Ice Danger


#1

There has been studys done in the last year that prove pitchers should not ice there arms after pitching or every. In the study they use ice on the arm and no ice and there is no difference. In fact it could be more dangerous and damage nerves.

http://www.pitching.com/blog/133/should-pitchers-ice-after-they-pitch-not-according-to-the-research/

NEEDS TO BE READ FULLY


#2

best thing to do and always as been is to run a mile and stretch.


#3

i dont know about any1 else… but after i pitch if im sore i do sprints or a few times around the track and i ice. regardless of if it “scientifically” works it makes my arm feel better


#4

No way! If you’re sore, ice. If not, don’t. Plain and simple.

If you’re concerned about nerve damage, ice for no longer than 20 minutes on, 20 minutes off, 20 minutes on, etc. And place a shirt or towel over the shoulder or elbow first, before your put ice on it.

I never iced. But it’s not “poisonous.” So if you’re feeling like you need to ice, do it. No big deal (almost every big league pitchers does it). If you don’t think you need to ice after a performance, don’t.


#5

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]No way! If you’re sore, ice. If not, don’t. Plain and simple.

If you’re concerned about nerve damage, ice for no longer than 20 minutes on, 20 minutes off, 20 minutes on, etc. And place a shirt or towel over the shoulder or elbow first, before your put ice on it.

I never iced. But it’s not “poisonous.” So if you’re feeling like you need to ice, do it. No big deal (almost every big league pitchers does it). If you don’t think you need to ice after a performance, don’t.[/quote]
Regarding nerve damage, Tom House recommends no more that 10 or 15 minutes on the elbow since there is almost no “meat” there. 20 minutes on the shoulder is fine.


#6

The basic premise of the blog entry was that this study points to the ineffectiveness of icing and that there may be more effective things to do. Here’s the quote:

[quote]Should baseball pitchers ice their throwing arms after pitching
in a game. Instead of getting opinions why not look at the research. Based on the research their is no evidence that icing a pitcher’s arm is beneficial.

Pitchers would be better off to do some running for twenty minutes or so while keeping their arms moving to aid flushing the waste products that build up around the joints after pitching.[/quote]

Here’s the “Implications” entry from the abstract of the study:

So, the point of it all is that, since icing is ineffective (at least according to this study and despite what the major leagues have always done), why bother?


#7

Because that’s the way it’s been done for years, and as soon as a non-icing pitcher gets injured, someone (without any scientific basis for this statement) will say that the problem is that he didn’t ice his arm.


#8

Roger Clemens, while recently speaking with players from St. John’s U, said that he ices his elbow for no more than eight minutes, and his shoulder for no more than twelve. I have no idea where he came up with the numbers, but this is information and the article on pitching.com is worth investigating further.


#9

No way, Icing isn’t bad at all. Icing is the best anti-inflammatory there is. I remember reading an article on www.bodybuilding.com that ice is important for recovery. Of course icing for too long can damage nerves but certainly icing 10 minutes won’t.


#10

Doesnt icing the arm stop the micro bleeding in the muscles that doesnt sound bad to me :lol: of course not doing it for long and having something over your arm like alittle towel


#11

The idea of icing is to prevent the inflamation that you get when you create micro-tears by throwing a baseball. The icing slows the blood flow to your arm which reduces the inflamation. But this only works for short periods of time. That is why icing for 20 minutes of the shoulder, off for 20 minutes, and icing for 20 minutes is a good way to prevent inflamation.


#12

running is just as good (if not better than) as icing


#13

why cant you do both?


#14

Again, the point of the article is that it’s ineffective. So, why bother with something that doesn’t work?