Increasing Arm Speed


#1

I’ve posted to this site before, and I’ve four all of the feedback I’ve gotten very helpful. One thing that coaches have told me before, and people on this forum have told me is that my arm speed is slow. From what I’ve been told this all starts with hand break, and the speed of the arm as its behind the body. I was curious if there are drills, workouts, or anything I can do to help speed my arm up. Im not sure if weights, weighted balls, dry practice or anything else can help speed my arm up?


#2

could you put a video up of your mechanics? you have to know the symptoms first and foremost.


#3

I know a few people who have taken up little boxing drills to train their fast-twitch muscles, and they said it has helped.

Kind of extreme in my opinion


#4

here is a link to a bullpen i threw earlier this summer, my mechanics are slightly different as i dont have current video but this video shows some of the lack of arm speed.

And here is another one from slightly later in the summer but the same thing, my mechanics are slightly changed but it does the job showing the slow arm speed.


#5

To increase your arm speed, you need to make your arm action more fluid arm action.

Check out my article on arm action. Maybe you can pull somethings to do from there.

http://jimmywinkelman.hubpages.com/hub/Improve-your-Arm-Action-and-Torso-Action-and-in-turn-External-Rotation


#6

You need some old fashioned intent. Move the body faster and see if the arm speeds up. See below how he is physically preparing himself to exert a ton of energy and move explosively. By getting in that “ready mode” he is getting the CNS ready to give a 110% effort.


#7

I second what irunSTL said. Start by speeding up your entire delivery and see what effect that has on your arm speed. The lower half dictates the overall timing of your delivery. All of the pieces then have to fit into that overall timing. Try to get from first forward movement into foot plant in .90-.95 seconds.


#8

If you want to work on raw intent, you can try working on ‘pull downs’ with an aggressive step behind.

This could help start making your body move faster and could in turn start moving your arm faster and help you feel a higher intent.

I agree intent can help and is something that you should try working on.


#9

Okay thanks for the advice, ill try to get some newer video up once I start working on things again, as I have been taking it easy nursing a lower back injury. So by intent, you simply mean: trying to throw the ball harder? I mean each pitch I can’t say I try to throw the ball as hard as I possibly can, not that I lay off but I don’t throw 100% each pitch. Just trying to make sure I understand the advice.


#10

Sidewinder…

What were they doing specifically for their fast twitch?

I have found working a heavy bag as a great way to initiate rotation with the hip. Good way to cue that motion and is a great workout as well.

Working a heavy bag workout or a boxing workout is no more extreme than any other workout. Interested to see what they are doing is transferable to pitching at all.


#11

it looks actually like youre trying to over compensate. i would say to break your hands later and your arm will have to catch up naturally. Then you can revert to what ever you were doing before.


#12

Thats interesting feedback, its actually the opposite of what ive been hearing. Ive always been taught to break the hand with the knee as if they are attached on a string. In the past I’ve even had bicep tendon problems when my arm lags behind. I would agree that theres definitely a timing issue here, and i can see how once I get my arm up it looks like theres some inefficiency possibly a hitch? Would starting my hands later real fix all of this??


#13

[quote=“fearsomefour”]Sidewinder…

What were they doing specifically for their fast twitch?

I have found working a heavy bag as a great way to initiate rotation with the hip. Good way to cue that motion and is a great workout as well.

Working a heavy bag workout or a boxing workout is no more extreme than any other workout. Interested to see what they are doing is transferable to pitching at all.[/quote]

The two pitchers who did the boxing stuff were big guys 6’ 5" and 250+ lbs. They both threw the crap out of the box, but they just lacked that extra coordination to take them to the next level and be more consistent.

I’m not exactly sure what they did but they thought it helped them. I haven’t seen them pitch recently so I can not attest to their results yet.


#14

You’re a sidearmer, right? Tell me—have you ever tried working with the crossfire? This is a beautiful and deadly move that works only with the sidearm delivery, and I have found that using this move can add both speed and power to my pitches. Let me see now: I’m assuming you’re a righthander. So you go into the windup, or the stretch, or whatever—but instead of pitching directly to the plate you take a step toward third base, whip around and fire the pitch in from that direction. I picked up that move when I was thirteen, having read about how Ewell Blackwell used to do it, and I fell so in love with it that I wound up using it all the time, a fact which was not lost on my pitching coach who helped me refine it and once said to me, "You use that move with everything you throw."
And let me tell you, batters have the devil’s own time trying to hit it and end up grumbling and grousing their way back to their dugout. I got an awful lot of strikeouts that way. :slight_smile: