I want to play for a D1 NAIA baseball team. But I haven't played on a team in 13 years. Need advice


#1

Hello people of LTP!

I would like advice on how I can prepare to try out as a pitcher for the baseball team at the college that I’m currently attending. I’m going to try out just before the the 2018 season, giving me a year to prepare (I will be able to play for 2 seasons, 2018 and 2019). I haven’t played on a team since since I was 7 (I’m 20). I have playing catch for the last few months after 8 years without even touching a baseball.

What is a good way to develop as pitcher? Is it possible to develop as a decent pitcher for a D1 NAIA team with only a 15 months to practice?


#2

if you’ll make it is almost entirely up o you, how hard and smart you train.

I’d say immdietely start Olympic lifting. Squats, deadlifts, bench, cleans, pull ups ect…

Start to learn about biomechanics. Analyze the small players in the MLB who throw hard.

there’s a lot of different people saying different things, some of which are completely incorrect. To avoid this, I’d reccomend only taking advice from those who use updated scientific studies to give advice.


#3

Thanks for the reply and guidance!

I’m 5’10, 183lbs (skinny arms, thickish legs, and a fat gut) if that means much.


#4

No problem. I forgot to mention, also make sure you look into nutrition. I’d reccomend getting on a nutrition program.

In order to reach your goal, you have to do EVERYTHING right, and (without being too cliché) take no days off. It’s a long shot, but definitely possible.


#5

You are WAY behind the curve…it can be done but you have zero time to dilly-dally with someone who’s clueless.You need to find a good pitching coach! Someone who has demonstrated they know what they’re talking about by having placed multiple pitchers on college teams. Just because they’ve coached baseball for X # of years doesn’t mean they know what they’re doing. You need to find pitchers in your area who are playing at the next level and talk with them about their path to college. They’ve likely had the higher level coaching that you need.