Hip Rotaion


#1

Ok when pitching you go side ways till you turn the foot over. When your foot plant what should i be trying to do.
Should I be trying to Rotate my back hip to the front as fast as i can while pulling my glove side arm down toward my knee?
Is that what good hip rotation is?

Sorry about the spelling error of Rotation


#2

I wouldn’t really put focus on trying to rotate your hips fast. Instead, I would focus on getting the hips going sooner/faster and staying closed. This should cause you to build more momentum to get transferred into rotational momentum when the stride foot plants, the stride leg braces, and the back hip rotates around the front hip. At the same time, the momentum will help you get out over the front leg and into a position that affords good hip rotation.

Pulling the glove arm down to the knee has nothing to do with hip rotation. Furthermore, pulling the glove at all is not recommended. Stick it out front and bring the chest to it.


#3

so when i take my rocker step get my hips going so i will be able to build up more momentum.

So thats it just get going sooner and stay closed and also stay back a little.


#4

I’m not sure what you mean by “stay back”. If you’re getting your hips going sooner and/or faster, you’re definitely NOT staying back. However, you want to lead with your front hip - your head and shoulders will stay slightly behind the front hip into release. I guess you could call that staying back. Just make sure you’re not leaning back too much.

Try getting the hips going a little sooner and faster. That will make you quicker to the plate and you might be able to eliminate the use of a slide step.


#5

will getting the hips going qiucker help protect the arm and also will it help with velocity?


#6

You bet - assuming good mechanics and timing.

Building up more momentum creates more energy that can be delivered to the ball which maximizes velocity. Proper mechanics and timing makes sure that energy gets to the ball. Using the body to create that energy means you’re not trying to just chuck the ball as hard as you can using only the arm. Proper mechanics and timing means you’re not opening up early and doing other things that can cause harm.


#7

so by creating more momuntum will that help get extended over the front leg and finish out in frontover the plant leg?


#8

Assuming proper mechanics, yes. Something like a posture or balance problem or even a timing problem like opening up too early could prevent you from getting out front.


#9

so when i get the hips going quicker should I speed up the rythem of my body so it is smooth?


#10

I wouldn’t recommend purposely speeding up your body just to compensate with your hips going quicker. Basically you throw normally, while keeping your hips closed. I’ve been fooling around with this a few weeks ago, that is the hip rotation thing. What I found out is that you throw the same way, but work on closing the hips until … I believe when you arm creates an L. Don’t worry about that part though. Worry about keeping your hips closed. You’ll feel when you need to open them up, trust me.

What I’m noticing is that the ball seems to explode out of my hands. I can hear the sizzle on all of my pitches more. I’m not sure if that’s because I’m throwing hard or that I just have excellent rotation lol. But I do feel like I’m throwing harder,without throwing harder.

I hope that helped you out a bit.


#11

explain what feeling feels like when you have your hip closed? how will I know?


#12

For me learning to close my hips takes some getting use to. That said, it does improve my velocity, and rotation of the ball. When I try closing my hips, it seems a little unatural. So you have to fight the urge to open them back up. I suggest you try this right now. Stand about 5 or so feet away from a wall. Pretend the wall is the front part of the plate and that you are in your windup position. This means that your shoulders are parallel to the wall. Go through your pitching motion, and practice throwing slowly about 5 times. Now after that, go through the motion again, but this time try your hardest to keep your hips closed. That is try to keep them perpendicular to the plate (or the wall) as possible throughout your pitching motion. Right before your foot plants you should feel your hips wanting to explode open. This is also where your arm should be 90 degress (if you throw overhand). Now after you’ve done that, go back to your old way of throwing for 5 more times and compare the differenece.


#13

so it feels like a strech in the hip? Thats what you are talking about the strech feeling?


#14

Don’t over-do it and hurt something. For most pitchers, the hips will start to open when the stride foot opens to point at the target right before planting. How much the hips open at this point is dictated by the pitcher’s flexibility. Ideally, however, the rest of the hip rotation should be delayed until the front leg braces and stops the forward motion of the front hip. This, in turn, will cause the back hip to rotate around the front hip as fast as possible. Opening the hips before the front leg braces will waste energy created by the momentum down the hill.


#15

so stay sideways as long as you can then throw the baseball. Thats it just try to stay closed?


#16

In a way… yeah. It feels like your hips is leading you to the plate. Then suddenly before your torso and arm gets ready to let go, your hips opens up (goes parallel to the wall). I wish I could show you a video of me doing it, but I don’t have a digital camera.

Basically this is how it happens. You get to the primary position. That is, you’re standing on one leg. Your hands are together, the leading leg is up and you’re looking at the plate. Your hips are also perpendicular to the plate(wall).

Then you go into secondary position. Hips and torso stay perpendicular to the plate. Arms are seperated. Now a lot happens at this position. There are two funcitons of the secondary position. The first function is when you keep you weight back (as in above the rubber) but start to move the plate. When you shift your weight from your back foot to your front foot (which is the second function), your throwing arm begins to move up. At this point, your hips would want to open up (at least for me). Right before you plant your foot, just let your hips go, and fire the ball.

I’ve broken it down, mechanically, but it really shouldn’t take much though to perform. What I can do is sketch a diagram (since I can draw) and scan it in and post it on this thread toinight. Anyways, my thinking is at primary position, I’m relatively relaxed. During secondary position, I’m gathering up enough energy by keeping my weight back while moving my hips forward (but keeping them closed). When I feel like its the right time to unload the ball, my hips automatically get to that final position. The hips first fly open, and then your torso follows. Kinda like a rubber band when you twist the half while holding the top. The bottom starts moving and then the top follows suit. It’s kinda like that. I’m not doing much help, am I.


#17

I have Aim/ AOl IM me at jay21328 mabey then you can explain it better. I dont feel like my hips want to explode why is that?


#18

Lol, I have no idea. Yeah, I’m about to leave work soon, but I’ll chat with you around 7. That’s the time I get home.


#19

Will a long stride so like 90%-95% help? Does the downhill plae of the mound help the hips explode.


#20

Momentum coupled with a strong front leg that can brace and abruptly stop the forward motion of the front hip will lead to more explosive hip rotation.