High school coachs wants...?

Hey there, just wondering what high school coaches look for at tryouts. Could you please tell me so i know what to work on for tryouts…

I’m sure coach Kreber can give a better answer, but here’s what I got for attending having tryed out:

Probably run a 60
Throw less than a bullpen
I wouldn’t expect a radar gun because kids usually overthrow
If you play a position, you’ll hit a few rounds
A lot of schools intersquad also

Hope this helps, for a best answer, you could go to your High School coach and I’d bet you could get a pretty good idea of what to expect.

[quote]Probably run a 60

what? lol[/quote]

By running a 60, he meant 60 yard dash.

Also, depending on the position your striving to play, they’ll probably have you do some drills, whether it’s some infielding practice, outfielding practice, or just doing baserunning to see how fast you are. But one of things that I look for in a teamate is someone who has a passion for the sport. I love playing baseball with a group of guys that want to win, or atleast try to. Dedication is also another key factor; Coaches look for someone that strives for success. That even though you may not have something down the first time, if you’re willing to put forth the effort to improve yourself as a baseball player, not only on the field, but off, they’ll look at you as someone that could improve their team. Attitude may play a role picking a player, too, but then again, that could go along with what I mentioned above.

One of things that I do as player/pitcher is set up a winter workout routine. Strength training, sprints, etc… Right now, i’m in the phase of strength training, since my season is not going to start for awhile.

If your striving to be the best player you can be, empathize the mental aspect of the game, if your a pitcher, Consitently work on your mechanics, get them down before you start strength training, and look for workouts and drills that can better prepare you for the season. But, instead of just focusing on one aspect of the mechanics, focus on the whole body. And beware of certain exercises that could potentially damage your elbow and decrease your range of motion. Also, find things that motivate you to want to work hard, don’t just do it becasue you have to, do it because you want to. One of things that motivate me is the fact that .05% of baseball players are signed out of highschool to an mlb team. I think that’s the percentage.

Basically, just talk to with your coach to see what he looks for in a player. Tell him who you are, what position or positions you play, and sort of your outlook on the game itself. Also, if you can, try and get in contact with any former players, maybe they could be of some help. And, furthermore, see if the coach runs any pre season practices, or workouts, and try and attend those consistenly. One more thing, have fun.

Coach Kreber can probably elaborate in more detail on this.

I went through some of your old posts and noticed that your only 15, so instead of doing some heavy weightlifting, focus on doing more sprint based drills, and core work. I’m not really sure what type of coach you have, but in the research i’ve done, most college coaches would rather not see you throw submarine. You may not feel it now, but you’ll feel it down the road. Anyways, just stay positive, relax when tryouts come, and just do your thing. Don’t try and overdo anything, just play your game.

[size=18]What a HS Tryout may consist of:[/size]

1. Strength Testing:

Testing may include the three major lifts: bench, clean and jerk, and squat.

2. Speed Testing:

Testing may include the 60-yard dash, 40-yard dash, vertical leap, pro ability, home to 1st, and home to 2nd.

3. Velocity Testing:

Testing may include throwing a baseball from right field to 3rd base, from deep in the hole at shortstop to 1st base, from behind 1st to 3rd, and off the pitcher’s mound.

4. Defensive Skills:

Testing may include forehand, backhand, slow rollers, lateral movement on groundballs, fly balls, hitting the cutoff man, and catching the ball on the run, tags on runners, quickness on ball release, and glove transfer.

5. Offensive Skills

Testing may include hitting fastballs, breaking balls, and change ups. Hitting for average and power possibly will be monitored. Also, the ability to hit in certain situations such as a hit and run opportunity. Furthermore, bunting skills may be evaluated at the tryout by the coach.

6. Base running Skills:

Testing may include leads, jumps on pitchers, overall base running knowledge, and ability to take the extra base on an outfield single.

7. Possible Scrimmage Game:

If weather permits, the coach may set up a game-like situation incorporating a scrimmage into tryouts. Usually pitchers will throw two innings and be evaluated on command, mechanics, velocity, and ability to control the running game.

Five ways to showcase your ability:

1. Arm Strength:

Players who have the best arms stick out like a sore thumb no matter if you’re at a little league tryout or a MLB tryout. A coach who watches a player fire rockets usually finds his imagination running wild. Make sure you are trying to improve your arm strength everyday.

2. Mechanics:

Mechanics is a general term that can be applied to offense, defense, and pitching. Offensively, start swinging a bat 20 times per day. The more you swing, the better and more effortless your approach will look. Defensively, if you are an infielder, work on your glove work from the standing and kneeling positions. If you are an outfielder, take a lot of fly balls. Pitching wise try to throw off a mound as much as possible. During the winter, focus on the towel drills and try to get 100 repetitions completed a day. Work with weighted balls and other materials to improve arm action during the delivery.

3. Conditioning:

Go into tryouts in great shape. Being in great condition has nothing to do with athletic ability; it has to do with discipline. Start timing your running and make sure your lifting weights at least three times a week. Also, make sure you are doing at least 20 minutes of abdominal work a night. Conditioned athletes’ standout during tryouts because they do not get tired easily. Furthermore, these kinds of athletes carry an attitude of success.

4. Knowledge of Game:

A coach loves a player who comes in with a large knowledge base. Make sure you are familiar with your defensive responsibilities. Where do you line up with a man on 1st? What do you do on a double cut to left? Your coach will be impressed if he doesn’t have to educate you on every small detail of the game.

5. Character:

What kind of investment are you willing to make for your baseball team? Are you getting good grades? Is your behavior at school embarrassing to your coach? Are you going to give consistent effort every single day to get better? These are the questions your coach will be asking when he is deciding on a roster. Hopefully, he can answer “yes” to all of the questions above.

thanks alot coach, Im going to try my hardest. I actually met someone last night who pitches for southwerstern illinois’ college. He made the team for 2 years in a row, then didnt make the cut, then he quit and started to stupid stuff, then he worked as hard as he could, sprinting, lifting, throwing, and he got to the team. Great story he told me, but can’t explain the whole thing. Im gonna be doing sprinting today at my town baseball feild, and when I have enough baseballs, Im gonna go out into center feild, and throw them to homeplate, probably like 50-70 throws. And im gonna be lifting alot morw at my town gym, and alot more bikeriding.

Great post by coach Kreber. We leave out the weight lifting as its just not smart during baseball season. We do however run an off season program. I do believe that sox05 wanted to know what coaches look for. I have always looked for hustle and attitude first, then of course talent. Coachability is big. A kid must be able to complete all of the tasks he is asked to do and understand them as well. We do not teach at tryouts, that begins once we’ve selected the team. If you are prepared when you arrive, proper attire, ready to run and throw, and you are a decent player, you will get looks.

In response to Coach Ric, why wouldn’t weightlifting be smart during the season? In my experience, weightlifting during the season only further propells your game to the next level. As a pitcher, weight lifting allowed me to heal much faster then my teamates, and allowed me to maintain what ever strength I acquired in the off season. I’m not here to get in any arguments, but I would just like to know your reason on why you feel weight lifting is not a smart thing to do during the season?

we also lift inseason. our program is based on college and pro inseason lifting programs. i also want to ask why thats not smart since every college and pro program in the country lifts inseason.

If you don’t lift during the inseason you will be at your weakest point during the championship. Lifting does change during the inseason but it should continue throughout the season.

I guess the comments came from a tryout perspective. We at the schools I’ve worked at, do not try kids out with heavy wieght until we know more about them. Our off season program is bigger, faster, stronger. Then we have a light program for flexibility and athletiscism during the season. I may get disagreement with this but most big leaguers will bike train and work with machine weights at lighter weight during the season. Bulking up is fine in the offseason but unheard of during the season where I come from and where I’m going. A lot of players will not use heavy weight during the season for their own fears. I believe Mike commented that inseason programs do change and thats my belief. We just don’t have kids test their strength at tryouts.

Merry Christmas, Coachric

I see your point, but to maintain strength during the season, lifting should be moderate-heavy; the goal here is not to lose muscle, but to be able to maintain it. Some of the college players I’ve had a chance to talk with all lift moderate-heavy during inseason. Even when doing squats, I’ve heard plenty of players tell me the same thing; For example, the squat, they mention how they’ll warm up with 225, 25 reps, etc…

I’m sure Mike Griffin will be able to explain more then me, but, he, too, has mentioned that inseason weight lifting should be moderate-heavy.

If you go light during the season; it doesn’t benefit the team going into the offseason… Although, I completely understand why you would lift light during inseason if you have new players that are not used to working out.

Merry Christmas!!!

I’m still exploring the forums when there isn’t much new going on. I found this gem…thought it would be worth a second look–even for the ‘old pros’ :smiley:

[quote=“CoachKreber”][size=18]What a HS Tryout may consist of:[/size]

1. Strength Testing:

Testing may include the three major lifts: bench, clean and jerk, and squat.

2. Speed Testing:

Testing may include the 60-yard dash, 40-yard dash, vertical leap, pro ability, home to 1st, and home to 2nd.

3. Velocity Testing:

Testing may include throwing a baseball from right field to 3rd base, from deep in the hole at shortstop to 1st base, from behind 1st to 3rd, and off the pitcher’s mound.

4. Defensive Skills:

Testing may include forehand, backhand, slow rollers, lateral movement on groundballs, fly balls, hitting the cutoff man, and catching the ball on the run, tags on runners, quickness on ball release, and glove transfer.

5. Offensive Skills

Testing may include hitting fastballs, breaking balls, and change ups. Hitting for average and power possibly will be monitored. Also, the ability to hit in certain situations such as a hit and run opportunity. Furthermore, bunting skills may be evaluated at the tryout by the coach.

6. Base running Skills:

Testing may include leads, jumps on pitchers, overall base running knowledge, and ability to take the extra base on an outfield single.

7. Possible Scrimmage Game:

If weather permits, the coach may set up a game-like situation incorporating a scrimmage into tryouts. Usually pitchers will throw two innings and be evaluated on command, mechanics, velocity, and ability to control the running game.

Five ways to showcase your ability:

1. Arm Strength:

Players who have the best arms stick out like a sore thumb no matter if you’re at a little league tryout or a MLB tryout. A coach who watches a player fire rockets usually finds his imagination running wild. Make sure you are trying to improve your arm strength everyday.

2. Mechanics:

Mechanics is a general term that can be applied to offense, defense, and pitching. Offensively, start swinging a bat 20 times per day. The more you swing, the better and more effortless your approach will look. Defensively, if you are an infielder, work on your glove work from the standing and kneeling positions. If you are an outfielder, take a lot of fly balls. Pitching wise try to throw off a mound as much as possible. During the winter, focus on the towel drills and try to get 100 repetitions completed a day. Work with weighted balls and other materials to improve arm action during the delivery.

3. Conditioning:

Go into tryouts in great shape. Being in great condition has nothing to do with athletic ability; it has to do with discipline. Start timing your running and make sure your lifting weights at least three times a week. Also, make sure you are doing at least 20 minutes of abdominal work a night. Conditioned athletes’ standout during tryouts because they do not get tired easily. Furthermore, these kinds of athletes carry an attitude of success.

4. Knowledge of Game:

A coach loves a player who comes in with a large knowledge base. Make sure you are familiar with your defensive responsibilities. Where do you line up with a man on 1st? What do you do on a double cut to left? Your coach will be impressed if he doesn’t have to educate you on every small detail of the game.

5. Character:

What kind of investment are you willing to make for your baseball team? Are you getting good grades? Is your behavior at school embarrassing to your coach? Are you going to give consistent effort every single day to get better? These are the questions your coach will be asking when he is deciding on a roster. Hopefully, he can answer “yes” to all of the questions above. [/quote]

An old thread I know, but, I would add show up in shape (I know it mentions conditioning). I dont know how many time starting in little league I have seen tryouts where kids are winded and starting to get “heavy feet” after a short warm up and running a couple of poles. As a coach this would tell me (at the high school level anyway) this kid doesnt care enough to prepare at all. Also, dress like a baseball player. Have a clean uniform/pants or whatever. Hustle above all else. A bad day during tryouts can happen. A decent coach will be able to see good technique through a bad day. Almost all coaches will see unrelentling hustle.
I told my son, keep your mouth shut and your feet moving. No one cares if you hit 3 home runs in a JV game last year.