How are my mechanics? Almost 10


#1

Looking for feedback


#2

Its difficult to see anything from this distance/angle.

Have some video close up from 3rd base side, directly behind and directly infront (home plate) and you might get some comments.


#3

Here’s some HD video (1080P) from 3rd based side and a couple of pitches viewed from home palte.

slo motion

regular speed


#4

Good post position, good stride length and good glove side mechanics, I could however see him starting to use his back to pull the ball down more. You might be able do this without much work by getting him to bring his right hand down to the left knee while keeping his other mechanics unchanged. I think he looks very solid for a 10 year old otherwise. Good Luck and keep posting more.


#5

i would like to see him start his hips towards the plate before anything else. basically like falling hip/butt first towards the batter.

have him do something like the “hershiser drill” to get the idea.


#6

delete


#7

He normally does bend over more and put downward leverage on the ball in the game. What you saw is part of the inconsitency that he needs to works on. What about the fact that he is lifting his pivot foot early. Seems like this could could cause variation in pitch location(unless he perfects it.)


#8

I don’t think he lifts his post foot early off the rubber at all, I think as he works on pulling his right wrist to just above the left knee then the post foot will more naturally leave the rubber and eventually start to get the a more classic windmill action from the leg, right now it looks as though it collapses a little as it drags forward. This will get him to use his back more and end up with a flat back and a more athletic position at the end of throwing the ball.


#9

We will work on developing consistency of bending over at the waist. Right hand to left knee sounds like a good way to teach it.

We’re working on his change-up to go along with his fast ball. But with his hand size there’s not enough difference in friction at release between the two to obtain the speed difference needed to make the change-up effective without slowing down his arm speed. I’ve heard things like hold the fast ball loose and squeeze the change up harder. Any tips?


#10

[quote=“singtall”]i would like to see him start his hips towards the plate before anything else. basically like falling hip/butt first towards the batter.

have him do something like the “hershiser drill” to get the idea.[/quote]

Singtall - Thanks. We will work on that. When should the left hip start moving…at the apex of knee lift in the post position?


#11

He seams a little upright in his follow through. I would encourage him to push his chest to his glove rather than pull and tuck his glove.
This will get a little more bend in his back and follow through.
Good looking pitcher!


#12

i like to see the hips start moving as soon as his leg starts lifting. it takes some time to get used to that though. the hips should lead/start his body towards the plate.


#13

here is a good example of hips moving towards the plate:


#14

Singtall

If he starts moving toward home as his legs starts lifting then he wont achieve balance point in the post position. Balance point is what his pithing coach is emphasizing right now. i don’t see how a pitcher can do both simultaneously? Can you clarify?


#15

the idea is to get moving forward as quickly as possible to incorporate the whole body into the throw and not just the arm.

he will still be in balance because his head will not move much when his hips start moving forward. with his head still over his feet, he will still be at a balance point; but now his hips will lead and his body will get involved with the throw. he will have more velocity and less arm pain once he gets this down.

i started teaching my son this when he was 9 and he is a monster pitcher now that he’s almost 12.


#16

this is just my opinion but…

i don’t think you should teach balancing in a fixed position. for example: your son can field a ball then run and throw it pretty far i bet. there is no stopping at the top and getting balance during that throw, so why teach something that breaks your natural power source?

the idea is to move forward quickly and let your arm relax before the release; just like when you run and throw the ball.

your brain is great at figuring out how to balance and do things at high speed. let your son make a few throws by letting his hips lead and see what happens. all pros throw this way…it can’t hurt to try it.


#17

Change up speed can be reduced multiple ways, first by holding the ball deeper in the hand. Second and probably most effective is to hold the ball loser, the grip for the fastball and change should be substantially different in pressure.


#18

looks like a pro


#19

Looks good for a 10yo.

How he finishes int terms of posture will be determined by his arm slot and his momentum. Right now, he doesn’t create much momentum (i.e. he doesn’t get his body moving much). Moving forward sooner and faster is a good goal but takes more strength to manage and stabilize posture. This will come as he grows and builds more strength and once he gets away from the balance point drill which teaches pitchers to be late to the plate and leads to a more upright, less athletic starting posture. The balance needed by a pitcher is not in a stationary position but while moving over the course of the stride.

His feet are too wide in his stretch position because it causes him to weight shift towards 2B just to go into knee lift. Keep the feet about armpit width apart and staggered with back toe aligned with front arch. This will reduce unnecessary movement right at the start of the delivery.


#20

[quote=“Roger”]Looks good for a 10yo.

How he finishes int terms of posture will be determined by his arm slot and his momentum. Right now, he doesn’t create much momentum (i.e. he doesn’t get his body moving much). Moving forward sooner and faster is a good goal but takes more strength to manage and stabilize posture. This will come as he grows and builds more strength and once he gets away from the balance point drill which teaches pitchers to be late to the plate and leads to a more upright, less athletic starting posture. The balance needed by a pitcher is not in a stationary position but while moving over the course of the stride.

His feet are too wide in his stretch position because it causes him to weight shift towards 2B just to go into knee lift. Keep the feet about armpit width apart and staggered with back toe aligned with front arch. This will reduce unnecessary movement right at the start of the delivery.[/quote]

I get it about the momentum toward home. He’s actually able to avg ~57-59 MPH in a game for 2 innings, so when he can ge the momentum going that will be awesome. (I used a radar gun at home, but I also calculate his game speed on HD video: distance (ball release to front of home plate 46-4=42 feet) divided by time (time from ball release to front of home plate 15/30 sec). Then convert feet/sec to mph.

What do you mean by “late to the plate”?