Interesting study!

It would seem a no brainer…

Interesting study.

Question is why do we need another study confirming things that have been confirmed over and over. Maybe not with the same statistical information, but certainly with the same premise, especially concerning overuse and overtraining of young athletes.

I would like to think that studies such as these could change people’s views on youth sports. I don’t see that happening. Those that are determined to turn their kid into the next Strasberg or Harper are running with blinders.

These people IMO will continue to push their kids past the limits as they see fit to reach their end game. In some cases it’s really not about what the kids want, it’s more about what the parents want. In far too many of these cases the kids get injured and/or burned out at a young age and the game loses another potentially good player.

Interesting indeed and well said Turn

I don’t know…my kid is what you could call an “eliet” player I guess, at least that’s what others say. And he suffered an overuse injury last year.

The thing is we (I) went to great pains to follow what I considered proper advice. No small amount of which came from posters here. Played different sports, took time off, crossed trained…and still he’s suffered an injury that will stay with him the rest of his life.

Maybe some kids bodies aren’t cut out to deal with the rigors of a high level of training. Apparently some are, as I know many kids who trained harder and did the whole one sport thing with no problems. Now, after his back injury all these people are coming out of the wood work on my wife’s side of the family with bad backs. Unfortunately my son didn’t come with a bar code that warned of such problems.

Maybe this is all just Darwin’s theory at work. Of course not arguing there aren’t over zealous parents out there.

Another article to confuse the minds of parents . . Should we or should we not pursue “elite” athletes during adolescence? I was talking with my son this weekend about whether he wanted to do travel ball this summer. He’s not considered “elite,” since he doesn’t play elite travel ball, but he’s a dominate pitcher who commands the mound, with an out pitch - a slider. The end result of the discussion was he wanted to play with his neighborhood friends and do things with the family, and not spend the weekend traveling and playing baseball. He wasn’t 100% sure, though, because he loves to pitch, but he loves to hang out as well. In the end, the family decided to decline the offer and stay home, play or travel as a family. He’s 13 and has plenty of time to pursue what he loves. I’m sure we’ll take some heat this week from his teammates, but in looking at the big picture, he’s not ready for intensive one sport training.

I believe in this approach, I call it “the theory of reasonability”.

If we as parents, keep in mind that the “window of opportunity” for a ball player to “get” to the majors is from really his Jr. year in HS through about his 22nd birthday…and then train accordingly, we’ll find way more guys who do, “get a shot”…which is really all a body can ask for anyway. So…[/quote]

There’s intense pressure in the youth baseball world to promote a child that has talent. In talking with my son’s coach recently, his position is that we have to promote our child, meaning playing as many travel ball games, participating in showcases, hitting all of the talent searches, etc. He was straight forward in his opinion, and disapproval of my opinion, that I was doing the wrong thing by letting my child (13U) be a child. If only I would do this, or that, then my son would be seen by important people, and his future would be secure.

If focus is turned more into enjoyment of the time (And NO that doesn’t mean compete less hard at any given moment) in prep for that window…well imo things will be much better.[/quote]

Another astute observation. My son is the most competitive player on his team. His 1st game he stared down the coach when taken out of the game, “Coach, it’s my game. Don’t take me out!.” The coach did the right thing. He had already thrown 97 pitches, but he wanted to win. (We lost, as the team’s ace gave up three straight hits.) In the last game, my son was as angry about baseball as I’ve seen him. He wanted to come in earlier in the game, shut down the opponents, and give his team a chance to win. Instead, he watched the #2 and third pitcher give up walk after walk, and by time he got in the game, it was 9 - 3 and the coach didn’t want to be 10-runned. He shut down the 1-2-3 hitters on nine pitches, but didn’t talk on the ride home.

[quote=“Dino”]JD’s “Theory of Reasonability to me is applying the “margin of safety” rule. Combat veterans know how to apply it to everyday life and casino gamblers have no clue it exists. Baseball parents have a tendency to relate more to the gamblers than the soldiers.

Some parents chose to “believe” that an obvious over investment of time and resources is “reasonable” when it comes to making a professional or college baseball player out of their kid. Or they may rationalize their investment and the forced investment of the other family members by highlighting “rewards” associated with the experience.

The only thing I have to say about planning ahead is a well known quote by I guess Woody Allen:

“And if you want to make God laugh, tell him about your plans.”

My firm belief is that if a child is talented enough to be a major leaguer….then no parent will be able to keep him out of MLB……….no matter how hard they try.[/quote]

Dino, thank you for your input. As parents, on our own wisdom and experience, we don’t know what is best. TB and showcases and very appealing, and if our son does well, it’s great for the ego. It’s hard to say no when everyone else is doing it. Hearing from someone who has been there is invaluable.

I believe in this approach, I call it “the theory of reasonability”.

First…Some…I have to believe that in many cases happen-stance is a huge part…the “what-if’s” will kill you though lad…Prior had no reason to think he’d have a collision in the base-paths…or take a liner directly off his elbow…Tony Canigliaro was going to be all that AND a cup of coffee…they, imo did the right things and the breaks went another way. My son…for him, my focus and vision was to be able to “get him” to a place where he had an opportunity…it happened…he got a virus the breaks went another way and now he’s coaching at a varsity level…media makes everything seem so attainable…~300 people on earth pitch at the MLB level and it is so freakin hard to get there…Steven for goodness sake…how tough is it that he’s got guys he played with, close friends who were on the journey with him…now he’s doing other positive things…

back to the theory of reasonability, my opinion is that, looking back, I can see many things…I see that the ideas behind “go for broke” travel play (50-100 games a year for a non-pubescent kid) are based on the athletic prep done by the highly skilled Olympic athletes who were all the media buzz in the 70’s and 80’s…skaters and gymnasts who were on the world stage before they could get a drivers license. The problem is that almost all of these athletes suffered ultimately from over-use injuries…no one knew though because there was no stage after the Olympics in which we could observe them. With youth players…we work them as if they can withstand the rigors of adult conditioning and then act as if we are surprised when they break down. If we as parents, keep in mind that the “window of opportunity” for a ball player to “get” to the majors is from really his Jr. year in HS through about his 22nd birthday…and then train accordingly, we’ll find way more guys who do, “get a shot”…which is really all a body can ask for anyway. So…it IS reasonable to play other sports, to never over-use a kid…no matter how good, to play increasing loads over-time…not start at 6-7-8-9 yr old kid at full grown, adult levels of 100’s of games before puberty…It is reasonable to enjoy the moment as fully as you can…because things happen and as Some has displayed…it can disappear very fast. If focus is turned more into enjoyment of the time (And NO that doesn’t mean compete less hard at any given moment) in prep for that window…well imo things will be much better.

JD’s “Theory of Reasonability to me is applying the “margin of safety” rule. Combat veterans know how to apply it to everyday life and casino gamblers have no clue it exists. Baseball parents have a tendency to relate more to the gamblers than the soldiers. I guess the reason is it is the child that is taking most of the risk. Remember what they said about General George “Blood and Guts” Patton. Your Blood — His Guts.

Some parents chose to “believe” that an obvious over investment of time and resources is “reasonable” when it comes to making a professional or college baseball player out of their kid. Or they may rationalize their investment and the forced investment of the other family members by highlighting “rewards” associated with the experience.

The only thing I have to say about planning ahead is a well known quote by I guess Woody Allen:

“And if you want to make God laugh, tell him about your plans.”

My firm belief is that if a child is talented enough to be a major leaguer….then no parent will be able to keep him out of MLB……….no matter how hard they try.

I’m not so sure about that. Lots of people have potential never reached, for one reason or another. If that parent allows the uninformed overuse that kid, the parent can be the party responsible for the kid not reaching his potential, be it due to injury, burn out, etc…

All I am saying is; Parents take too much credit for the success of their children and too much blame for their failures.

[/quote]

Point taken. I don’t 100% agree, but point taken. :slight_smile: