I’ve lost about 10mph after an injury

I’m a senior in high school and last June at the end of our baseball season I was sitting in the low 80s (82-84) Since suffering a shoulder Injury in football this year I haven’t been able to throw nearly as hard (72-74) and it is extremely frustrating. My injury happened on a play where there was no contact to me and I was just trying to lift my arms. I felt what I could swear was a pop and felt a sharp pain in the front/side of my shoulder. The pain went away a couple hours later and I thought nothing of it for a while. About a week later I tried to throw a football and there was that sharp pain again. I went to the doctor and they couldn’t quite figure out what was wrong. They determined I had bone marrow swelling and type 2 impingement in my shoulder with a possible rotator cuff sprain. I began general physical therapy in January and now feel low to no pain when throwing but I have lost my velocity. My mechanics have always been bad: problems with opening up too early and following through late with my arm so I feel they haven’t had any impact on my loss of velocity. I’ve also read about a possible subconscious holding you back from throwing, but I’ve thrown at my absolute max with the same low 70s result. I used to be my team’s ace and fell just short of my schools first trip to state last year. I feel terrible about this knowing without me pitching as hard as I could before we won’t have much of a chance to make it to state this year.

I’m 6’3 235 lbs if that matters at all.

I doubt anything can be done to help now with it being mid season, but any input would be much appreciated.

Thanks for reading

nottheaceanymore,

“I’m a senior in high school and last June at the end of our baseball season I was sitting in the low 80s (82-84) Since suffering a shoulder Injury in football this year I haven’t been able to throw nearly as hard (72-74) and it is extremely frustrating.”

Depending on if you want to play next year in College or continue with football is the only question? You need to look at this as you did not have enough time to actually heal. Shoulders are the slowest because of complexity and peripherally related injuries cause by laxity. This alone takes more time than you gave it.

“My injury happened on a play where there was no contact to me and I was just trying to lift my arms.”

You have 4 rotator cuff muscles with all their tendons traveling thru the middle of the shoulder, these tears small and large also take some time. if you stretched ligaments, their return to normal takes even longer, this is the Laxity .

“I felt what I could swear was a pop and felt a sharp pain in the front/side of my shoulder. The pain went away a couple hours later and I thought nothing of it for a while.”

And just months later you started throwing a baseball that rely heavily on shoulder articulations!
Hmmmm.

“About a week later I tried to throw a football and there was that sharp pain again. I went to the doctor and they couldn’t quite figure out what was wrong. They determined I had bone marrow swelling and type 2 impingement in my shoulder with a possible rotator cuff sprain.”

Ligaments do not have pain receptors, you will not know when you injure them. The pain you feel is from Tendon or muscle and muscle (graded sprains) of one of your 4 rotator cuff muscles. Easily you came back to soon because of senior pressure to play and earn the next level. This angst is unnecessary in all of you with so many next choices you can make. You could have easily and better let this season go and start a real rehab program. You are committed now so just stay put and pick everybody else up!

“My mechanics have always been bad: problems with opening up too early and following through late with my arm so I feel they haven’t had any impact on my loss of velocity.”

Of course your mechanics are bad, so are every one else’s who perform the traditional pathomechanical approach. There are mitigation’s for every bad mechanic! The shoulder mitigation’s that will be effected by your injury within already poor understanding of what is supposed to be done to avoid throwing shoulder injuries need to be known.

They are;

Maintain shoulder alignment of the Humerus with the acroimial line (line that runs from shoulder tip to opposite shoulder tip) during Humeral/Forearm transition (taking it back) and initial rotational forwards power, linear drive, Release and Recovery. This will have you throw more towards “inside of vertical” where your forearm drives closer to your head where you will see your ball side Elbow pop up and your arm finish along side your ball side hip, instead of whipping across your ribs.

This takes striding short, staying tall all the way thru and body rotating a full 175 degrees.

“I’ve also read about a possible subconscious holding you back from throwing”

Ligaments have no conscience, Your adrenaline assisted competitive effort is not controlled by previously set intent as others would have you simply believe.

“ but I’ve thrown at my absolute max with the same low 70s result."

You need to strap on some lite wrist weights and strengthen your shoulder muscles (all) while learning what it takes to throw safely.

I’m 6’3 235 lbs if that matters at all.

Not one little bit. That’s not how quickness works.

“I doubt anything can be done to help now”

Starting with the shoulder alignment problem now will have great benefit now and later.

“but any input would be much appreciated.”

Your the one that has to do something. The best info by an actual expert can be found at DrMikemarshall.com you will not find it anywhere else!

Thanks for reading

Good luck