specific, such as a program (lifting / conditioning / throwing / weighted balls etc.) and STICK TO IT. Find a plan and stick to it. Give things a chance to work.


#11

Do you have a chance to throw harder… of course.

On pure speculation alone, it appears to me that you may be changing to much and or/ too often, especially arm slots. I would try and find something specific, such as a program (lifting / conditioning / throwing / weighted balls etc.) and STICK TO IT. Find a plan and stick to it. Give things a chance to work.[/quote]

This is great advice. Baseball isn’t for impatient people. You can’t throw 1000 pitches in a day and have something fixed over night. Sometimes you have to go to bed and pick things back up in the morning.


#12

Personally, I’m in the 90’s. But if you can get outs with quality pitches, it doesn’t matter. In my opinion, the MLB pitching coaches can improve all aspects of pitching…

So I would let them worry about it.