How to prevent Injury?


#1

Im 14 years old and normally go 3-5 inning with between 40-65 pitches, Is this a normal amount of pitching? I don’t normally feel any soreness (at all) afterwards, but what precautions should I take to prevent Injuries?


#2

That’s more than fine, just have a routine. I’m a relief pitcher and do band work after an appearance, reps and sets depending on pitches and running fin over 2 innings pitched


#3

Thanks!


#4

TheDeathlyhallows,

if you are really serious, here it is!

“Im 14 years old and normally go 3-5 inning with between 40-65 pitches”
“ Is this a normal amount of pitching?”

Do you understand the difference between Chronological age and Biological age?

If you are and Equated maturer (Biological age matches your Chronological age) your Elbows growth plates are still building bone length until they close at Cyo/Byo 16 yo.

If you are a delayed maturer a year or 2, you are biologically still 13 or even 12. These people grow for a longer time but are exposed to keeping up with Equated or even Advanced biological maturer’s and worse yet train with those athletes the same way.

Assess your biological age or get help doing so, so you can plan all training and competitive oppertunities by your actual biological age. Show this answer to your mother so she can make dad understand this?

If you are an advanced maturer as much as 1 or 2 years these pitch count numbers are OK only if you do not perform pathomechanically. You should be pitching no more than 2 times thru the lineup, once a week, only 4 straight months a year! All other times of the year ( late July thru Jan.) should be spent training into light regression ”Sport specifically”, not playing adrenaline assisted competitions that produce little in comparison. This means if you are training correctly, you are not able to show in camps, tryouts, show cases or Tourny’s because you can’t physically, never break training for useless activities that are marketed.

“ I don’t normally feel any soreness (at all) afterwards, but what precautions should I take to prevent Injuries?”

I never hurt my arm and have been pitching since I was 8, I am 65 now and still pitch competitively.

I do have this malady caused from pitching to much to early, My Humerus on my throwing arm is ¾ of an in shorter than my Glove arm and my Elbows range of motion is short by 18 degrees in both directions, that’s a 36 degree loss. Here’s the kicker, everybody gets to enjoy this whom produced pathomechanical force applications and it is irreparable.

I would suggest you seek out the only real expert in the field with the credentials necessary to give you merited answers. I use Dr. Mike Marshall for all my injury knowledge and therefore mitigation of those problems for my clients. It’s free

Here are the main injury preventing and power producing tenets;

  1. Be sport specifically fit.

  2. Keep the ball arm and glove arm above the field drivelive at all times during the lengthening kinetic chain, shortening kinetic chain and recovery Kinetic chain! Eliminates shoulder pathologies

  3. Have your Humeral/Forearm arrival to full length simultaneously sync with glove side foot plant (benchmark) to activate the walking response sinuously. Eliminates UCL degradation!

  4. At bench mark arrival with the forearm supinated and ball at driveline height (head high) (outwardly rotated) the start of the first acceleration phase (rotational) you can now voluntarily forearm pronate all your pitch types. Mitigates All aspects of Elbow pathologies.

  5. Stay tall thru the whole delivery and recovery by rotating off the front side leg

  6. Recover your arm by decelerating it in line with the field driveline. Eliminates deceleration pathologies!

good luck in the future.


#5

Try a new technique called Power-Pronation. A throwing method based on physics in connection with biomechanics. Reduces the stress experienced on the Tommy John (UCL) ligament as the arm goes into external rotation. Power-pronation offers the thrower a “natural” degree of pronation and not the over-pronation seen by many pro pitchers. If pro and amateur baseball instructors understood some simple principles in physics we wouldn’t see so many needless arm injuries. See attached jpegs: