Interesting Read

Thought this article


was rather interesting thought some might enjoy it.

I don’t think the author knows much about baseball. Obviously he doesn’t realize pitchers don’t always have control of where the ball is going. Hitting a batter twice can happen to pitchers and its almost all of the time unintentional. He doesn’t realize a few inches makes the difference between a strike and a HBP. Safety is important, but this is taking it too far. This rule would compromise fundamental game play.

I am all for a couple replays, overturning a bad call, maybe some others…

This is just stupid. I watched that game - Hernandez (always throws A-rod an inside fastball - then a splitter). It went a bit inside - then - broken hand.

Personally, I would like to see them stop awarding first base to batters that do not attempt to avoid an inside pitch.

I hear ya on that

I’m not a big fan of anybody whose first inclination is to take away one person’s freedom and give it to another person in the name of “fairness.” Baseball already has enough rules. Hitters are already geared up with enough protective armor to go to war.

Why don’t we just play with soft baseballs that are not capable of inflicting injury? I’ll bet he’d be in favor of that too. Suggested title of article: MLB Realizes Hard Baseballs are A Danger."

:lol:

It’s true they game already heavily favours the hitters and they are so protected, I remember hearing an interview that dealt with Bonds and his armour on his elbow and the guy said that it was constructed in such a way that it would “lock” his elbow into the proper place consistently over a player who didn’t wear one, I’m not trying to take away from what he did but that right there is a huge advantage over a Pitcher.

Hey, 1.400 OPS is common buddy!

That article is horrendous. People are so soft in this country nowadays it’s unreal.

If anything, kids need to hit more batters. Pitchers are absolutely cowardly today. They have learned, in our self-esteem culture, to be passive and weak, to fear contact and try to throw strikes at all times. I walked more batters than I had in 7 years last season and had the best season of my life, because I pitched like an angry asshole. I relearned to pitch this way via meditation, because I was beat around so badly in 2011 and lost my aggressiveness.

I throw at hitters who try to lean in. I throw at hitters who think they can take big hacks and who look comfortable at the plate. But, despite throwing at their elbows often, I didn’t hit many. I wish I had hit more.

If anything, there are far too many pitchers who will let batters extend their arms time after time, cheating to get the head out. The best pitchers I have known, and the best I have been as a pitcher, were aggressive, angry and ALPHA. Here’s a quote from one of our hitters from spring training this season - it was intrasquad, and a pitcher started off with a called strike, threw two pitches to the backstop in the dirt of the opposite batters box; the next pitch was at the batter’s earhole. He stepped out and took his time getting back in; he looked nervous. The next two fastballs were right down the middle at 85. The one at his head prior was 91. I was behind the turtle watching it. The hitter looked at strike two and strike three, then took his helmet off and walked off. He was white in the face.

“I thought I was gonna die when he threw that pitch at my head. I was leaning in. I didn’t want to get back in the box after that.”

It was the most shaken I had ever seen a pro hitter. And I loved it.

That’s the power of the hit-by-pitch and the inside fastball. You don’t try to kill anyone, but you make sure they aren’t comfortable, even if that means breaking a few ribs or bruising a knee. In pro ball especially, it’s your job or his, and screw hitters. Screw em. If they don’t want to get hit, they can get a 9-5.

I will continue to tell kids during bullpens to throw inside to batters who look comfortable, take big swings or who have shown them up. The culture of respect needs to return to baseball.

[quote=“DanBlewett”]That article is horrendous. People are so soft in this country nowadays it’s unreal.

If anything, kids need to hit more batters. Pitchers are absolutely cowardly today. They have learned, in our self-esteem culture, to be passive and weak, to fear contact and try to throw strikes at all times. I walked more batters than I had in 7 years last season and had the best season of my life, because I pitched like an angry *****. I relearned to pitch this way via meditation, because I was beat around so badly in 2011 and lost my aggressiveness.

I throw at hitters who try to lean in. I throw at hitters who think they can take big hacks and who look comfortable at the plate. But, despite throwing at their elbows often, I didn’t hit many. I wish I had hit more.

If anything, there are far too many pitchers who will let batters extend their arms time after time, cheating to get the head out. The best pitchers I have known, and the best I have been as a pitcher, were aggressive, angry and ALPHA. Here’s a quote from one of our hitters from spring training this season - it was intrasquad, and a pitcher started off with a called strike, threw two pitches to the backstop in the dirt of the opposite batters box; the next pitch was at the batter’s earhole. He stepped out and took his time getting back in; he looked nervous. The next two fastballs were right down the middle at 85. The one at his head prior was 91. I was behind the turtle watching it. The hitter looked at strike two and strike three, then took his helmet off and walked off. He was white in the face.

“I thought I was gonna die when he threw that pitch at my head. I was leaning in. I didn’t want to get back in the box after that.”

It was the most shaken I had ever seen a pro hitter. And I loved it.

That’s the power of the hit-by-pitch and the inside fastball. You don’t try to kill anyone, but you make sure they aren’t comfortable, even if that means breaking a few ribs or bruising a knee. In pro ball especially, it’s your job or his, and screw hitters. Screw em. If they don’t want to get hit, they can get a 9-5.

I will continue to tell kids during bullpens to throw inside to batters who look comfortable, take big swings or who have shown them up. The culture of respect needs to return to baseball.[/quote]

AMEN :applause: :applause: :applause:

Dan, I take it you dont hit in the leauge you were playing in?

My son said he wouldnt throw at a hitting who hits a HR off of him. Its his job to get him out, he said he wouldnt throw at a hitter because he failed to get him out. The only time I have seen him throw at someone is in response to something else. A kid came up high on a tag when a teammate was sliding into second, shoving his glove into my sons teammates face. When that kid came up the next inning my son drilled him in the back with a fast ball. No one asked him to, they didnt have to. The same kid who was puffying his chest playing the tough guy the inning before walked down to first and then called time and went to his knees. Now that was funny. I cannot agree with throwing at peoples heads though. Pro ball is its own world. Owning the inside corner is important for a pitcher and you do what you have to do. I hope you dont advise kids to throw at other kids heads.

I think the reason that part of the game has been taken away from kids is most dont have the control to pitch well, so, giving bases usually leads to runs…and of course, the ongoing softening of our culture.

Well said Dan and fearsome

Today…achievers get rewarded, envied and discriminated against… in that order.

In the story I told, the pitcher did not throw at the hitter’s head on purpose - he was 1 year off surgery and couldn’t find his control; he got cut in spring training. Guys in pro ball don’t throw to hit people in the head - if you hit a guy on purpose, it’s in the ribs or the knee.

But, you throw up and in to back them off. You don’t try to dome people.

And yes, I did hit two seasons ago. My first at-bat I hit a one-hopper off the pitcher’s leg for an infield single. The next time up, I squared around to bunt. He threw it at my chin. I said “screw this. I’m done.” I moved way back in the box and somehow still got my bunt down. If anything, I realized firsthand that balls up at your head back you off the plate. I basically threw in the towel the rest of the day at the plate because I didn’t want to get hit and go out to pitch.

Dan I couldn’t agree more. Pitchers must control the inside of the plate. If that includes throwing off the plate inside to make the batter uncomfortable then so be it.

I would not condone head hunting, but a well placed fasball to the hip or inside at the ribs is necessary from time to time.

It’s true, a pitcher will throw high and inside to back the batter off the plate. But I have a story to tell you about what could happen when the pitcher miscalculates. For this we go back to September 17, 1951 and the bottom of the ninth inning of a crucial game between the Yankees and the Indians at Yankee Stadium. There was one out, and the Yankees had the bases loaded.
Bob Lemon was pitching for the Indians, and Phil Rizzuto was at bat with the count 0-and-1. He had stepped out of the batter’s box and was talking to the plate umpire, Cal Hubbard, and he started fussing around with his bat and ended up holding it at both ends—seemingly a casual maneuver, nothing anyone would pay attention to; but what nobody knew was that this was the signal to Joe DiMaggio on third: SUICIDE SQUEEZE IS ON. And when Rizzuto stepped back into the batter’s box, he looked over toward third base, and DiMag flipped his cap in a “gotcha” sign.
Lemon was nobody’s fool. He suspected that the Yankees were going to try something, so he decided to throw one up and in; the high inside pitch is probably the most difficult to bunt if anyone is going to try it. But Lemon miscalculated—the ball got away from him—and it started to come in behind Rizzuto’s head, which would have been a catastrophe if he had backed up. But the Scooter must have had eyes in the back of his head; he twisted around and got the bat on the ball and laid down the most exquisite dead-fish bunt anyone has ever seen—between the mound and first base, in the grass, where nobody could make a play on it. And DiMaggio, who had broken from third the minute Lemon went into his windup, could have crawled to home plate and eaten a sandwich, but he tore down the line toward the plate as fast as his aching but still serviceable legs could carry him, and he scored standing up!
Game over. Yanks won, 2-1. And Indians catcher Jim Hegan, seeing that nobody could make a play on that bunt, had picked up his mitt and walked off the field. The winning pitcher was Eddie Lopat, who had outpitched Lemon every step of the way. And I sat there in the upper deck behind the plate and thought, that’s not a bad way to win twenty games.
So, be advised that if you’re going to pitch high and inside to a batter, watch where you’re throwing the stupid ball! 8) :baseballpitcher:

Zita, that was a well told story and a first hand account. I would have liked to have met “Joltin” Joe, The Yankee Clipper. Married Marilyn Monroe !! Nuf said.


[/youtube]

Dino, that was one game I will never forget. It was the first and only time I played hooky from school to go to that game, and I will admit that I had an ulterior motive: I had been burning with curiosity about the slider all that season and I figured I would be able to ask one of the Yankee pitchers about it. Well, at the end of that game it hit me; I don’t know just how it happened, but I knew, without knowing how I knew, that Lopat was the one I would need to ask about that pitch. I did, albeit with some trepidation because I had no idea what to expect, but with four quiet words he had me in the palm of his hand. He said, “Go ahead, I’m listening,” and the way he said it relaxed me immediately. And when I told him that I just wanted to ask him something about the slider—it seemed that he knew instantly what I wanted to know, and he drew me aside and showed me how to throw a good one.
Incidentally, here’s a note about that suicide squeeze. Not even Casey Stengel, who had a tendency to micromanage and call all the plays from the dugout, knew about it. Rizzuto and DiMaggio had been working on it all through spring training and during the season, just waiting for the right moment. And on top of all that, the Scooter beat it out for a hit. Talk about a walk-off! 8) :slight_smile: