How important is strengh training


#1

I just turned 16 and throw in the low to mid 70’s i’m 6’2 and 170 pounds but my only conditionong is playing hockey. how much velocity could i gain if i got on a good training program?


#2

Let’s put it this way. I was about your size and height. When I was 15 and 16, I was throwing 72-78 mph. At 18 (my senior year in high school, I’d touch 87-88 mph). Four years later in professional ball, at 22, I was consistently 94-95 mph.

Will a good pitcher-specific throwing and conditioning program help you gain velocity? You bet! It did for me.


#3

Its important enough for every professional and major college program have full-time strength coaches for their players. If you aren’t doing it, your opponent will. He will be faster and more powerful than you so if you are even talent wise, he will beat you because he is faster and more powerful.

Ultimately its up to you but I would definitely suggest you start working out.


#4

do you know of any good programs? i have been using the light dumbell exersises shown on this website but up here in canada we dont have high school baseball and are almost self coached (or at least i have been).


#5

I design strength programs for baseball players through my business No Excuses Baseball. If you are interested in one, email me and we can talk about it.

Whatever program you end up using, I suggest you find a good one and stick to it.


#6

make sure you do the propper kind of weight training. Dont lift too much weight, smaller amounts of weight, more reps. Dont do any over the head lifts. When you lift focus on complete range of motion, and stretch befor and after you lift. if not, you will gain negative effects.


#7

alright, thanks I’ll start checking out the weight rooms.


#8

The light weight, high rep methodology is a myth that needs to be broken. Baseball is a power sport and should be trained so. Stretching before you lift isn’t nearly as important as warming up. It can actually decrease your power output.


#9

Thank GOD for people like you Mike!!! SPREAD the word my friend!!!

My own son is a freshman in high school this year. I am a strength and conditioning coach myself but I turned him over to a friend because…hes my son. After 5 months of training his strength/power has increased by “leaps and bounds”. Hes benching 215 3 times which may not be tons of weight but they work on benching very little compared to the other stuff they do. He uses benchpress testing ONLY for purposes of measuring upper body core strength, its certainly not the mainstay of the training. He’s leg pressing 860lbs with ease, they work the legs specifically one day a week. Both of his leaps vertical and horizontal have increased immensly, hes more agile as well as a faster runner than he was. Hes also throwing the baseball 7 mph harder without upsetting his “cruising” intensity. Overall hes a much better athlete than before which should serve him well when competeing. I cannot believe most people still have the ole “wivestail” mentality about youth training. Especially with the information that is out there today. At any rate please give some tidbits along the way and please help to enlighten alot of people who heads are quite frankly buried in the sand on this issue. thanks!


#10

the last 2 posts are right on the money. just look at what college programs and pro clubs do in their strength programs.