If I'm understanding leg and hip power in pitching


#1

Administrators,

If I’m not mistaken from what I was taught in college and the minors…is that a pitcher’s leg and hip power during pitching comes from when the stride foot lands …the hips explode(rotate) towards the plate with the back leg pushing and coming through with the trunk and arm rotation…following …


#2

You, my friend, have learned “THE SECRET”, and it is this: you get the power behind your pitches by getting the whole body into the action. You use the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, I might add, seamless) motion; the arm and shoulder are just going along for the ride, and by doing this not only do you get more power behind your pitches you also take a lot of pressure off the arm and shoulder so that you are throwing harder—and faster—with less effort.
I learned this many moons ago from watching the Yankees’ legendary Big Three pitchers—Raschi, Reynolds and Lopat—and seeing just how they did it. I made a note of it and started working on it on my own, and as I practiced this essential element of good mechanics I found myself doing the same thing they were. And even though I wasn’t much on speed I found myself throwing harder with less effort—how not to get a sore arm, or a sore elbow, or a sore anything else. :slight_smile: 8)


#3

Thanks zito ! I’ m getting to work with young 14-15 yr old pitchers and my main goal is for them to use proper mechanics to avoid flaws that can hurt their arm…and to throw strikes. I will be on here again later tonight and will post for others to see and compare the most common mechanic flaws I’m having to work on . I enjoyed reading your reply zito .


#4

[quote=“TIGJ”]Administrators,

If I’m not mistaken from what I was taught in college and the minors…is that a pitcher’s leg and hip power during pitching comes from when the stride foot lands[/quote]
Agreed. Good tempo down the hill to build up some momentum followed by a strong front leg abruptly putting on the brakes after the front foot plants should result in more explosive hip rotation.

I’d be careful about trying to teach a back leg push. Initially, there is a sideways push with the hip abductor to initiate movment towards the target. And there may be some plantar flexion right before the back foot turns over. But at, or slightly before, front foot plant, the back foot does turn over to allow the hips to fully rotate and there is not pushing going on at that point.


#5

Thanks Roger,…that’s what I’m thinking too, the back foot is really there for the hip explosion (rotation) and then naturally comes forward and around due to the momentum created from the stride and throwing the hips into the delivery…

So leading with the hip and shoulder closed, into the stride, powerfull hip rotation, trunk rotation, then arm comes down and through.