HS senior LHP mechanics s/p ulnar nerve transposition

My son has been working with a well respected pitching coach. He has done a some good things in the few weeks. He is about 5 months post op from ulnar nerver transpostion surgery.

He has a low 3/4 delivery and has a tendency to over counter rotate. He then rotates his trunk horizontally opening him up too much. He need to get more vertical tilt. In this video he felt like he was over exagerating tilting back so he can rotate forward and laterally. Any suggestions or feedback to help him with this situation.

The pitching coach says it as simple as releasing straight down and not cutting across. He has him doing drills where he stands straight in front of him and wants his pitching hand to pass straight down through and nut cut across. Any suggestions or feedback would be appreciated.

in slow mo

The counter-rotation in the videos above doesn’t look like an issue.

Trying to “release straight down” is really a change of arm slot which may make things worse for the elbow assuming the current slot is what’s best for it. My thinking is that the problem starts earlier in the delivery and has to do with timing.

Got a side view?

“My son has been working with a well respected pitching coach(former major league all star).”

Is your son still working with this professional?

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]“My son has been working with a well respected pitching coach(former major league all star).”

Is your son still working with this professional?

Coach B.[/quote]

Coach B,

He has worked with him one lesson/week for the past three weeks. His high school season starts today and he only gives lessons during the week(Mon-Thurs). He is also the most expensive in the area for a 30 minute lesson.

It is going to be hard to get lessons in as he is 45 minutes away. We do like that he uses video on the spot and that is one of the reasons we decided to give it a shot. I was just looking for some extra eyes to pick up on anything.

Roger,

Maybe it is changing an arm slot issue. However, he does not ask him to come over the top more, he just wants him to finish more downward with his arm. He does have a tendency to miss left and right. Mostly high and away. Do you feel his glove side is pulling in and to the side too much?

The reasons for my asking orbits this –

You and your son should have a detailed itinerary, prescribed by collaboration among your family’s general practitioner, the surgeon(s) and your son’s physical therapist(s). That itinerary should have progressive, do-n-don’t routines, for certain restrictive movement, exercises, nourishment, medication and so forth.
You and your son should be documenting this experience, day by day. Then, periodic consultations, either over the phone or in person with all or certain members of the professional medical group that I itemized above.

Your son should receive a written statement that he is allowed to pitch – and specifically stating pitching. The medical group that is attending your son should know up front that he is pitching, and competitively at that.

You should have video of your son pitching, before and after his surgery. You should also collect your son’s penmanship – his signature in particular, again, before then after his injury.

Now to address your son’s work with the professional pitcher

-Why the conditions?
Your son’s pitching coach should be brought up to speed on everything relating to your son’s prescription as dictated by his professional medical group. He should also know up front how your son’s injury came about, how long did your son wait before seeking medical help, what did your son do for physical activity prior to seeking medical help, what was the initial diagnosis, how to deal with it, and what decisions were left in your lap to be decided on.
This pitching coach should also have privilege seeing the daily routines that your son was left with for recuperation and what was the initial time period given for recuperation – then was it adjusted along the way – and why?
Your son’s pitching coach should have either agreed with taking on your son as a trainee – and why? He should have given you in writing exactly what he planned to instruct your son in, what steps along the way that he planned take in consideration of your son’s situation, and at what point – if any- he would shut your son down. He should also volunteer a written outline of his professional observations during your son’s time with him – to the medical team collaborating on your son’s behalf. These professional observations by the pitching coach can be invaluable witness to your son’s rehabilitation progress.

Why the condition?
Pitching is a stress load specific activity that dictates a healthy body in total.
Injuries only complicate the subject, not to mention going into a coaching/training environment. So, you’re being up front with his medical staff as well as keeping his pitching coach in the loop. All in all, everything is focused on helping your son. In addition, a written statement may be mandatory as prescribed by the school board or other governing body that sets forth the parameters for sports participation.

Why the ?
I’ve been involved in the rehab programs of mature pitchers for some time. I always start off with what things looked like a few years prior to an injury, then any activity …. ANY activity, after said injury. Sometimes I can pick up why an injury happened, thus my dialog with all concerned is an educated one. Thus, I’m not shooting in the dark or going into something blindly. So, basically I look for a foundation to start with, then go from there. But, never by myself. I always involve myself with others in the medical field and like. I also want a collection of a man’s penmanship – his signature in particular, again, before then after his injury.
Why?
The shoulders, arms, elbows and wrists are the most flexible parts of the body. They are also exposed and vulnerable to all kinds of stress, bruises and sprains. Hence, their construction and development can speak volumes for the motor skills of an athlete, as that athlete grows and experiences life.

To wrap this all up – your son’s pitching coach, being from the professional game, will find all that I’ve posted here as no surprise. In fact, he’ll find all of this, old news. He’s been through this stuff over and over again.

Which brings me to a final note – not related to your son’s injuries. This pitching coach that your son has, is from the pro game. A hard knocks, no-nonsense kind of life style that finds no humor being played. Being played !!! Yes being played. Going to others for advice, then going back to this man and bouncing this-or-that around, suggestions from others, may not sit well with this man. Be careful. On the other hand, there may be nothing to it. Only you know the situation.

By the way, I’ve had experience with pitchers that have gone through similar injuries that your son has had. Their recuperation has been a bit tricky and lengthy. Their life style, self-discipline, and to a certain extent – available money, didn’t help matters. As for my involvement – I walked.

Coach B.

After reading my posting, I should mention – I hope my posting here relative to your questions did not come off as challenging, personally. I’m not use to dealing with the amateur game all that much, so sometimes my remarks can be very short , all business, and without a kind of hospitality to them. If my remarks and comments were a bit abrasive, I apologize.

Coach Baker

Coach B,

My son has been cleared to pitch from his sports medicine orthopedic surgeon. He has been going to physical therapy 3 times/week for 5 months and completed his throwing program. It is typically a 3-5 month recovery. The pitching coach has had this surgery himself so he is aware of the rehab.

His ulnar nerve would pop out of place and flare up occasionally prior to the surgery. It happened twice last year with conservative treatment and physical therapy it came back. We decided to opt for surgery so he could continue his baseball career beyond high school.

I am not looking to “play” his pitching coach. However, he is open to any questions or discussions we bring up with him. I hope this clarifies some things.

[quote=“Roger”]

Got a side view?[/quote]

Here is a side view. I know he does not get his momentum going soon enough during leg lift. He has been working on it.

change up from the rear

[quote=“parkee99”]Roger,

Maybe it is changing an arm slot issue. However, he does not ask him to come over the top more, he just wants him to finish more downward with his arm. He does have a tendency to miss left and right. Mostly high and away. Do you feel his glove side is pulling in and to the side too much?[/quote]
How/where the arm finishes is a direct consequence of the arm slot. It will be hard for him to finish low when his arm is coming mostly around the side.

There could be some pulling or flying open of the glove - I’d want to see higher frame rate video. I can do 300 or 600 fps with my camera - if you’re willing to drive over to the northwest valley, I’d be happy to get you some slower-mo video.

Check Lopez’s glove positioning in this video. He keeps it out front a bit longer and keeps it in front of his torso more. This might be a good model for your son to see:

[quote]How/where the arm finishes is a direct consequence of the arm slot.

There could be some pulling or flying open of the glove - I’d want to see higher frame rate video. I can do 300 or 600 fps with my camera - if you’re willing to drive over to the northwest valley, I’d be happy to get you some slower-mo video.


[/quote]

Thanks Roger,

I will pm you to see when you are available which will coincide with his schedule.

Hello, just had a quick question about your sons ulnar nerve transposition surgery, did the surgery help him and get him to be symptom free? and if so, was he able to throw harder after the surgery or how is the surgery affecting him today? please send me some feedback thank you!

pitching101,

Seven years later won’t get a response but here is the usual outcomes of this simple translocation that should be a shorter and successful outcome every time.

“did the surgery help him and get him to be symptom free?

It will mitigate the problem of forearm supinating the drives of you’re Cutter, Slider
and Curve that cause Ulnar nerve irritation at the back of the Elbow! It will not eliminate the other many pathologies that arise from continuing to replicate the “outside of vertical” pathomechanics that gave him the problem in the first place and as seen continued to produce.

“was he able to throw harder after the surgery or how is the surgery affecting him today? “

Pitchers immediately respond to not having their fingers go numb any more and with in 6 weeks should be nominally applying force. * weeks to maximal effort.

Pulling down and across to recover because you previously produced ”forearm fly out” and intuitive forearm supinated pathomechanical drives can change to “forearm drive in” that is intuitive to forearm drive healthy pronation that does not flop the Ulnar nerve!

Pop the Elbow up during drive and recovery not DOWN!

so it did help him overall?