How hard to lose muscle mass


#1

Since i started working out around the end of summer to about the end of november, I was able to make a gain of about 20 pounds from 170 to 190, but had to discontinue for the time being due to a mixture of finals and other personal issues. Its been about a month since then and when i weighed myself for the first time since my last workout, i noticed that i’m still at 190. I’ve heard that u normally lose muscle mass after about a week or two of no workouts, so i was expecting my weight to have nosedived a bit. Is this a sign of something wrong or is this a good thing?


#2

My guess is that unless you became a confirmed couch potato, you’ve been moving around a lot more than you think—enough to maintain your weight at 190. And it would take a lot more than just a week, let alone a month, of absolute inactivity to cause you to lose any muscle mass. So don’t worry about it; just take it easy at first when you resume your workout regimen so you don’t risk any injury. In fact, you will probably regain your former strength and flexibility faster than you had before. It’s a known fact that once you get going you’[ll pick up where you left off a lot faster. :slight_smile:


#3

How has your diet been. You would be surprised how much a good, high calorie diet can keep you from losing mass.


#4

It’s pretty unlikely that you have lost significant muscle mass. You probably have, however, lost a slight amount of strength.


#5

if you’re constantly in a catabolic state from insufficient calories you can start to lose muscle mass fairly quickly. I’ve lost 2-3lbs of muscle in a month in the past from getting injured and during my time off from training simply omitting a meal or two a day (maybe forgot to get those handful of nuts in the morning and protein shake before bed…1,000 calories gone).

I have found, however, that I can get these losses back relatively quickly (about 1lb or more of muscle/week) especially when I re-dedicate myself to gaining back all that I had lost.

It’s a bit more difficult for me, I think, because as a “hardgainer” I need to consistently overeat to make any respectable gains and when I stop overeating my body’s metabolism is still through the roof and it begins to “eat” itself faster than it might for other people. I’ve been known to be hungry 2 hours after finishing a chipotle burrito.


#6

so your diet plays a big part in the speed of muscle loss?


#7

Yes, an extremely large part. It also pays the biggest role (other than lifting) in gaining muscle mass.


#8

[quote=“LankyLefty”]if you’re constantly in a catabolic state from insufficient calories you can start to lose muscle mass fairly quickly. I’ve lost 2-3lbs of muscle in a month in the past from getting injured and during my time off from training simply omitting a meal or two a day (maybe forgot to get those handful of nuts in the morning and protein shake before bed…1,000 calories gone).

I have found, however, that I can get these losses back relatively quickly (about 1lb or more of muscle/week) especially when I re-dedicate myself to gaining back all that I had lost.

It’s a bit more difficult for me, I think, because as a “hardgainer” I need to consistently overeat to make any respectable gains and when I stop overeating my body’s metabolism is still through the roof and it begins to “eat” itself faster than it might for other people. I’ve been known to be hungry 2 hours after finishing a chipotle burrito.[/quote]

Dude I know how you feel about being hungry all the time, I lost a lot of weight (30 lbs) which was good but in doing so I’ve got my metabolism running through the roof and I have to eat almost every 2 hours.

With most people if you keep your calorie intake where it needs to be you wont lose any mass but you lose some strength but that will come back when you start working out again.