I want this guy on my team

http://backporch.fanhouse.com/2010/04/05/line-drive-destroys-pitchers-knee-doesnt-stop-throw-to-first/?icid=main|main

Hummm won’t let me hi-light the link…oh well…still better info on the tube… :wink:

This is a really short story…the YouTube Vid actually has more info on it so here it is.

What prescence of mind…wow.

That is miserable and being a college pitcher, that is terrifying and another reason why I would love to pitch to wooden bats.

Wow.

The question I have of the NCAA (the same NCAA that takes soooooo many inconsequential molehills and makes them into mountains)…

What happened to the bat of the hitter immediately after this incident occurred?

IMO What should happen, given the history of aluminum bat tampering in college ball, is that the bat should have been confiscated and tested to ensure that its bat exit speed complied with the rules. Why not…? Can you imagine the opportunity for civil action if you were the pitcher and found out that bat was shaved illegally?

Lets say you were Steven Strasburg last year and got smacked in the head with a ball hit by an illegal aluminum bat. Can you spell…15 million?

I think I’d let this guy on my team too :wink:

http://chicago.whitesox.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100405&content_id=9091930&vkey=news_cws&fext=.jsp&c_id=cws

What MLB removed from Youtube, MLB gives to the White Sox on their site :roll:

I will however allow this confused fellow to go to another team…he seems to like Chavez I think I’ll let Venezuala draft him 8)

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/blog/big_league_stew/post/President-Obama-struggles-with-command-still-re?urn=mlb,232140

Sorry Boys and girls I’m on a roll…please…someone hose me off please :shock: :shock:

[size=18]Now this guy[/size]

I’ll listen and pay attention to :lol:
I hope all of the posters take the time to hear just the little things he’s mentioned in this short piece.

http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100406&content_id=9103188&vkey=news_chc&fext=.jsp&c_id=chc

Well like it or not…I’m thinkin this is going to be a reoccurring theme for me…those who exemplify what I think a team needs for players or coaches…who do ya’ll think??? Drop a vid or a link lets get inspired :lol:

[quote=“Dino”]The question I have of the NCAA (the same NCAA that takes soooooo many inconsequential molehills and makes them into mountains)…

What happened to the bat of the hitter immediately after this incident occurred?

IMO What should happen, given the history of aluminum bat tampering in college ball, is that the bat should have been confiscated and tested to ensure that its bat exit speed complied with the rules. Why not…? Can you imagine the opportunity for civil action if you were the pitcher and found out that bat was shaved illegally?

Lets say you were Steven Strasburg last year and got smacked in the head with a ball hit by an illegal aluminum bat. Can you spell…15 million?[/quote]

I doubt it has anything to do with the bat… every year easton and demarini work to make the ball come off their bats faster and travel further. The rebound on these things now a days is ridiculous. It’s great for the hitter, not so great for the guy 60’6" away who has to react to a 110+mph batted ball.

My question for the NCAA is why do they still have (for the most part) extremely athletic, strong, full grown men swinging these things? In high school, sure, but these guys swing way to fast for that to be safe.

In light of the fact that there have been documented violations of the tampering rule, I think it’s reasonable to conduct investigations when a pitcher is injured. When there are so many concerns, why assume anything?

From the NCAA Baseball Rules Committee, May 2009

[quote]VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL
MEMORANDUM
May 19, 2009
TO: Athletics Directors, Compliance Administrators and Head Baseball
Coaches.
FROM: Jim Paronto, secretary-rules editor
NCAA Baseball Rules Committee.
SUBJECT: Bat Alterations.
In an ongoing effort to provide an environment for fair and safe competition, the
NCAA is sharing information it has received dealing with some non-wood
baseball bats. It has come to the attention of the NCAA that there are several
companies that offer to “roll” or “shave” non-wood bats in order to increase the
performance of the bat. This type of alteration apparently improves the
performance of the bat, in some cases considerably.
According to NCAA Baseball Rule 1-12-b: “Any bat that … has been altered or
flattened so as to affect the distance factor or cause an unusual reaction on the
baseball shall be removed from the game.” During NCAA championship
competition, any bat that is found to be in violation of Rule 1-12-b may subject
the team and/or student-athlete to further sanctions under the NCAA’s
championship misconduct policies.
Additionally, NCAA Bylaw 17.33 requires all member institutions to adhere to
the playing rules of the sport in all contests. An institution’s failure to do so may
subject it to penalties from the appropriate championship committee and may
potentially constitute a violation of NCAA Bylaw 10.01.1 (Honesty and
Sportsmanship) and 10.1 (Unethical Conduct).
The NCAA plans to collect and test bats at many sites of this year’s
championships. Any bats found to be out of compliance or showing signs of
altering may not be allowed in subsequent play.
JP:nkb[/quote]

They did collect bats and test bats and it resulted in a memorandum on illegal bat procedures for umpires, a composite bat moratorium and a listing of legal and illegal bats.

Bats can be altered by shaving, rolling, warming and believe it or not counterfeiting (false silk screening). I’ve seen all four methods used.

The NCAA needs to protect the integrity of the game. When you as a college pitcher take the mound against an opponent, you assume certain risks from batted balls. But would you pitch if all manor of non wood bats were permitted and none were illegal? In essence, if you do not perform tests in season, tests when incidents of injury occur and random tests during championships then you might have to move the mound back three feet or play with spongeballs.

I do not want non wood bats banned. I’d love to see a voluntary return to the wood bat not only for tradition sake but also because wood bat performance cannot be altered to the extreme degree that non wood bats can.

Having said all this…yes JD…I’d love to have nine guys like this on my team. How long do you think it will be before he gets back on the mound?

I seem to remember Bob Gibson missed the better part of a year when his was broken in a similar injury. I support getting rid of them above HS… It wouldn’t bother me greatly if they were just banned anyway.

And this my friends, is why you don’t let grown men swing aluminum bats. I honestly don’t understand why colleges still use aluminum. Granted with wood you can still tag a pitcher it’s just inconceivable why things aren’t changing. How many people have to get hurt!?!

Amazing thing is that Gibson pitched to 3 batters after he was hit by the line drive. His toughness is legendary, pitching to 3 batters on that kind of injury

I agree with the idea of removing after high school.

THE FOLLOWING TWO ARTICLES HAVE APPEARED IN BASEBALL AMERICA. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE IF SOME OF US WOULD VISIT HIS WEBSITE AND ADD A COMMENT AND SEND WELL WISHES AND PRAYERS.

http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/gunnarsandberg

[quote]Teams Honor Pitcher In Coma

Posted Mar. 17, 2010 2:14 pm by Nathan Rode
Filed under: Around The Nation
Yesterday, NBC Bay Area reported that a high school pitcher was in a medically-induced coma after being struck in the head by a line drive. Gunnar Sandberg, a junior at Marin Catholic High (Kentfield, Calif.), was able to walk around and converse after the incident. Emergency authorities were still called and Sandberg’s status was monitored closely.

He was then put into a medically-induced coma so doctors could perform surgery to reduce pressure on his brain. He is expected to emerge from the coma in a couple of days.

Last night, Marin Catholic faced Drake High (San Anselmo, Calif.). To honor Sandberg, the teams decided to use wood bats instead of metal.

National Classic Switches To Wood; Sandberg Update

Posted Mar. 30, 2010 12:43 pm by Nathan Rode
Filed under: Around The Nation
In response to Gunnar Sandberg’s recent injury, the tournament organizers of the National Classic have decided to switch to wood bats for this year’s event. The athletic director of Marin Catholic High (Kentsfield, Calif.), a participant in the tournament, sent a proposal to tournament director Steve Gullotti last week. Gullotti forwarded the proposal to participating coaches and received a unanimous response in favor of the switch.

“I had been thinking about it ahead of time,” Gullotti said. “Their athletic director called me and there was no pressure whatsoever. A big part of this was a tribute to their player. We felt the obligation to at least open up the dialogue for further research. Hopefully, down the road, we can make this a wood bat tournament.”
Marin Catholic offered to provide the equipment if the teams agreed to use wood. Each team will be given 15 wood bats for the tournament.

As of Tuesday, March 30, Sandberg had been breathing on his own for over 24 hours. His sister, Kalli, has been blogging updates on CaringBridge.com.

“Another good day for the G man,” she said on March 29. “He is making even more neurological improvements. His right side is really reacting and he won’t let the nurses brush his teeth. Today my dad gave him the home run ball, hit by Tyler Scott in the first wood bat game, to hold and Gunnar grasped onto it and wouldn’t let it go. He is still breathing on his own with out the assistance from the machine …over 24 hours! We are headed in the right direction and I am so proud of my brother for being such a fighter! Thanks again and again for all of your positive thoughts, prayers and blessings!”

The Sandberg family is only releasing statements through their Caring Bridge site, which can be viewed here. Visitors to the site can leave messages and make donations. The family is also selling t-shirts that encourage a switch to wood bats. All proceeds go to the family to help them with medical expenses.[/quote]

I have personal experience with head injuries of this nature. Not only are they terrifying for the patient but the family is really traumatized. When they remove a piece of your skull it gets your attention!