Hip-Shoulder-Separation Drills

Anyone know any good drills to help me work on firing my hips more? Right now, my hips and shoulders turn at about teh same time. I have a pretty strong core, as I get some good torque while hitting, but I cannot seem to grasp leading with my hips in a throwing motion. If anyone had some good drills to help me work on this, it would be greatly appreciated.

Hersheiser drill works on driving the hips and keeping them from opening too early by driving the hips sideways to the plate for a long distance. I think that the hips longer will help develop more shoulder separation.

Many times, maximum hip and shoulder separation is NOT achieved because the shoulders rotate early due to some other flaw - usually posture or glove issues. So, taking care of those things is a good start.

Could you elaborate more? I realize without any video of my pitching, its impossible to receive an exact analysis, but if you could just explain some common flaws that may help me, I would very much appreciate it.

A late posture change like pulling/tilting the head and spine to the glove side or getting the shoulders out front can pull the shoulders open early. So can messing up the glove by dropping it, pulling it or flying open with it. These things basically destroy the timing of your shoulder rotation. Take care of these things and you enable your shoulders to stay closed longer resulting in better hip and shoulder separation, a longer stride, and a release point that is further in front of you and closer to the batter.

if you can’t achieve separation in a slow, 40% warmup throw, why in the world would you attempt to do so in a full speed pitch or drill? I struggled with this concept for a while until I realized that watching pros warmup, they still achieve that separation. If I could go through the movement slowly, making sure I stay closed, then I can gradually speed the movement up. This tip will not alleviate all problems, but it is a good start to getting the feeling of what staying closed is like.

It’s as simple as stepping towards your target while forcing the shoulders to stay closed, getting that rotation at your thoracic and not lumbar spine. This video of johnson caused my realization. Theres nothign special about it, it just happens to be a good example of how you should be able to look in your warmups before you ever try to implement the changes at full intensity.

[quote=“LankyLefty”]if you can’t achieve separation in a slow, 40% warmup throw, why in the world would you attempt to do so in a full speed pitch or drill? I struggled with this concept for a while until I realized that watching pros warmup, they still achieve that separation. If I could go through the movement slowly, making sure I stay closed, then I can gradually speed the movement up. This tip will not alleviate all problems, but it is a good start to getting the feeling of what staying closed is like.

It’s as simple as stepping towards your target while forcing the shoulders to stay closed, getting that rotation at your thoracic and not lumbar spine. This video of johnson caused my realization. Theres nothign special about it, it just happens to be a good example of how you should be able to look in your warmups before you ever try to implement the changes at full intensity.
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Thats actually exactly what I’ve been doing for awhile, and it doesnt seem to be helping much. I feel like I get separation when I pitch, but according to my pitching coach, I don’t, so that’s why I was seeing if there were other drills that may help.

I am actually pretty sure Roger hit the nail on the head, as I have never developed the habit of tucking my glove. It remains somewhat extended throughout my moition and finishes at my side. I did some light work with it yesterday, and it seemed to certainly help when I tucked it.

I’m hoping the answer is truly that simple. Although it usually never is.

A problem in understanding arises when studying traditionally oriented pitchers in regards to lengthening (cross core), is when their glove side leg plants their arms (benchmark, Humeral rotational set) are late in arriving in outwards rotation! You can NOT start to accelerate the ball until your Humerus is outwardly rotated, this is a fact all (but changing) coaches fail with when they take a stab at explaining what they are seeing.

With the traditionally arriving approach, the Humerus is inwardly rotated and not ready to throw by benchmark and is some timeline late!. Meaning any contractions before this only contribute to more lengthening. Only the contraction after the humerus is full outwardly rotated count towards acceleration. Watch how separation is lengthened and shortened while the Humerus is also going thru Humeral/forearm transition. When it arrives (Humeral outwards full rotation) the separation you all see is long gone because it was used to transition the arm.

Always identify when actual forwards progress with the ball starts, then you will discover the muscles that actually drive the ball!

If your Humerus is outwardly rotated when you glove foot confirms grip, only then is the small length of separation performed (shortened) while accelerating the ball. There is more and more every year MLB, MiLB, College players and younger discovering this. It was fully explained a long time ago, then the internet hit giving us thousands of unqualified opinions.

Hip shoulder separation is a myth wrapped in an enigma covered with sugar.

Eliminate it when lengthening, stay in alignment

Warning! It has been discovered that “Over early counter rotation past the field driveline” is a gateway pathomechanic at the throwing shoulder!

This why you see Laxity (instability) then Labrum issues with traditional approach oriented pitchers and Drop step High parabolic arm long tossers!

Humeral Forearm transition arrival is best performed on time, in alignment with the field driveline by having your Humerus outwardly rotated at least 80%, your hips and shoulders in alignment but rotated ahead slightly. Watch the Velo go up and safer.