Ice


#1

how many people on here ice regulary after they pitch?? and do you feel it helps your arm also how many days do you do it for until your next start?? i never really iced my arm before but since i ve been in college my coach and trainers make us ice all the time and i was wonderin how much it actually helps thanks!!


#2

I usually ice my arm if i’ve gone through a day where i’ve thrown a lot. Remember to run to flush out the lactic, and do some mobilization exercises once you’ve thrown.

I do cuff exercises after throwing and before icing.


#3

personally i think it helps a lot cause after you throw a lot and u ice it , it gets really num but it really relaxs ur arm and it makes it not as sore so i think its good


#4

i jog a mile or 2 then ice and it makes my arm less stiff and sore the next day


#5

Just like warming, your arm has to cool down. When you ice your arm, It relaxes your mussels and gets them cooler at a fast rate. If you don’t ice your arm, your arm will stay warm over a long period of time which isn’t good.

Although im 14, I know a lot about baseball


#6

I ice on occasion i know it may sound strange but it seems im always “on the chart” and i hate icing a day or even 2 days before i pitch cus i do notice stiffness, the best therapy for me is stretching and running and the arm excersices.


#7

I’ve never iced, and have never had any arm problems… In saying that, will I ice in the future, maybe? But, right now, running, stretching, proper nutrition habits, sleep, and rotator cuff care has done a good job in preventing any injuries, and speeding recovery from pitching…


#8

[quote=“souther32”]Just like warming, your arm has to cool down. When you ice your arm, It relaxes your mussels and gets them cooler at a fast rate. If you don’t ice your arm, your arm will stay warm over a long period of time which isn’t good.

Although im 14, I know a lot about baseball[/quote]

Um…no. Ice will restrict bloodflow to an area, which is why it is used to prevent swelling. Heat will promote bloodflow (so would sprints, poles, and other running). More bloodflow to a muscle will induce healing- and therefore speed up your recovery time.

The main reason that you see ice used so prevalently is because it gets rid of the pain and soreness that come after throwing a long game.

Steven wrote an article on icing a while back…


#9

Hi kc86,

Do you have the URL for the article Steven wrote?


#10

It was mentioned somewhere on the forum previously.
Yes, jogging does get lactic acid out of your system… But, pitching doesn’t create lactic acid. Lactic acid forms after 20+seconds of high stress activities. Does it take 20 seconds to deliver a pitch? Nope.


#11

Here you go dlink. It was the March 21st article
http://www.stevenellis.com/steven_ellis_the_complete/2006/03/should_pitchers.html
.


#12

ice speeds up bloodflow just like running, making the veins expand and promoting more bloodflow, getting the lactic acid out


#13

Ice slows down bloodflow. That is why you put ice on an injury to prevent swelling. When you “warm up” you increase the bloodflow through the body. That is why you do warmup exercises before more strenuous work. That way the muscle have receive enough blood and oxygen to fire at peak levels.


#14

Growing up we didn’t know what ice was other than for ice tea or water. We threw and played baseball every day and we didn’t have arm problems like kids do today. I believe the reason for so many arm problems today is kids do not throw enough when they are young which creates a stronger arm in later years. Throw more. Run more. If your arm starts to hurt it maybe more mechanical than the fact your arm needs ice. I believe the last thing one should look at is, if your arm doesn’t hurt after a game don’t ice it. I also believe if it’s not broke why try and fix it.


#15

Some people ice, some people don’t. If there is pain then most believe that ice will help keep the swelling down. Too much swelling can restrict bloodflow and cause further damage to muscles.

If there isn’t pain then ice will probably reduce bloodflow and slow down healing. However, there are those who believe that applying ice will restrict bloodflow temporarily but the end result will be increased bloodflow as the body tries to warm up the area. In either case the effects are most likely temporary and don’t make a lot of difference one way or the other.

Personally, I believe in staying away from ice unless there is pain. I do believe in running afterwards, not to flush lactic acid but simply to increase overall bloodflow.

If there is pain then ice is probably useful for a short while to avoid excessive swelling.

The bottom line is that there simply isn’t agreement in the health community about exactly when to use or not use ice and everyone has to decide for themselves. Everybody is different and some people might have significant swelling as a result of normal muscle soreness while others might have little or no swelling.


#16

[quote=“LHP32”]how many people on here ice regulary after they pitch?? and do you feel it helps your arm also how many days do you do it for until your next start?? i never really iced my arm before but since i ve been in college my coach and trainers make us ice all the time and i was wonderin how much it actually helps thanks!![/quote]i feel icing your arm and running helps a lot, do it, scouts and coaches like to see it i think, it takes time but its worth keeping your arm healthy right?


#17

I think it’s interesting to note that some major league organizations do not allow their players to ice at all. Most organizations encourage icing, but I know the Diamondbacks for one do not allow their players to ice at all. This is at the minor league level where the trainers can control it. Not really sure what happens at the major league level.

Just very interesting how different teams operate.


#18

it is necessary to ice because it stops the spreading of inflamation and it makes your arm less sore the next day.


#19

[quote=“CADad”]Some people ice, some people don’t. If there is pain then most believe that ice will help keep the swelling down. Too much swelling can restrict bloodflow and cause further damage to muscles.

If there isn’t pain then ice will probably reduce bloodflow and slow down healing. However, there are those who believe that applying ice will restrict bloodflow temporarily but the end result will be increased bloodflow as the body tries to warm up the area. In either case the effects are most likely temporary and don’t make a lot of difference one way or the other.

Personally, I believe in staying away from ice unless there is pain. I do believe in running afterwards, not to flush lactic acid but simply to increase overall bloodflow.

If there is pain then ice is probably useful for a short while to avoid excessive swelling.

The bottom line is that there simply isn’t agreement in the health community about exactly when to use or not use ice and everyone has to decide for themselves. Everybody is different and some people might have significant swelling as a result of normal muscle soreness while others might have little or no swelling.[/quote]

Gentlemen.
The above quote by CADad is excellent.