how fast?

i was watching the little league world series and was wondering wat would a 78 mph fastball from 46ft be if it was thrown on a 60.6 ft mound? how fast would it be?

very slow
but there kids

hawaii dudes splitter was going mid 70’s from that range

i thought so. my dad was argueing with me about it. ha im right

if major leaguers threw from there they would be hitting 100+(except for jamie moyer and the duke)
they show the major league speed from that distance
so its like they are throwing just as hard

This should be on an IQ test. A 78 mph fastball from 46.5 feet would be a 78 mph fastball from 60.5 feet. The speed doesn’t change, guys.

If you’re wondering what a pitch that has the same reaction time from 60.5 as it gives a hitter from 46.5, you’re looking at 102 mph or so.

Sheesh. How many times do I have to post this stuff.

Hose

comeon now
really

wouldnt the pitch slow down being thrown from a further distance?
hmmmmmmmmmmmmm
i think so

the pitch is being clocked at a shorter distance

I don’t know the physics of the last 15 feet of a pitch from 60.5 feet, but whether it is still accelerating, plateauing or decelerating would sort of give you the answer.

78 MPH from 60.5 would probably not be accelerating all the way through, so if a Little Leaguer threw from a real mound, I would guess it would have a negative effect on speed.

Just speculating though.

i always thought if you were to throw a baseball from 46ft and then threw it from 60.6ft it would be slower.

comeon now
really

wouldnt the pitch slow down being thrown from a further distance?
hmmmmmmmmmmmmm
i think so

the pitch is being clocked at a shorter distance[/quote]

Here’s the problem with that thinking. The pitch speed is calculated as it leaves the hand, not from the mid point or end point (or some other random point) in its travel. Nor is it deduced by the total travel time from hand to catcher’s mitt.

Any pitch will slow with distance as the lack of continued force being imparted, wind resistance, and gravity take its toll. The ball thrown from 46 feet will slow less than the pitch from 60, maybe a mile or two per hour. Reaction time from 46 feet is therefore, obviously, shorter than from 60. However, that wasn’t the question.

Hose

[quote]Here’s the problem with that thinking. The pitch speed is calculated as it leaves the hand, not from the mid point or end point (or some other random point) in its travel. Nor is it deduced by the total travel time from hand to catcher’s mitt.
[/quote]

i didnt get the point you were making

all speeds are clocked coming out of the hand?
in that case radar guns are inaccurate
i thought it was clocked during midflight
or as it approaches the plate

Kelvin as long as it is consistant it doesn’t matter. Radar guns are not innacture. But they don’t show the speed the ball is when it is at the batter. Not much of a problem though common sense shows that if your a hitter and say that seems like an 85 MPH fastball no they are not figureing how fast they think it is, they are comparing it to the speed they have seen and know a radar gun says mid 80s for a certain guy.

so the little leaguers arent throwing that hard

[quote=“kelvinp”]
i didnt get the point you were making

all speeds are clocked coming out of the hand?
in that case radar guns are inaccurate
i thought it was clocked during midflight
or as it approaches the plate[/quote]

There has to be a reliable point of reference so that you can compare across different pitches, pitch trajectory, and conditions. If you have ever used a radar gun, you know how difficult it is to get a good reading UNLESS you take it right out of the hand. Anything else is problematic. By “out of the hand” I mean in the first foot or less of the release point. After that, the pitch loses velocity as a function of initial velocity, air resistance, spin (which also affects air resistance), and gravity (which is a constant - as long as you are not going from the north pole to the equator to time pitches). Also, radar guns can be affected by other moving objects (birds, planes, superman!) if they are near the release point, and of course by the aim - poor or excellent - of the gunner.

Hose

Hoseman, just humor the kids would ya? 8)

Radar guns are indeed inaccurate, but as you say they are more effective as a way of rating the comparative velocity of pitches.

Kelvin, I would say that some of those kids are throwing the HELL out of it. A 78 mph pitch from 46’6"creates a reaction time of .4 seconds, which equates to 102 mph at 60’6". I am more amazed at the hitters that can actually get around on that fastball than I am by the freaks of nature (who I am sure are wonderful kids) who can throw it that fast at 12 or 13 years old.

Hose

[quote]Kelvin, I would say that some of those kids are throwing the HELL out of it. A 78 mph pitch from 46’6"creates a reaction time of .4 seconds, which equates to 102 mph at 60’6". I am more amazed at the hitters that can actually get around on that fastball than I am by the freaks of nature (who I am sure are wonderful kids) who can throw it that fast at 12 or 13 years old.
[/quote]

they wouldnt be throwing 78mph from 60.6 feet
and its mid to low ninetys from major league
saw it during the game today

Yes they would be throwing 78 because speed is speed. It measuers it out of the hand so distance has nothing to do with it. The target could be like 20 ft. away and 78 is still 78.

Nice little calculator here.

http://www.csgnetwork.com/baseballpitchspdcalc.html

[quote=“kelvinp”][quote]Kelvin, I would say that some of those kids are throwing the HELL out of it. A 78 mph pitch from 46’6"creates a reaction time of .4 seconds, which equates to 102 mph at 60’6". I am more amazed at the hitters that can actually get around on that fastball than I am by the freaks of nature (who I am sure are wonderful kids) who can throw it that fast at 12 or 13 years old.
[/quote]

they wouldnt be throwing 78mph from 60.6 feet
and its mid to low ninetys from major league
saw it during the game today[/quote]

sigh

Hose

Yes, speed is speed when measured from right after release. That conclusion has been made. The other, and more important conclusion, is that in regards to the amount of time as a batter you have to react to that pitch greatly decreases as the mound gets closer.

Anyone can hit a 78mph fastball out if they have 60 feet to look at it. From 45 feet the reaction time needed to get around is comparable to a 100+mph fastball from 60.

Case closed?