I need a new pitch


#1

I’m on the freshman team in high school, and i’m the starting centerfielder and had never pitched before, but in our last game my coach put me in because the game was a blowout, i ended up throwing 2 2/3 with 0 ER throwing just a high 60s-low 70s fastball. So naturally my coach wants to pitch me more.

I’d like to add another pitch or 2… I need some recommendations for what pitches are effective/easy to learn at my level.

thanks to anyone that can help


#2

Circle Change / Outside half of plate or better.


#3

Do you throw a two seam fastball? If not, start there, work on getting the ball to move. That will give you 4 seam and two seam, same basic motion, not a lot of head sweat involved. Next up, develop a changeup, like Cbird said. Best pitch in baseball. thrown like you’re throwing your hardest fastball, it will screw up the hitter’s timing and make that low 70’s fastball look much hotter when you do decide to throw it!

For info on how to throw those pitches mentioned, search this website. Lots of great input to dig up here.


#4

2-Seamer/Sinker or Circle Change are both good pitches. 2-Seamer is probably the easier of the two to learn.


#5

I would also condier the curve. It changes when the ball arrives and where the ball arrives,Ian.


#6

Do you think he should try to learn a curve in the limited time available to him?


#7

Do you think he should try to learn a curve in the limited time available to him?[/quote]

Probably not.

It’s a good pitch, but can take time to learn.


#8

[quote=“MBradyCF33”]I’m on the freshman team in high school, and i’m the starting centerfielder and had never pitched before, but in our last game my coach put me in because the game was a blowout, i ended up throwing 2 2/3 with 0 ER throwing just a high 60s-low 70s fastball. So naturally my coach wants to pitch me more.

I’d like to add another pitch or 2… I need some recommendations for what pitches are effective/easy to learn at my level.

thanks to anyone that can help[/quote]

As others have said, the 2-seam fastball is a good pitch to try next. You should also try different changeup grips. If the circle / OK grip works, stay with it. If you have trouble with controlling it, try a pitchfork grip or a palmball-type of grip (all fingers on the ball). Throw it just like your fastball and aim low.


#9

Chris,

You and I are never going to agree on this. As a freshman, he has time to learn the pitch. I was not suggesting that it would be the first. He does not even have to learn it for this year, but he better come up with one at some point in his High School career.

Chris, most guys that succeed at the highest level throw breaking balls. There are not many fastball/ changeup pitchers that have been successful.
Pedro Martinez, Mario Soto, John Franco, & Tom Glavine , I will give you. The first 2 had tremendous fastballs. Franco had excellent movement and was left handed, Glavine excellent /world class control. So there are exceptions, but the big divider is the breaking ball.

It is what keep many batters from advancing to the Show, and some to triple A.

This was the sheer idiocy of Dan O’Brien a few years ago when he issued an order to the Reds organization that all minor league batters were to take the first pitch. Guess what the batter is going to be seeing very soon after the Reds spotted evey pitcher strike one? A breaking ball!

I will agree the slider is easier to learn, but he is too young for the stress on his arm. Ian


#10

[quote=“ian demagi”]Chris, You and I are never going to agree on this. As a freshman, he has time to learn the pitch. I was not suggesting that it would be the first. He does not even have to learn it for this year, but he better come up with one at some point in his High School career.

Chris, most guys that succeed at the highest level throw breaking balls. There are not many fastball/ changeup pitchers that have been successful.
Pedro Martinez, Mario Soto, John Franco, & Tom Glavine , I will give you. The first 2 had tremendous fastballs. Franco had excellent movement and was left handed, Glavine excellent /world class control. So there are exceptions, but the big divider is the breaking ball. It is what keep many batters from advancing to the Show, and some to triple A.

I will agree the slider is easier to learn, but he is too young for the stress on his arm. Ian[/quote]

I agree that a curveball is a good pitch, but it takes time to learn.

He specifically asked for a pitch that can be learned relatively quickly but can still be effective. I think a 2-seam fastball (aka sinker) best fits that bill. You’re never going to go wrong by learning to pitch down in the strike zone.

Other options include a cut fastball (that moves in either direction) or possibly a split-fingered fastball (depending on the size of his hands).

I never advocated that he learn the slider. I prefer a good sinker or curveball for a variety of reasons.


#11

I would say go with the 2 seam fastball, its a good pitch when thrown right. Often it will be anywhere from 2-4 mph slower than your 4 seamer, depending on your volocity. So I would try that then go for the change up, Id save the curveball for a maybe a summer league team.


#12

i say learn a change up its exactly the same as fastball mechanics just different grips experiment with it… learnin a curve ball can take you a while and you can injure yourself doing it if your doing it the wrong way… like i did last year (lots of elbow pain)