How to get the throwing arm back and up?


#1

my son recently got in some trouble throwing the ball. he lost speed and accuracy. i took him to an ex-major league pitcher for a lesson. he told him that when he breaks his arm doesn’t swing back and then up on top to drive the ball down in the strike zone. it looked like he was a field goal post. his elbow stayed on one plain. is there some type of correction or exercise he can do to bring his arm back, up, and threw?

                                            thanks

#2

Just to be clear, are you saying that your son’s problem is a loss of speed and accuracy?


#3

My recommendation, and I know Chris will disagree and come at this from a different viewpoint, is that you should review as much video of guys like Roger Clemens, Mariano Rivera, John Smoltz and Kevin Brown as possible to learn about the arm action that involves going THROUGH a horizontal W position just prior to the front foot turning over to land, then THROUGH the infamous high cocked position, then looping (sorry Chris :smiley: ) back, down, forward and up and over to release and beyond.

If you need some of those videos, just let me know and I’ll email them to you.


#4

listen to dm59, hes a guru. the horizontal w is key here.


#5

[quote=“Redsox04”]listen to dm59, hes a guru. [/quote]Oh noooo!!! Not the “g” word! :shock: :oops: I’m not even close guys. Just a dad who’s done several years of daily study from as many sources as possible. A lot of looking and just as much discussing. But thanks for the compliment nonetheless.


#6

While many big-league pitchers do do this, I don’t think it’s the place to focus on as the solution to the problem.

Instead, I would focus on the action of the lower body. In particular, whether the rotation of the hips is leading the rotation of the shoulders.


#7

can you explain the w for me? it was a loss of speed and accuracy because he had his throwing arm all the way towards first base (being a rhp) if not further. it was almost like playing catch-up.


#8

Are you saying that his arm is lagging behind his body? Does he miss up and in a lot? If so, you might want to have him break his hands sooner.

Also, does he rotate his shoulders before throwing the ball?


#9

BREAKING YOUR HANDS SOONER DOES NOT HELP , it will just make the arm slow and lag behind his body even more.


#10

I agree Redsox04.

I find that many kids have their throwing hand lag at the top. There is usually more than one reason for this. Breaking the hands too soon combined with the “staying back” cue, which gets misinterpreted a lot by kids, often causes the hand to get up there far too early, before the front foot lands. The body’s not ready to throw but the hand is there already.

Many kids allow the front leg to come down from knee lift with no front hip drive at all. They are trying to keep their weight back as they’ve been told. As a result, the hand’s doing all kinds of moving but the centre of gravity’s not. A timing nightmare.

You need to experiment with the timing of the parts but you must ensure that the front hip is driving toward the plate early. All of the MLB pitchers I have videos of have the hip moving just as the knee has reached it’s highest point and is about to start descending. Some even start it before the knee has reached it’s highest point (Wagner, Ryan from the windup, Rivera). The most important tool you’ll have is trial and error with video to be able to analyze the timing in slow motion. It’s amazing how much more you see with slow motion than you can at full speed. Lots of video with experimentation regarding the timing of hand break and the tempo of the overall delivery.

Yet again, I’ll recommend a holistic approach. Recommending making hand break earlier or later will only address one contributing factor. This is a very dynamic and somewhat complex motion that really shouldn’t be “chunked” down to individual bits.


#11

[quote=“dm59”]I agree Redsox04.

I find that many kids have their throwing hand lag at the top. There is usually more than one reason for this. Breaking the hands too soon combined with the “staying back” cue, which gets misinterpreted a lot by kids, often causes the hand to get up there far too early, before the front foot lands. The body’s not ready to throw but the hand is there already.

Many kids allow the front leg to come down from knee lift with no front hip drive at all. They are trying to keep their weight back as they’ve been told. As a result, the hand’s doing all kinds of moving but the centre of gravity’s not. A timing nightmare.

You need to experiment with the timing of the parts but you must ensure that the front hip is driving toward the plate early. All of the MLB pitchers I have videos of have the hip moving just as the knee has reached it’s highest point and is about to start descending. Some even start it before the knee has reached it’s highest point (Wagner, Ryan from the windup, Rivera). The most important tool you’ll have is trial and error with video to be able to analyze the timing in slow motion. It’s amazing how much more you see with slow motion than you can at full speed. Lots of video with experimentation regarding the timing of hand break and the tempo of the overall delivery.

Yet again, I’ll recommend a holistic approach. Recommending making hand break earlier or later will only address one contributing factor. This is a very dynamic and somewhat complex motion that really shouldn’t be “chunked” down to individual bits.[/quote

PERFECT POST!!


#12

Thank you chinmusic. I try. :smiley:


#13

Try hell! You smacked that one out of the park!!! In fact Bud Selig himself may be at your door soon with his testing kit!


#14

Try hell! You smacked that one out of the park!!! In fact Bud Selig himself may be at your door soon with his testing kit![/quote] :lol: Yeah, maybe if that’s a psychological testing kit!!! :lol: