How to pronate the arm


#1

Can anybody give me an explanation of how to pronate for pitches like the sinker and circle change? I’ve heard many different things, such as its only the wrist, to have the back of the elbow facing up… Ect. And not really from sources that I’d trust.


#2

Focusing on the elbow seems awkward to me. I prefer putting the focus on the hand (finishing thumb down /palm out) or the ball (putting spin on it).


#3

Pronation occurs naturally, even with a curveball. Just don’t be stiff and don’t resist the pronation.


#4

Ok, now we need some clarification. CoachPaul is correct that the throwing arm will pronate on its own after ball release - regardless of which pitch is thrown. There’s nothing to think about to make that happen. However, there are some pitches (e.g. sinker and circle change) that are thrown with some pronation prior to ball release. These do require a conscious attempt to make that happen. Again, I prefer the focus to be on the hand or the spin you wish to impart on the ball.

Two things to watch out for:

(1) Don’t alter your posture to try to pronate beyond what your flexibility allows.
(2) Don’t allow your arm to sweep across in front of you as a result of your attempt to pronate. Make sure your arm throws through to your target.


#5

What do you mean by “sweep across”? It was to my understanding that you throw “across” your body. I’m assuming you mean prematurely do this?


#6

I mean, for a RHP, don’t let your hand move right-to-left. As a RHP attempts to throw a pronated pitch, he tries to get his hand around the left side of the ball while his hand moves toward home plate. But if he gets careless (possibly due to fatigue) he can let the act of pronating push his hand across his body from throwing arm side to the glove side.

Easier to demonstrate in person than to explain in text.