Inconsistant Umpires


#1

Its soo frustrating! The first inning I pitched, I only threw 6 pitches. The ump was calling reasonable strikes. It was smooth sailing through 3. I had a 5 run cushion. I only let in 1 ER, and 1 R on an error. By the 4 inning, the ump started to use a tight strike zone than before. I was trying everything to get strikes. Pitches that landed the strike zone, he didn’t call strikes, he wasn’t calling strikes that he did in the first 3 innings. It just made me frustrated. I pitched 5 Innings, let in 3 R, so it was 5-3 then left the sixth inning with runners on 3 and 1. The next pitcher let in those 2 runs to tie. And we ended up losing the game by 1.

When I was pitching, I could of got so many more outs, but the ump was just unconsistent. He wasn’t calling strikes. But I guess you can’t do anything about it.


#2

Re: “But I guess you can’t do anything about it.”

-------You can (and should) do something about it…this is what you should do, IMO:

  1. Continue to train yourself to never show any emotion (disappointment, anger, surprise, etc) no matter what happens on the mound.

This is a very useful mind-set for any pitcher: No matter how bad things get…whether my pitching stinks today, or the umpires stink today, or my defense is error-prone today, or whether the opponent is just way better than us today, or some combination of the above…nothing I do on the field will reveal any frustration, anger, disappointment, etc, etc.

  1. Train yourself to appear calm and confident at all times, even if your insides are really feeling the storm.

  2. Give yourself a break–baseball is a game of failure. If your exterior facade of business-like confidence gets shaken up now and then, don’t worry about it…use those moments to learn what really bothers you the most, and train yourself to overcome those types of moments in the future.

  3. Learn how to laugh into your glove when everything is going wrong. Sometimes laughing in the middle of a disaster can really help you to refocus and bear down—but you don’t want your teammates, coaches, and opponents to see you laughing: They may take it wrong. So, put your glove up to your face and have a good laugh–then back to business.


#3

[quote=“laflippin”]Re: “But I guess you can’t do anything about it.”

-------You can (and should) do something about it…this is what you should do, IMO:

  1. Continue to train yourself to never show any emotion (disappointment, anger, surprise, etc) no matter what happens on the mound.

This is a very useful mind-set for any pitcher: No matter how bad things get…whether my pitching stinks today, or the umpires stink today, or my defense is error-prone today, or whether the opponent is just way better than us today, or some combination of the above…nothing I do on the field will reveal any frustration, anger, disappointment, etc, etc.

  1. Train yourself to appear calm and confident at all times, even if your insides are really feeling the storm.

  2. Give yourself a break–baseball is a game of failure. If your exterior facade of business-like confidence gets shaken up now and then, don’t worry about it…use those moments to learn what really bothers you the most, and train yourself to overcome those types of moments in the future.

  3. Learn how to laugh into your glove when everything is going wrong. Sometimes laughing in the middle of a disaster can really help you to refocus and bear down—but you don’t want your teammates, coaches, and opponents to see you laughing: They may take it wrong. So, put your glove up to your face and have a good laugh–then back to business.[/quote]

actually, i was frustrated, but didn’t express it by throwing my glove, my bat or anything. I laughed a couple times, then regrouped myself. But this guy didn’t call strikes. I was hitting the corners, i was hitting my spots, and he wasn’t giving me anything. I was calm with the ump through the whole game. I never threw my glove nor hat, cause I kept my composure. I was frustrated inside, but never gave any emotions that would be a big sign to the umps.


#4

Hey kenja,

My post wasn’t really meant to suggest that you did let your frustration show…in fact, I was just trying to use your post as a platform for further discussion. It was more like, “this is a very interesting general point for discussion” than “kenja, you must have done this or that”.

Your post is of very widespread interest to pitchers: Do you know of a single pitcher who has never experienced frustration/anger/etc/etc from stuff that happens in baseball? Yes, position players also have these moments, but you can easily argue that pitchers are at the mercy of an umpire’s judgement on nearly every pitch that they throw.

To elaborate further on your comments, not throwing your hat or a bat, or not kicking the Gatorade bucket, or other similar behaviors…is not what I was talking about. Those behaviors are extreme and visible to everyone with eyes and they usually are dealt with by umpires or coaches very quickly.

I was trying to suggest that even some fairly subtle types of poor body language are also seen by umpires as a form of showing them up on the field–and they don’t like it. You know what I’m talking about–you thought you put a 2-2 pitch exactly where you wanted it in the zone, Blue calls “ball three”, and you stare him down for a couple of extra heartbeats…it’s not nearly as overt as throwing something or cursing out loud…but umpires see it, and they hate it.

When your catcher holds the ball for a second too long, to show the umpire that he thought your last pitch was a strike…Blues usually don’t like that too much, either.

You are much better off in the long run if you can train yourself to show no emotion whatsoever in response to any of the umpire’s game calls.


#5

Remember this scene? This was something that happened in the minor leagues, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see it in the majors. Here it is:
Batter gets a pitch called on him that he doesn’t like. He steps out of the batter’s box and faces the plate umpire.
Batter: "What would you do if I called you a meathead, sourpussed old crab?"
Umpire: "I’d run you out of the game."
Batter: "And if I thought you were all that but didn’t say anything?"
Umpire: "I couldn’t do anything."
The batter stands there and stares at the umpire for two full minutes. Then he steps back into the batter’s box and says, "Okay, we can now resume play."
And in my day, the strike zone was a lot larger than it is now, and both the umpire and the pitcher had much more leeway…Nowadays you do what you can. 8)


#6

Yeah that always happens to me. The worst thing i did was throw a fastball right down the middle. And the ump called it a strike and i yelled out “FINALLY!” and my coach sat my down the rest of the game for that. But a lot of these umps are just getting harder to pitch around and usually the only time you get nice calls pitching is when your getting killed or killing a team and he just wants to end the game. So i know how ya feel.


#7

[quote=“laflippin”]
I was trying to suggest that even some fairly subtle types of poor body language are also seen by umpires as a form of showing them up on the field–and they don’t like it. You know what I’m talking about–you thought you put a 2-2 pitch exactly where you wanted it in the zone, Blue calls “ball three”, and you stare him down for a couple of extra heartbeats…it’s not nearly as overt as throwing something or cursing out loud…but umpires see it, and they hate it.[/quote]

I never did nor say anything to show the ump that hes doing the wrong calls. I just caught the ball go back on the rubber to pitch the next pitch.

My catcher did that on a lot of occasions. I could feel his frustration. But i could how annoying that would be, on an ump’s side of view.

I’m pretty good with showing no emotion, I just laugh it off, and I know those are umpire’s judgement calls, but he was just giving me nothing. And I was hitting the zone.


#8

Jim Brosnan, who was the Cincinnati Reds’ closer in the early '60s, tells in his book “Pennant Race” of one such incident during a frustrating ball game; he observed, however, that at least the plate umpire was being inconsistent for BOTH pitchers! That took the edge off the situation somewhat. :slight_smile:


#9

hey dude whats up.

I think what you should do about the tight strike zone would be this:

First throw your pitch and really make sure that it is a strike. If they are missing by a little bit don’t say to yourself that they are strikes really make sure that they are hitting the corners.

2nd if this doesn’t work then just tell your back catcher to ask where each pitch is missing. We had a really really really tight umpire before. Probaly the tighest i have ever seen and trust me each team was feeling the effects of this umpire. Anyways i was catching and i would ask him every pitch where each pitch was missing if it was a strike. The umpire would tell me where he wants the ball either by saying outside, inside, high or low and from their we could decide where his strike zone was.

Trust me you can always do something about it. Don’t let a tight umpire ruin your game or even weekend. Shake it off and make sure you ask your catcher where you are missing.
Hope this helps


#10

[quote=“baseballkid111”]hey dude whats up.

I think what you should do about the tight strike zone would be this:

First throw your pitch and really make sure that it is a strike. If they are missing by a little bit don’t say to yourself that they are strikes really make sure that they are hitting the corners.

2nd if this doesn’t work then just tell your back catcher to ask where each pitch is missing. We had a really really really tight umpire before. Probaly the tighest i have ever seen and trust me each team was feeling the effects of this umpire. Anyways i was catching and i would ask him every pitch where each pitch was missing if it was a strike. The umpire would tell me where he wants the ball either by saying outside, inside, high or low and from their we could decide where his strike zone was.

Trust me you can always do something about it. Don’t let a tight umpire ruin your game or even weekend. Shake it off and make sure you ask your catcher where you are missing.
Hope this helps[/quote]

My catcher didn’t need to ask, the ump himself told the catcher, nope broke too late, a bit outside, too inside, up high. But they were legitimate strikes. And he had like a regular strike zone to a small square box strike zone.[/u]