I need a new secondary pitch


#1

I’ve been throwing fastballs and curveballs for about a year. My travelball coach recently told me to not throw curveballs to preserve my arm. I have a good 65mph fastball but I know I cant strike people out with only that. Can someone suggest me a good secondary pitch?


#2

changeup!


#3

[quote=“scorekeeper”]CHANGEUP![/quote] Change ups are a problem for me. I have great location with my fastball and had with my curveballs but I’ve tried lots of changeup grips and I just cant throw em for strikes


#4

Then work on it, learn to develop your pitches.


#5

My wise and wonderful pitching coach—an active major-league pitcher—told me that just about any pitch could be turned into a nice changeup, and he demonstrated several for me and showed me how to throw them. Here are a few ideas, many of which I latched on to and incorporated into my arsenal.
First, the palmball (this is the one often referred to as the “Bugs Bunny” changeup). I acquired this at age twelve, and very effective it was too. This pitch is one of the easiest to work with, because you throw it with exactly the same motion as for the fastball, no ifs, ands, buts or bases on balls! You grip the ball with all four fingers on top and the thumb underneath, sort of cutting the ball in half. You grip it well back in the palm of your hand, hence the name—but don’t grip it too tightly, because you don’t want to squeeze the juice out of it! You can change speeds on it by holding the ball a little more loosely or relaxing the grip, but remember, you still have to throw it with the same arm motion and the same arm speed!
You might get around your coach’s admonition with a knuckle-curve. This is a most devastating pitch which comes in there looking for all the world like a fastball but then suddenly drops, like a glass crashing to the floor and shattering into little bits and slivers. You use any of several knuckleball grips, and throw it like a curve—I threw mine with a sharp karate-chop wrist snap, and you should have heard the batters as they swung and missed by a mile. SUCH language! And if you ask me, I think your coach is all wet.
The splitter is another good one. It’s actually a first cousin to the forkball, but it’s easier to throw because you only spread your fingers wide enough so that they’re off the seams. And you throw that one exactly like the fastball, nothing complicated about that…So there you have it: three possibilities for extra pitches to work up and work with. Let’s see—a fastball, a slider and one or more changeups—you’re all set! Get in there and get the batters out. :baseballpitcher:


#6

[quote=“Zita Carno”]My wise and wonderful pitching coach—an active major-league pitcher—told me that just about any pitch could be turned into a nice changeup, and he demonstrated several for me and showed me how to throw them. Here are a few ideas, many of which I latched on to and incorporated into my arsenal.
First, the palmball (this is the one often referred to as the “Bugs Bunny” changeup). I acquired this at age twelve, and very effective it was too. This pitch is one of the easiest to work with, because you throw it with exactly the same motion as for the fastball, no ifs, ands, buts or bases on balls! You grip the ball with all four fingers on top and the thumb underneath, sort of cutting the ball in half. You grip it well back in the palm of your hand, hence the name—but don’t grip it too tightly, because you don’t want to squeeze the juice out of it! You can change speeds on it by holding the ball a little more loosely or relaxing the grip, but remember, you still have to throw it with the same arm motion and the same arm speed!
You might get around your coach’s admonition with a knuckle-curve. This is a most devastating pitch which comes in there looking for all the world like a fastball but then suddenly drops, like a glass crashing to the floor and shattering into little bits and slivers. You use any of several knuckleball grips, and throw it like a curve—I threw mine with a sharp karate-chop wrist snap, and you should have heard the batters as they swung and missed by a mile. SUCH language! And if you ask me, I think your coach is all wet.
The splitter is another good one. It’s actually a first cousin to the forkball, but it’s easier to throw because you only spread your fingers wide enough so that they’re off the seams. And you throw that one exactly like the fastball, nothing complicated about that…So there you have it: three possibilities for extra pitches to work up and work with. Let’s see—a fastball, a slider and one or more changeups—you’re all set! Get in there and get the batters out. :baseballpitcher:[/quote]

   I tried the splitter in my backyard with the grip that is like a 2 seam but wider and with no fingers on the bottom of the ball, and ring finger on the side and it's really easy for me to control and I like the downward break. Thanks for suggesting it.

#7

How old are you?

I’d be more concerned with developing more velocity depending on your age.

Don’t give up on the change up, if you develop it it’ll turn into a pitch you love to have, especially if you get the velocity up on you FB.


#8

[quote=“Wales Diesel”]How old are you?

I’d be more concerned with developing more velocity depending on your age.

Don’t give up on the change up, if you develop it it’ll turn into a pitch you love to have, especially if you get the velocity up on you FB.[/quote]

I’m 13, my fastball is above average. It’s the location that gets hitters though.


#9

If your FB is truly above average, then the pitch that would most compliment it is the CU. But don’t believe what anyone here says, and go ahead and try every conceivable other pitch as a secondary pitch. While you’re on that wild goose chase, other pitchers will be getting the time on the mound and you’ll be left with little more than mop up innings because you’ll be a pitcher with 1 decent pitch and nothing to go to when times get tough.

What I’m saying is, don’t be a hardhead. Almost every conceivable pitch available is at least as difficult to master as a CU, and most are even harder because they have so much more movement.

Good luck.


#10

65 MPH would be dead last in velocity in the starting rotation on our facility’s 13U baseball team.

How hard do you expect to be throwing as a HS freshman?

My suggestion is the best secondary pitch you can have as a 14 year old is an 80 MPH fastball that you can spot in 3 or more locations 80%+ of the time. Then you won’t need much else.


#11

[quote]I’m 13, my fastball is above average. It’s the location that gets hitters though.


62-65 mph 4-seam
53-57 mph splitter
B-team and travel ball[/quote]

Sorry but 62-65 is not an above average fastball. Keep working to develop the change. But develop the fastball first.


#12

While 65 may not be blazing fast for a 13-14 year old, its not too shabby. Keep developing it. One thing I’ve always thought is a fastball from over the top and a fastball from the side are two different pitches. So for a quick addition just change your arm slot every now and again. Learn the darn change up. Another one is moving your fastball. Try getting some tailing action on a two-seam fastball, or a cutter moving in on a lefty. Then learn those from two arm slots and you’ll have about ten different pitches. But seriously, learn the change up.


#13

Why do people keep asking this question? Seriously, every pitcher needs an off speed unless they have a thunderbolt for an arm and ungodly breaking stuff (got those analogies as I watch Bull Durham) if you have problem throwing one then work on it, your not going to be successful unless you work on your weaknesses


#14

Why do people keep asking the same questions again and again? Perhaps it’s because they have nothing better to do with their time. And no matter how many different answers they get, they keep doing the broken-record routine.
The simple, basic fact is that even if a pitcher has an absolute howitzer for an arm and every pitch in the book, including the kitchen sink, he still has to have a changeup or two in his repertoire. And if he fails to accomplish this he will run the risk, every time he steps on the rubber, of being belted around from here to Timbuktu and back by batter after batter who sits on the fastball. Now, I’m well aware that you don’t have every pitch in the book—but you certainly could use a good changeup or two, so go ahead and learn one and learn to use it effectively. And there are quite a few to choose from: the palmball, often referred to as the “Bugs Bunny” change; the knucklecurve; the splitter…none of which will put any stress and strain on your arm or shoulder. So pick one and work on it. 8)