How Much of a factor is size?

im a 15 year oldpitcher and ive been working hard in the past year or so on my pitching and ive finally got my fastball sitting around 80 mph. Im only around 5’6 or 5’7 and i weigh 135-140 pounds, and ive been reading that a lot of scouts wont be interested in a pitcher my size. Obviously i could have a growth spurt sometime soon, but im just wondering how big a factor is a pitchers size when he is being looked at by scouts or coaches?

size doesn’t matter
lincecum 5’11 170 98 - 100 mph
nolan ryan 6’0 100 mph+

Lincecum is more like 5’9. :smiley: That roster size is really pushed up. Roy Oswalt isn’t a very big guy either. Nolan Ryan’s more around 6’2 though.

If you can throw, you can throw. The reason scouts like taller pitchers is that they are, quote, “more durable.” I’m not sure how true that is, or what, if any, evidence supports that, but I’m sure they’ve got their reasons.

I’m sure you’ll grow eventually. You’re still young.

Good luck.

[/code]

Many moons ago there were a lot of small pitchers around the major leagues—and I mean small, like 5’6’’—Bobby Shantz, for example. And he could pitch! Billy Pierce was another one. So it really doesn’t matter how tall or how short one is; what matters is the ability to get the batters out. Unfortunately, most scouts nowadays will not even consider a pitcher who is under six feet—guys like Ed Lopat and Whitey Ford would never make it today because they were both 5’10", which is a crying shame, because both of them could really pitch and then some. :frowning:

Tim Lincecum
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/tom_verducci/07/01/lincecum0707/1.html
was 4’11"-85lbs as a freshman.

[quote=“xv84”]Tim Lincecum
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/tom_verducci/07/01/lincecum0707/1.html
was 4’11"-85lbs as a freshman.[/quote]

Wow. I did not realize that, and that is absolutely insane!

[quote=“xv84”]Tim Lincecum
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/tom_verducci/07/01/lincecum0707/1.html
was 4’11"-85lbs as a freshman.[/quote]
how did you find this out? and you do mean a freshman in highschool right?

did he pitch then
midget pitcher
lol

[quote=“the_K_king#2”][quote=“xv84”]
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/tom_verducci/07/01/lincecum0707/1.html][u]Tim Lincecum[/u
was 4’11"-85lbs as a freshman.[/quote]
how did you find this out? and you do mean a freshman in highschool right?[/quote]

Click on the link above. It’s in that article.

[quote=“kelvinp”]did he pitch then
midget pitcher
lol[/quote]

Lincicum didn’t make his high school team as a freshman because he couldn’t throw hard enough. This was told to me by his 18 yo coach who is coaching my son. He had that bad*ss curveball, and a nasty change, but his fastball didn’t come till later. As an 18yo he was throwing 91-92 and his hammer dropped off the table. Still only weighed a buck thirty-five as a Senior. :lol:

Hose

It would be ignorant to say size doesn’t matter (when speaking in regards to being scouting by pros) 6’0 and below is considered undersized. Projectability plays a huge role in getting drafted. Obviously there are exceptions to the rule, but go ahead and look at the mlb rosters and most those guys are 6’1 and up.

when it comes down to playing baseball size doesn’t matter
a scout shouldn’t worry about the height
if a person can play baseball good hisheight shouldn’t be a factor

[quote=“kelvinp”]when it comes down to playing baseball size doesn’t matter
a scout shouldn’t worry about the height
if a person CAN PLAY BASEBALL GOOD hisheight shouldn’t be a factor[/quote]

Explain next time. It does affect it, because the taller pitcher’s release point is closer to home plate, or towards first base like Randy Johnson’s.

A good example that height doesn’t matter is Jason Frasor, he throws around 98 and is 5’10

[quote]Explain next time. It does affect it, because the taller pitcher’s release point is closer to home plate, or towards first base like Randy Johnson’s.

A good example that height doesn’t matter is Jason Frasor, he throws around 98 and is 5’10[/quote]

what did you prove
too good baseball playes wth a foot difference in height
so should it matter how tall you are
if you can play baseball you can play baseball
you can be a midget it doesn’t matter
scou6ts shouldn’t pay attention to height
baseball skills is all that should matter

[quote=“kelvinp”]when it comes down to playing baseball size doesn’t matter
a scout shouldn’t worry about the height
if a person can play baseball good hisheight shouldn’t be a factor[/quote]
Shouldn’t, maybe. But it would be naive to think it doesn’t matter. It does. A guy has to have great stuff to be considered at all, but the old saying, “A good big man will beat a good small man” is the by-word in MLB. That said, there are many examples of guys who have made it despite their lack of height, but they make up for it in the size of their heart, desire, and determination.

Hose

Hi bucky102938,

The reason scouts tend to favor taller players over shorter ones is because smaller pitchers tend to put more wear and tear on their arms. Generally, a taller pitcher can throw a fastball with more ease because when he throws the ball his angle to home will be shorter. To compensate for this discrepancy, a smaller pitcher will have to throw harder exerting more pressure on his arm. Ultimately, this can lead to pitching injuries. Since scouts are looking for prospects that can last, they will often opt for taller players because of this. With this said, there are a number of pitchers that have been successful in college and the MLB who were under 6 feet. As the old saying goes, cream usually rises to the top.

Hope this helps,
Baseball Strategy
http://www.baseballtrainingtechniques.com/Baseball-Strategy/