In season strength workout


#1

Okay so i have gained a lot of muscle in the offseason. I was wondering what kind of routine i could do in the in-season to help me maintain my strength.

Lifts last season:

Bench Press: 130lbs
Deadlift: 190lbs
Squat: 150lbs

Current:

Bench Press:280lbs
Deadlift: 480lbs
Squat: 300lbs(just started squatting 2 months ago)

Anyways here is my workout i keep it simple and just include the basic compound lifts

Mon: Squat, deadlift, bench press
wed: Squat, barbell row, dips
fri: Squat, weighted chin ups, incline dumbell bench press

Each set is 3 sets of 5 reps

For my squats i plan on increasing the weight 5lbs every day for an increase of 15lbs/week(ya i know i am asking alot)

Anyways what do you guys think of my workout.


#2

Stop this workout. If you are in season then you should be worried about staying in shape, not getting stronger. I mean during the off-season you can give yourself rest when you need it, and that’s something you won’t get during the season. Also on my team we have a few guys who played football during the fall/winter and one or more always end up injured because they are more muscle bound than anything else. For baseball you need to be tone and flexible to be successful and avoid injury, if you continue with these workouts odds are you will end up injured. I understand that you want to get big but the time for that is in the off season. If you want an inseason workout do squats and lunges(without weights), push-ups, pull-ups, basically anything you can do with our body just to stay toned. Hope this helped.


#3

I don’t fully agree with the previous post. Yes, you’re in season so your main focus shouldn’t be to get stronger. That doesn’t mean you won’t get stronger, especially if, in the grand scheme of things, you are a relatively new lifter. But you should not push extra hard to increase the weight each lift, just lift hard staying around the same weight as the previous workout and going up in weight if it gets absurdly easy, which it usually shouldn’t. If you can get through a season having lost less than 5lbs and maintained most of your strength then you’ve done a damn good job. But no need to be adding 50 lbs to your squat in season, if baseball is your top priority.

Also, how much weight did you gain? I’m gonna take a wild guess that you gained at least 25-30 lbs which is pretty darn good. Were you following Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe?


#4

You have made some incredible gains in a year congrats. For me squatting 3 times a week is lot on your joints and for in season. I am not sure if you have enough rest to recover for growth. The Squat is a great lift and the best for building body mass/strength and takes the longest to recover from the effects.
It might work for and your body will tell you yes or no.


#5

ya lanky i went from 160lbs to 192lbs, 14 percent body fat. I am now down to 185lbs and around 11 percent body fat. So pretty good.

In the offseason i actually didn’t follow starting strength, i kind of made a customization of my own, according to what equipment i had at home.

Workout that helped me get 32lbs

MON- Chest
Barbell bench press
Incline bench press
Chest flys

Tues- Back
Deadlift
bent over barbell row
one arm dumbell row

wed- off

thurs- shoulders

Standing military press( same effects as the “CLEAN and Jerk”)
dumbell side raises
front raises

fri- arms
Close grip bench press
dips
barbell curls
seated barbell curls

Now you may ask yourself where are my leg workouts. Well i had nothing for legs. Just recently like 3 weeks ago i bought a power rack. Thats why i want to squat 3 times a week. I started squatting at around 205lbs on april 17 and now on may 11, i am going for a 280lb squat. Also this is not a max just a 5-8 reps of 3 sets.

But ya that was my customization.

When everyone on my ball team seen me, they shit there pants, because last year i was 32lbs less.

My coach was asking me if i had shoulder tightness or any problems, with my arms due to my “bulking” up. I told him no.

Also my velociity has increased as well last year i threw 83mph average with a 86mph top velocity. This year i am throwing around 87-88mph average and have hit 90mph a couple of times

I feel when i start doing more power squats and more plyometrics as well as strengthing my core well, not only will my velocity be sustained more but it will take more pressure off my arm allowing me throw longer and be injured free.

In my own experience, i feel there is nothing wrong with bench pressing, or over head pressing as long as you do 5 reps of 5 sets, for strength, and that you are not maxing out

Also sorry for rambling and making this a long message lol


#6

great job with the weight gains. but just remember to spend as much time on leg and core strength as upper body, as it is equally if not more important. also, stretch stretch stretch! getting stronger is obviously a good thing…but muscle growth does make you more stiff. flexibility is extremely important (why do you think you don’t see any buff pitchers???)


#7

Firstly there are a lot of buff mlb pitchers…a huge number of them are in the 6’3" 220 range. Just not many of them are shredded because you don’t really need to be shredded to pitch well. Just look at brian wilson and jonathan papelbon as two examples. Obviously you have exceptions like lincecum who compensate for lack of strength with ridiculous mechanics, but for the most part mlb pitchers are pretty strong. You won’t find many under 200lbs.

Also it’s kind of surprising to me you were able to gain 32 lbs without doing anything for your lower body except deadlifting once a week. You must be extremely top-heavy at this point. Still, its not a good idea to try to overcompensate for that all at once by squatting three times a week. I wouldn’t recommend squatting any more than twice a week, and do different variations on those two days i.e. normal and box squats, or front squats and box squats


#8

you have a much different idea of buff than i do…


#9

you have a much different idea of buff than i do…[/quote]

are you going to elaborate or just leave it at that?


#10

ya i am extremely built in my upper body. My legs aren’t weak even if i don’t work them directly. I hit them once a week with deadlifts, but deadlifts due incorporate your legs in alot of different ways.

And don’t forget recovery is more important then working out more.

Working out only tears the muscle, you gain muscle by recovering and eating a little more food each time. Thus if i only worked my legs out once a week they would get a lot of rest

But i do agree, my legs are a week point, when compared to baseball, since you require your legs for so much. I also have extremely good mechanics.

i am one of those pitchers who learned that you don’t throw harder with just your arm

You need strong, explosive legs, as well as a tight,strong core, to transfer the energy.

I also might switch my routine from 5 sets of 5 reps, maybe to 3 sets of 10 reps

That is more hypertrophy which is muscle gains, so i don’t know. more reps are better for endurance as well so i don’t know


#11

I don’t know why you would train for muscular endurance.


#12

how is working on endurance a bad thing for a pitcher? as i assume most pitchers want to go as deep into a game as possible without their muscles getting tired???..


#13

ya. It was just a thought, doesn’t mean i will do it.

I think going heavy is the way to go though


#14

how is working on endurance a bad thing for a pitcher? as i assume most pitchers want to go as deep into a game as possible without their muscles getting tired???..[/quote]

It’s not a bad thing for a pitcher, but it also depends on what type of pitcher you are. Relievers (outside of long relievers) don’t need to. I’m a closer and I train my body to be explosive, I could care less about my endurance. I don’t even throw a bullpen longer than 35 pitches.


#15

yeah. if you’re a closer then obviously endurance isn’t important lol


#16

i’ve never really felt like pitching requires anything more than a very base level of conditioning. Based on my own experience and looking at some mlb pitchers, (CC Sabathia) I don’t buy the argument that training for endurance should be a high priority in a strength and conditioning program.

If you presented an argument for anaerobic endurance training (low rep training with short rest, for example cluster sets) I might buy it, but 3 sets of 10 as the standard in a baseball strength program seems ridiculous. Pitching demands 12-15 max effort throws in about a 10 minute period followed by a 10-15 minute rest. If you are prioritizing endurance over max strength there seems to be an issue there to me.