High School Baseball practices..?

I’m just curious to what Coach Kreber would consider a good practice. Any other coaches opinions are wanted as well.

good question, but vague. theres alot of areas you have to cover in practice. what specifics are you wanting to know?

what things can you do at practice, like drills or pitching or hitting

we have about 4 master practice plans and we fill in each with what we need to cover that day.
example:
agilities/stretch/throw - 20 minutes
individual defense - 15 minutes
fungo work - 4 way/2way to infielders
1 way/3 way to outfield - 20 minutes
team defense/pfp - 20 minutes
5 station hitting - 25 minutes
live hitting - 30 minutes
baserunning - 15 minutes
pitching work/weightroom
thats an example of an early season practice for us

Here is the following practice aspects covered everyday in our program. After practice, the pitchers will stay for an extra half hour to work on conditioning, mechanics, and strength. It is important these skills are addressed everyday so players can be prepared for different situations in the game.

[b]Practice

  1. Pre Practice Activities
  2. Stretch
  3. Running
  4. Baserunning
  5. Throwing Drills
  6. Individual Defense
  7. Team Defense
  8. Individual Offense
  9.         Team Offense
    
  10. State Tourney Conditioning Drill[/b]

If you want our season practice plan in a more in-depth format. Please personal message me your email and I can forward it to you.

thanx, i did pm so i could get more info on your practices

Just a short addition. Pay attention to the type of running. Just jogging, or running poles could be better used doing agility, sprint work, and things like gassers etc. I’m finding that many of my kids (13-16) aren’t that athletic and need a lot of work to improve their coordination and all around game.

Well my personal opinion and I don’t know if you are doing this at all is that the hitting and the fielding should be going on at the same time, have whoever is the hitting coach over with whoever is hitting and whoever is throwing BP and have him analyze the swing and everything in the cage, have a few guys doing soft toss and somebody on the tee, then a few people at a running and conditioning station type thing and a few people doing fielding drills and pitching drills, have these guys all rotate stations throughout the practice. Then take infield once or twice a week.

Just a way to get more done at once and make the most out of time instead of half of the team out rubbing their wanks talking about mexican girls instead of doing something to make themselves better. Just my opinion on it though.

Here’s a normal practice for me:

  1. Running/Stretching
  2. Play Catch
  3. Pitching Drills
  4. Pitchers Fielding Practice
  5. Station Batting (Live pitching when there’s no 3 and 4)
  6. Infield/Outfield defense
  7. Situations
  8. Situations w/ live base runners
  9. Pro Batting
  10. Conditioning

we start at 3:30 and usually go until 6:00

Id say a good practice is when everyone is working hard as they can, you get finished with each drill on time (this indicates that not much went wrong minimizing a coaches need to talk) and everyone had fun.

I believe one of the most productive practices in general a coach can run is a live situational practice where runners are used. Any game situation can be created and the coach can dictate what is going to happen by setting it all up the way he wants and by hitting the ball where he wants it to go.

Those suggestions that have been made here are very good.

[size=18]HOWEVER[/size]…

The very first thing that I would suggest is to sit down with every player, ask them for a nutrition itinerary, that they had that day.

what did you have for breakfast this morning?
what did you snack on b-4 lunch?
what did you have for lunch?
what did you eat prior to coming to this session?

Normally, during the preseason a player will end his last class, hit the lockers, change, then show up on the gym floor, or, onto the field somewhere.

Take special note of those that just seem to be running on a few cyclinders, sluggish, off the mark. If you have any experience in this area, you eyes will pick out those that either don’t make a deliberate effort to prepare properly, or even worse, those that lie. It’s the group in the second case that deserve a = " how come?"

It’s not all that unusual for a youngster to feel like there’s no big deal missing a meal, grab a quick fix of a candy bar or something. They deserve better and you can set an example that very few high school programs provide - VERY FEW.

Carbs are needed prior to any workout, proper hydration also - prior to, during and after. Other nutritional needs can be addressed.

Want some suggestions - ask away.

Coach B.

Great comments/advice.

Personally in general terms if I had to pick one practice over others and obviously not looking at need based areas of attention or pitching specific portions of any practice my ideal choice for a practice would be "a coach controlled, live situational practice.

Meaning, nine players on the field, base runners, and a coach hitting live fungos creating game scenario situations. Such as but not limited do or die plays, must get out situations, inbetween flys/areas of jurisdiction…

Base running and the 3B coach handling runners and transversely runners learning to have faith in their 3B coach; all of these things and any thing else can be managed in these types of practices.

If I had to pick one template aside from area specific work that needed attention this would be it…players love it!

“Practices are coach days, games are player days.”

Coach Conley, you talk about “live situational practice” as one of the best high school practices that can be done—how true! And not just in high school, but at all levels of the game. I remember one day when Ed Lopat showed up at Yankee Stadium with a few guys—he said they were kids he had rounded up for this purpose, to be infielders, plus someone with a bat to hit fungoes and line drives and such. He had told me that he felt it would be a good idea for me to get in some practice at fielding my position, and so this was what we did. We all moved over to a playing field that wasn’t being used, and I had a most exhilarating workout.
When Lopat had worked with me one gloomy Sunday morning on holding runners on base, we practiced with phantom runners ranging from the “bump on a log”—a runner who wasn’t going anywhere—to the definite threat to steal. Now we were doing it with real live baserunners for me to hold and to practice pickoff moves on, in addition to other aspects of PFP—pitchers’ fielding practice. He had told me once that when a pitcher steps off the rubber s/he becomes a fifth infielder and has to be able to do all the things infielders do, and now we spent a good two hours on this. Later, when it was over and the others had dispersed, he surprised me. When I asked him, “Those guys you had out there today—they weren’t kids, were they?”, he said no—they were a few of the Yankees’ second-line players. He thought I would enjoy having a chance to get in some fielding practice with them. And he was right. I got more out of that one afternoon than a lot of folks get in a whole season.
Yes indeed, there’s nothing like the situational workout—recreating actual game conditions. I unhesitatingly recommend this. :slight_smile: 8)

small school decent program my first year as head coach. 27 varsity and jv players combined.myself and asst. 1 or 2 volunteers. First practice in a good size gym.1. dynamic warmup 2. baserunning(home to first time)lead at third and return.(lead and take off steal of second. 3.Ind. positional work 4.Throw and catch 5. Whole team work-positioning of fielders/young players weightroom 6. Hitting stations/pitching

My coaches usually have a hitting day or a defense day based on how we preformed at our last game, and once a week we have a conditioning dasy which is all work outs, here is a normal practice for us.

  1. Run/Stretch/Throw-30 mins
    2.Fungo drills-30 mins
    3.Outfield/Infield drills (seperatly) or Hitting drills-1 hour
    4.Live BP-1 hour

Note to CoachConley:
You are so right about live situational practice. this is particularly true of PFP—pitchers’ fielding practice, an aspect not enough attention is given. I remember one day when my pitching coach suggested that it might be a good idea for me to get in some of this, and about a week later he showed up with a few guys—he said they were kids he had rounded up to be infielders, plus another one to hit grounders and stuff. We went to a seldom-used playing field near Yankee Stadium, and we spent a whole afternoon on just that—PFP, and situations with live base-runners so I could work on holding runners, pickoff moves and the like. It was a strenuous workout and a lot of fun, and I got more out of that one afternoon than most pitchers get in a whole season—it was very intense, very concentrated, no time to think, just execute the various plays we worked on.
And when it was over and the other guys disappeared, my coach—an active member of the Yankees’ Big Three rotation—surprised me. Those weren’t kids, he said. They were a few of the Yankees’ second-line players, and he had felt that I would get a kick out of getting in some infield practice with them. He reminded me that when a pitcher steps off the rubber s/he becomes a fifth infielder and has to be able to do just about all the things infielders do—and I never forgot that. :slight_smile: 8)

This is a great thread, especially for us youth coaches that never play HS or college baseball.

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Coach Conley, you talk about “live situational practice” as one of the best high school practices that can be done—how true! And not just in high school, but at all levels of the game…
Yes indeed, there’s nothing like the situational workout—recreating actual game conditions. I unhesitatingly recommend this. :slight_smile: 8)[/quote]

As such, I’d recommend extra hitting against a live arm instead of off a tee or soft toss. Even if it’s Grandma tossing wiffle balls, it’s seeing and reacting to an arm motion. Just keep Granny behind a screen. Even wiffle balls sting. One never hits a stationary ball in a game and one never hits an underhand pitch thrown from beside the batter. The only thing soft toss does, when you think of it, is make you good at soft toss and get you loose. It does nothing for hitting.

Think of it this way…would a golfer benefit from having someone roll golf balls at them to be struck while still in motion? Would a basketball player benefit from trying to sink baskets through a moving hoop? These activities do not translate to game situations. Coaches spend way too much time on soft toss and batting tees.

[quote]The only thing soft toss does, when you think of it, is make you good at soft toss and get you loose. It does nothing for hitting.
[/quote]

Not exactly true. Soft toss along with tee work are very good tools to check and tweak the mechanics of hitting.

That being said, I agree, nothing beats live hitting for game prep. At my kids HS the varsity team begins playing simulated games and does inner squad games from the second week of practice.