Hip Shoulder Seperation / Scap Loading (Picture of myself)

Looks like good hip and shoulder separation - hips have opened while shoulders appear completely closed.

Judging from where 2B is, it does look like you stride to the closed side and that could block off hip rotation. I suppose it’s possible you could pick up a couple mph by fixing this. No guarantees, though.

It does look like you land somewhat closed. I’d definitely open up a little for the reason Roger mentions above. What kinda velocity are you getting now? If it’s not where you want to be post some other pictures at different points of your delivery or a video if possible. Your scalp load and hip/shoulder separation look really good though.

I don’t know your height and weight but those are legit DI numbers. Based on the one photo and the numbers you’ve given I would venture a guess that you’re doing a lot of things right. If you get in a good college program, stay healthy and follow their conditioning program your numbers are likely to get where you want them. In the meantime, I’d try working on landing a little more open and see if that frees up your hips. It could help. I wouldn’t try to fix anything else that ain’t broke though. If you’re looking for a tip to get ya to 93+ and increase the odds of having your name called in June I don’t think there is one, especially based on just that one photo. BTW, what state are you in?

RHP, what side of the rubber do you pitch from? If you pitch from the left side, that might take care of the closed side stride direction thing without having to change your stride direction. In other words, it’s a simple adjustment that really doesn’t require you to do anything different.

I’m currently studying the topic of separation on the D1 baseball level. It seems that you are providing a very adequate amount of separation in the picture. The question now becomes what is your body able to do with the potential energy that it has stored? What kind of core strength do you have to rotate and keep stress off the arm. There is an interesting study out there published by Dr. Aguinaldo at the San Diego childrens hospital that didn’t measure separation, but measured the timing of trunk rotation as the pitch was performed. He found that from little league age up through mlb pitchers that the amount of time from foot plant until the onset of torso rotation is greater in higher level pitchers and that their shoulder forces are not as high. What you should focus on at this point is strenthening your core and using your body accelerate the arm so that you can possible hit 95 mph, and more importantly stay healthy. Let me know if you have any questions.

Good comments, pinnbiomech. Are you an NPA guy?

FYI, Dr. Aguinaldo is on the NPA’s advisory board.

Roger,

I’m a graduate of the biomedical engineering program at the university of TN, Knoxville. I am currently interested in pitching performance and injury prevention research. Lately I’ve been reading a lot of publications and Dr. Aguinaldo’s is one that I really liked. I’m new to the field and am trying to begin a mobile motion analysis service for pitching, hitting, golf, etc. Right now it is more of a hobby and I’m spending most of my time collecting data from D1 college programs. My hopes are to offer this service widely for under $200 dollars so that more people can afford to take advantage of it. I guess we will see how it goes, but weather or not I am successful I still love talking mechanics and helping others.

Cool!

Tom House and the NPA have teamed up with The Andrews Institute (yes, that Andrews) to research injury prevention. I’m looking forward to getting some good info from that collaboration.

If you can pull off such an inexpensive motion analysis service, that would be great. While I haven’t had the privilege of looking at much high-speed video, I’ve talked with the NPA’s motion analysis guy and I know there is a lot to be seen that most people are unaware of. But I also know how expensive a really good motion analysis system is and I think it would take you a lot of clients to break even at under $200 per.

Your intentions are good and I wish you luck.

hey man, just watched the video and it’s obvious you’ve got a great arm and ability. you are landing across your body by, what i’d say is, at least a half a foot if not more. if you could get to where you’re landing with your landing foot perpendicular to the middle of your back foot that would free up your hips just a little bit more and possibly get you those few mph’s you’re looking for.
As for Roger’s comment about what part of the rubber you throw from, i could be wrong, but i think he means the left field side of the rubber. i’ve found that when i throw from the left field side of the rubber that i don’t land across my body. it’s kind of a perspective thing. if you throw from the 1st base side of the rubber, in order to feel like you’re going straight at home plate you kinda subconsciously step across your body. i don’t know if that was what roger was talking about but that’s what i’ve found personally. hope this helps.

Was this study building on the information from the study done by Andrews and Fleisig back in 1999 in the Journal of Biomechanics (“Kinematic and kinetic comparison of baseball pitching among various levels of development”) or summarizing those findings? Do you have a link? I would be very interested in reading that study.

SIGNIFICANTLY greater amount of time between hip and torso rotation, as much as 7%. IMO, youth players (and even high school) body’s are incapable of making this complex movement. In general they lack the functional strength, flexibility and coordination. Its a teaching point but its a LONG slow process to achieve.

Personally in my experience moving over to the right side of the rubber encourages opening up the hips properly.

[quote=“Roger”]Cool!

Tom House and the NPA have teamed up with The Andrews Institute (yes, that Andrews) to research injury prevention. I’m looking forward to getting some good info from that collaboration.

If you can pull off such an inexpensive motion analysis service, that would be great. While I haven’t had the privilege of looking at much high-speed video, I’ve talked with the NPA’s motion analysis guy and I know there is a lot to be seen that most people are unaware of. But I also know how expensive a really good motion analysis system is and I think it would take you a lot of clients to break even at under $200 per.

Your intentions are good and I wish you luck.[/quote]

NPA and the Biomechanical Institute have been teamed up for long time. There is already alot of information out there.

As far as motion analysis goes, Right View Pro is the least cost prohibitive in my opinion and the user interface is simple to understand. A great tool for any organization, IMO.

how goods your offspeed? got readings of the mph on those pitches? what do you throw?