I have a question on Mechanics


#1

Hello everyone I’m a 18 year old RHP and I’ll be entering my first year of college.

I had a question on mechanics for pitching:

I’m sure most of you have heard of Jonathan Papelbon, the closer of the Phillies and was on the championship winning Red Sox team. If you watch his mechanics closely, you will notice that when he comes set in the stretch he starts his left foot a few inches in front (towards 3rd base) of his right foot. He then appears to step straight in his delivery thus maintaining those few inches to the right throwing across his body. But is he really throwing across his body? Because yes he is starting out like that but he is stepping straight. It’s not as drastic as Jered Weaver of the Angels.

I recently figured out that I was stepping a little open thus flying my front shoulder open and having my arm drag and end up pushing the ball. Obviously, it took away from my control and velocity. So, I started to do what Papelbon is doing and I have seen a big improvement in my control and my velocity is back. It has also allowed me to get my hips into the ball now as well.

I was just wondering if this could have any ill effects on my arm. Thanks.


#2

Hello, Gas City. You know, you are not the first one to post a question that really belongs in another part of the forum—in this case, you should have posted in “Pitching Mechanics”, because this inquiry is about that. Anyhow, you mentioned something in Papelbon’s delivery. I’ve never seen him pitch, and indeed I haven’t seen him in recent months, but now I wonder if he’s throwing sidearm and trying to use the crossfire—could you elaborate on this? 8)


#3

I recently figured out that I was stepping a little open thus flying my front shoulder open and having my arm drag and end up pushing the ball. Obviously, it took away from my control and velocity. So, I started to do what Papelbon is doing and I have seen a big improvement in my control and my velocity is back. It has also allowed me to get my hips into the ball now as well.