Highschool stats

What kind of stats have to put up as a pitcher in junior and senior seasons to get noticed by colleges of d1, d2, and d3 caliber? And to be noticed by MLB scouts? A senior on my team last year had an era around 2.25 but is only playing d2 right now.

Stats can help, grades mean a whole bunch. The guy making a D-2 is not a shameful thing. Just for an example, my son was at the end of his senior season was the 5th rated pitcher in the state of Florida, his era was 0.89, he had D-1’s looking at him, but his grades and SAT weren’t enough so he went and played in one of the most competitive JUCO Leagues in America. Let me assure you that the level of the game was very high, so stats are good but not the final decider…you go shove upper 80’s with movement and you’ll get looks…you will get down and kiss mother earth if someone…anyone, offers you a scholly…D-Whatever.

The most important stats are your GPA / SAT scores and your fastball velocity. Almost nothing else counts.

Ain’t it the truth! :wink:

One of our kids is playing NWAACC Juco baseball up here, which scouts love because it’s all wood bat and the talent is no joke. He got a partial scholarship and a job on campus, and he figures to bat 2nd and patrol CF for them. It’s a hell of an opportunity, and he’s hoping to parlay it into a four-year scholarship. Personally, I think he’s more of a pro-style player, but I told him if someone comes to you with free money for college, you better take it. If you don’t make it in D-I ball, you wouldn’t have made it in pro ball.

He understands, fortunately! :slight_smile:

Based on the kids who got full rides from my town the last several years:

1- Be a pitcher
2- Be a left-handed pitcher
3- Be a left-handed pitcher who can throw 88+ mph

Also very true :slight_smile:

For all of you out there…this is very normal, you may want to actually study the NCAA or whichever league you intend to enter. In the Fla. JUCO league my son was able to be offered and accept a full scholarship, which included books and labs, this isn’t the case in other classifications.

I sincerely disagree here, well let me qualify, it is true that the majority of American players do attend college of some form, I don’t think D-1 is the only well-spring of American talent…and also what happens in many instances a kid will “go up” after completeing their degree at a JUCO and clearing scholastic disqualifiers. The perspective though is correct…It is more realistic to attend college and get the education which will allow you to be a successful adult…the guys making the bigs are a very small percentage of players…they also find that when they do make the majors…or pro’s at any level, they better have a solid understanding of business and how things get done…the days of the “dumb jock” are way over…you had better know how to negotiate, account for money, plan…the list is as endless as life…

[quote]
He understands, fortunately! [/quote]

And the good news is at that level…you don’t get a bunch of baloney…usually you get brutal truth…for good or bad, one of baseballs best lessons is facing reality…usually right out in front of a bunch of fans :shock:

[quote]1- Be a pitcher
2- Be a left-handed pitcher
3- Be a left-handed pitcher who can throw 88+ mph[/quote]

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Sure does seem that way…check out Hunter Scantling, he played travel with my son…guy can hit like you just have never seen before…you hear how when Mantle hit it, the ball made a “different” sound…well Hunter has that power…but look at his body type…and see what his body type says he’ll be in the bigs;

I really get angry when folks speak as though anything less than major DI college baseball is somehow something almost to be ashamed of. When you said but is only playing d2 right now, what you were doing was insulting that boy, his team, his school, and all other DII players, teams, and schools as well. i know you didn’t mean it that way, but that’s how it came across to me.

To begin with, a 2.25 ERA as a HS senior means absolutely nothing to me or anyone else, without being considered relative to other things. Was he a starter and got lots of starts, or was he long reliever, or closer? But even more than that, most people, especially college scouts and coaches, understand that a player’s HS numbers have to be taken with a big dose of skepticism.

Here’s an example. Here in Ca, of senior pitchers, an ERA of 1.94 ranked 500th. That means at least 499 other senior pitchers had an ERA the same or lower. So where do you think that boy from your school would have ranked? There’s a lot of DI schools out there, but if ERA were the sole determiner of who got to play, how many of those spots would be taken up by returning pitchers, and by one of those 499 others from just here in Ca?

But the thing is, there are about a million other factors entering into the equation, other than a pitcher’s ERA. All the baseball numbers tell someone, is that a given player has the capacity to play the game at that level, not whether or not he’ll be handle all the other things that go along with it.

Scouts and coaches generally dont carry around your grades, sat scores, or HS stats. They carry around a radar gun. Its pretty easy to figure out (right or wrong) what they place the highest value on. I know of a few kids who didnt start pitching until their senior year. Big kids, didnt put up great stats, were wild, but could hit the high 80s. They went to a few showcases and then got d2 scholarships. Better in the long run because they were better educational institutions and their parent saved a fortune on tuition.

And universally the very 1st question out of their mouth the second they think you may qualify off of that gun??? Wanna guess? :wink: My son was never…asked for his stats, his coach wasn’t, his TT coach wasn’t…nobody ever asked me…heck I’da puked em up like we used to have to recite the 10 responsibilities of being a sentry in my fine naval boot camp 8)

[quote]I sincerely disagree here, well let me qualify, it is true that the majority of American players do attend college of some form, I don’t think D-1 is the only well-spring of American talent…and also what happens in many instances a kid will “go up” after completeing their degree at a JUCO and clearing scholastic disqualifiers. The perspective though is correct…It is more realistic to attend college and get the education which will allow you to be a successful adult…the guys making the bigs are a very small percentage of players…they also find that when they do make the majors…or pro’s at any level, they better have a solid understanding of business and how things get done…the days of the “dumb jock” are way over…you had better know how to negotiate, account for money, plan…the list is as endless as life…
[/quote]

Oh I agree that HS talent can make it without going to college. I just meant for him, if he washes out of D-I ball, he would have washed out of pro ball too. Pro ball is quite a bit harder :wink:

Yes, velocity helps you get noticed. Does velocity help you get accepted into a school? No. My senior year of HS I went 10-1 with a 0.89 ERA and a fastball in the 88-90 mph range. Where did I go? D2 because I didn’t have the grades to get into the D1 schools that offered me scholarships. If you don’t have the grades, you don’t need to worry about the ball field.

Well, I wasn’t insulting him, the team, or players, I just felt that he was a good enough pitcher to maybe be a little higher, but I don’t know what field he’s pursuing so maybe that d2 is where he wants to be. All I wanted to know was what kind of stats and make up generally help get someone into a really good school.

I don’t think you’re getting the idea that there’s a lot more to it than how skillful a player is. I also don’t think you understand what constitutes “good” HS stats.

We had a boy last year who’s ERA was 3.56, and that was against some of the weakest competition we faced as a large school. He got drafted in the 3rd round, but, he only got $250,000, because he had no leverage. Not one college offered him a scholarship because his grades and SATs were so bad. Meanwhile, another local kid had a better ERA, but it was a much smaller school, playing against even weaker competition. He got $750,000+, even though he didn’t go until much later in the draft, because his grades and SATs were outstanding, and he had more scholarship offers than he could shake a stick at.

I think you’re confusing stories about what used to go on, more than 5 years ago. That was before the ball players had to make grades in the fall semester, only 35 players were allowed on rosters, there were only 11.7 ‘ships per program, and players had to sit a year when transferring.

It used to be a kid who had lousy grades but could really play, could be “carried” and “helped” along to stay eligible. But coaches have become much more cautious. If a kid has to be “helped” not just in the spring, but in the fall too, and then might not be eligible, chances are that coach isn’t gonna waste even a portion of a ‘ship on him. That why more and more ‘ships are going to “local” players, rather than to kids half a continent away.

Remember too, with only 11.7 ‘ships total, that only works out to 1/3rd of a ride for every player on the roster. I don’t know how much you know about the costs of going to college, but I’ll tell ya, a third still leaves a loooooong way to go at most schools. That means mom and dad better have some $$$$, someone’s willing to go into serious debt, someone’s willing to bust butt working a job while going to school, or maybe a cheaper alternative is the best option.

What you should do, is contact that pitcher you thought should have been able to play at a more prestigious school, and ask him to explain why he made the decision he did.

[/quote] All I wanted to know was what kind of stats and make up generally help get someone into a really good school.[/quote]

there are some really “good schools” at the d2 level…

Right on!

There are also some really good schools in every NCAA division, the NAIA, and JUCOs as well.

What kind of GPA’s are we looking at here? Weighted or unweighted? My weighted GPA so far (half way through junior year) is a 3.5-3.7, and my unweights is less than a 3.5 for sure but over a 3.0. Its that any good at all?

3.5-7 is outstanding. Have you been practising your SAT/ACT? If not do so. Grade qualification is HUGE!!! If you take a practise SAT and don’t do well…get a tudor or study guide, take more practise.

Go to CollegeBoard (a great site). Sign up for the SAT question of the day. Go to the library and get an SAT study guide. Keep your grades up. At the end of the day, tell yourself that you are going to be the best student you can. Then, use baseball to get into a school that you wouldn’t have been admitted to otherwise (that is, have the grades and the ability to have a coach pull you in). I brought my son to a college baseball game last year. The two teams playing each other were OUTSTANDING academic institutions. After the first inning, my son (then a Sophomore in high school) said “Dad, I could play here right now”. I said, “yes, son, you could but could you get in?”

I know this is very late :?, but what are the chances a pitcher who pitches with both hands gets in, in any college or competition?

It’s rare but there’s been a few, even a few years back the Yankees took a kid outta Creighton I think who pitched from both sides, not sure what he’s doing now though.