I Need Advice


#1

I am a Sophmore in a AAAAA High School (becoming a Junior next year). I am 6’0, weigh 210-220. I bench about 240 and squat 370. My coach says i have a chance at Varsity next year but i am not sure what to do to help myself become a more effective pitcher. I can go about 3 innings strong but start losing velocity and my pitches start to hang in the 4th. I want to be a starter next year and be able to go at least 6 innings. I have started to run about 1-2 miles but i am not sure how much i should run. Whats yals advice?


#2

Sample seven-day running program for pitchers

Here’s a sample baseball pitchers running program that I performed in professional baseball. Of course, the days of the week can be adjusted to best meet your own specific needs.

* Monday is a short sprint day. Do 7 sec. sprints, with 15 seconds rest.
* Tuesday is a medium sprint day. Do 15 sec. sprints, with 30 seconds of rest.
* Wednesday is a long sprint day. — Do "full pole" sprints (30 secs.), with one minute rest.
* Thursday is a long run day. — Do 20 to 25 min. "flush" run, at an easy pace.
* Friday is a short sprints day. Do 7 sec. sprints, with 15 seconds rest.
* Saturday is an agility training day. Examples of agility drills include jump rope, agility ladders, and dot drills.
* Sunday is an off day.

Conditioning is no doubt important, but not as important as performing the correct types of conditioning.

That’s how to maximize pitching performance.

This is from another spot on Mr. Ellis’ website. Of course you can vary it anyway you want too. I myself prefer to add 2 more days of the 20 min. run. I just find that it’s a good way of keeping me where I need to be. I would say start with this and as you go on you can plug different things in.


#3

Hey thank. This will help me alot.


#4

What do you throw?
From what arm slot?
Have you charted how you get guys out?
How good is your velocity, control, movement?
Do you have command?

Condidtioning is important but do not make the mistake of equating it to success on the pitching mound,its just a component. The batters don’t care what you bench, neither does the umpire.

If you can give me some concise answers, I will try to give you some ideas, Ian.


#5

[quote=“ian demagi”]What do you throw?
From what arm slot?
Have you charted how you get guys out?
How good is your velocity, control, movement?
Do you have command?

Condidtioning is important but do not make the mistake of equating it to success on the pitching mound,its just a component. The batters don’t care what you bench, neither does the umpire.

If you can give me some concise answers, I will try to give you some ideas, Ian.[/quote]

1.I throw 4 seam, 2-8 curve, and a change up. (Dont ask for speed, cuz i have never been gunned)

  1. I throw from a 120 degrees arm slot

  2. Yes, at school we keep how we get people out. Mine are mostly by groundball.

  3. I dont have alot of movement on my fastball, but i can usually put it where i want it. I have alot of movement on my curve and have good control. And finally i dont have a lot of movement nor control on my change up because its a pitch that i am still working on. As for velocity, I have no idea. I have heard from high 70’s to high 80’s. (Depends on the person that is catching me.)

Are those good enough answers?


#6

120 degree slot? Can you tell me in terms of Overhand , high 3/4’s 3/4’s, low 3/4’s please. Are you a righthander?

To get more movement, you really might consider adding a two seam fastball, this should produce even more ground ball outs. Cheap innings are a wonderful thing for a pitcher.

Is your change 4 seam as well? You might convert it to two seam for more movement.

Your 2-8 curve is trouble for righties but not so bad for lefties. You could consider adding a little more downward movement to your breaking ball.

Keep working on your change-up. If you can leadoff with it for strikes, it will make your fastball look even faster. So when you are tried, sometimes you slow down to speed up. You could use a sequence of firstball change, then the fastone low and in, whala,instant ground to the right side!

As far as not being gunned, As long as you can get it by the 3-4-5 hitters consistently from game to game, you are quick enough in my book.

Let me know, and I will try to help you cook up more misery for batters, Ian.


#7

I disagree with Ian about the change-up. If you only throw a 4-seam fastball, then you should only throw a 4-seam change. Likewise, if you do throw 2-seamers, then it would be OK to start throwing 2-seam changes. The reasoning for this being that the rotation on the ball would be different if you are throwing a 4-seam FB and a 2-seam CH. Similar spins on FB’s and CH’s is what makes the CH an effective pitch. While most HS hitters may not be able to pick up on this, the better hitters that read spins on the ball will be able to figure it out soon enough.

By the way, check out the book “Fastball Fitness” by Tom House and the NPA. It is a book that is full of different pitching specific workouts that are designed to help improve velocity, strength, and endurance. I learned a ton from it and would recommend it to anyone looking for a way to improve upon their pitching.


#8

Hi SP2009
If you really want a GREAT program to help your pitching I’d go into Setve Ellis Blog and check out the TUFF CUFF book he sells.
I got the book and I gotta tell you its great for pitcher conditioning , diet, workouts and pitching programs for off season and in season workouts.
It cost’s around $68 including shipping but lets face it, thats only around 1/4 or 1/2 the price we pay for a good bat, or glove now days that last for one or two years. The Tuff Cuff book lasts a lifetime. All the advice you need is in it. Give it a shot, it’s to your benefit.
Bill


#9

I follow your arguement and it seems sound, but what about throwing both? Ian.


#10

Dear SPBASEBALL2009,

The best way to improve at pitching is to practice pitching. It sounds really simply, but few actually do it. If you do not want to throw off a mound, practice on flat ground. Repeat your delivery and practice from the stretch. If your arm is tired, throw from 45 feet. Try the two-knee style of bullpen and work on release and location. Work on just spinning the curveball in a overhand fashion. Play change-up catch. These are all very simple things, but you have to make time for them. What about pickoffs? You have to practice them as well. The best bet is to get a partner and just work after practice with these things. Best things to remember:

  1. Repeat an up-tempo Delivery
  2. Throw for endurance, throw for strength
  3. Be comfortable in the stretch, so practice throwing out of it.
  4. Be comfortable picking people off.
  5. Have your body always ready to go.