How much running should a pitcher do?


#1

I am a pretty Keen runner I was running about 10km a day or 6.2 miles but being only 150 pounds I knew I had to start building muscle, apparently to much running will have a reverse effect to muscle gain so Im at a point where I know I need to run but how much and when I am just not so sure.


#2

I’ve always been told as a pitcher you should run win sprints, not miles. Miles train your body for endurance, not speed and explosiveness, as a pitcher nothing you do in running miles will be correlated to your delivery, it’s the exact opposite… when you run miles you slow your body down so that you can make it the full distance, but when you run short wind sprints you push your body to the limit to be as quick and explosive as possible, which has a direct relationship to pitching.

Now this is coming from someone who doesn’t run as much as he should, but when i do run i run a series of wind sprints, starting at 60 feet and expanding to 125 feet, with short breaks in between.


#3

Well sprints have more of a direct impact on your explosiveness and speed however, distance running will help your endurance and could help your durability as a starting pitcher, help you to go more innings at a time.


#4

Forget about the slow twitch- fast twitch discussion for awhile and consider the time and energy you are devoting each week to a non-pitching specific activity. Depending on pace going 6 miles daily probably accounts for close to an hour or so if you are warming up and stretching properly afterward. If you run daily that’s 40+ miles and +/-7 hours a week.

Not only does it cost you time it costs you energy that could be applied to pitching specific workouts. Throw in the daily calorie burn from running (+/- 100/mile or so) and nutrition changes dramatically as well.

If you love running and want to work it into your program I wouldn’t be afraid of a long run once a week and shorter, more speed specific runs, perhaps intervals or a more sprint related workout, on one or two other days. Hopefully that would satisfy your fondness for running and still leave time and energy for additional focus on a pitching/baseball specific workout program.

By the way, Ubaldo Jiminez did six miles at 6:30 am the morning after his no hitter this week. It was likely his normal day after recovery activity but still a component of a major league program.


#5

I run because, I guess its only what I knew I could do endurance wise to boost endurance, It makes sense sprints for more explosiveness I can’t wait to move towards a more sprint oriented trainings. What can I do to keep my high endurance but do sprints more often will it matter, if so how often should I run and how long


#6

Here’s a sample MLB pitchers’ running plan, to give you an idea of the types of running they do. Notice, no one runs 5-6 miles, except maybe once a week … but it’s closer to 2-4 miles.

Mon: 7-sec sprints (rest 15 sec).

Tues: 15-sec sprints (rest 30 sec).

Wed: 30-sec sprints (rest 90 sec).

Thurs: PITCH GAME.

Fri: 20-30 min long run.

Sat: Agility drills …(jump rope, cone drills, etc.).

Sun: Off day.


#7

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]Here’s a sample MLB pitchers’ running plan, to give you an idea of the types of running they do. Notice, no one runs 5-6 miles, except maybe once a week … but it’s closer to 2-4 miles.

Mon: 7-sec sprints (rest 15 sec).

Tues: 15-sec sprints (rest 30 sec).

Wed: 30-sec sprints (rest 90 sec).

Thurs: PITCH GAME.

Fri: 20-30 min long run.

Sat: Agility drills …(jump rope, cone drills, etc.).

Sun: Off day.[/quote]

that’s a nice routine… simple yet effective… i might have to implement that into my workouts. How many sprints of each would you do, i assume more 7 second sprints than anything else, half as many 15 second sprints, and then again half as many 30 second sprints? I always sprinted predetermined distances and then increased the distances thus increasing the time of sprinting, never though about just sprinting for a certain amount of time though…


#8

Thanks for that info Steven. That looks like the perfect little schedule. I have just been alternating 1/8mile sprint and 1/8 mile runs 2-3 miles total every morning.


#9

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]Thurs: PITCH GAME.

Fri: 20-30 min long run.
[/quote]

House has the USC pitchers run 45 minutes the day after they pitch. (I imagine that’s for the starter and it might be broken up into segments but I don’t know for sure.)


#10

[quote=“Roger”][quote=“Steven Ellis”]Thurs: PITCH GAME.

Fri: 20-30 min long run.
[/quote]

House has the USC pitchers run 45 minutes the day after they pitch. (I imagine that’s for the starter and it might be broken up into segments but I don’t know for sure.)[/quote]

If you can do 45 mins, that’s great. If you’re running 7-8 min miles (remember this is a SLOW recovery run, not a long distance SPRINT), you’re looking at 6-7 miles. I still think that’s too much distance, but the point is that you do a longer recovery run the day after you pitch. I personally never went over 4 miles.


#11

Wish I could remember his name, but a very well thought of coach down south had an interesting running program for his pitchers: you would run sprints from the time you came out of the game until the final out.

I guess this helped encourage “quality starts” .

A funny sidenote … this was the same guy that when I was on a recruiting visit, gave this philosophy on chewing tobacco on his team:

“I have no problem with my guys chewing, but if you spit you’re gone” …


#12

[quote=“terprhp”]Wish I could remember his name, but a very well thought of coach down south had an interesting running program for his pitchers: you would run sprints from the time you came out of the game until the final out.

I guess this helped encourage “quality starts” .

A funny sidenote … this was the same guy that when I was on a recruiting visit, gave this philosophy on chewing tobacco on his team:

“I have no problem with my guys chewing, but if you spit you’re gone” …[/quote]

:lol:

I like both of the running and chewing rules.


#13

I followed a running program very similar to Steve’s in college. Sprinting as people have mentioned correlates far more to what we do in pitching, but you need to have at least one long distance run in between starts.

I always thought of the the long distance run as, “just being a human”. What I mean by that is we have to run for our heart, weight management, and just overall cardiovascular health. Otherwise, pitchers don’t get the full cardio workout they need from just playing.

Steve - I noticed you have a 7 day running routine listed as opposed to typical 5 day starter’s routine. What would a 5 day routine look like in the Cubs system?

Stu


#14

Day 1 - Pitch

Day 2 - Long run

Day 3 - Long sprint

Day 4 - Short Sprint

Day 5 - Pitch


#15

Thanks Steve!