High School Ball

i am a sophmore in high school and i pitch around 80 consistently so i was wondering how much more velocity i have to gain before i graduate and what is the average speed for a sophmore

According to Webball (Index of /) the player norms as reported by coaches indicate that a 15-17 yr old throws around 80mph and an 18 yr old throws around 87mph. Again, these are norms as submitted by others, so how official or scientific the numbers are is anybody’s guess.

  1. Accuracy
  2. Movement
  3. Velocity

It will help you to ‘ring the bell’ but you must be accurate and have at least some ability to put movement on the ball. Here is a link from a former scout on what they are looking for in pitchers (and every other position for that matter). Oddly, there hasn’t been much discussion on this forum about pitchers having the right ‘stuff’ or ability to handle pressure and pitch smart.

http://www.attheyard.com/AskTheExperts/article_8.shtml

You are right, Jon’s Dad. I keep breaking my cardinal rule about pitching…it’s location, location, location and change of speed. If you have a 70mph change up, your 80mph fastball looks a heck of a lot faster…and if you can put it where you want it, then it’s hard to hit.

i know control is very important but i think that velocity is down played. I see no draft picks that an 80mph fastball.It takes velocity too.

80 mph is very good for a sophmore. You are right where you need to be

Im a Juinor in Highschool. I throw around 75, but I also throw a splitter, change, and a decent curve. Im not an overpowering pitcher you see, but my ‘junk’ gets me the ground out, and the pop out. I read a post earlier about having to have velocity? My dad has taught me that it goes in this order, Location, movement, and then velocity. This is just my oppinion, and I’ll use a friend of mine from school for example. I would rather have control, than an overpowering fastball. My friend throws around 85, he is a juinor too. He strikes out a lot of people, but he also gives up the free base, which led to a 10-3 loss for us. I threw my junk, and got us out with a 5-1 win. When high heat hits a hot bat, it leaves the yard in a hurry. BTW, in 27 innings. I’ve had 21 k’s, and 4 walks.

i was just implying that velocity should not be over looked…You think Ryan,Clemens,Martinez,Schilling and the list goes on and on would be as effective throwing low to mid 80’s…grant it some velocity does come with time I am just saying it is something to work for.

The database I gathered suggests that depending on age, a HS sophmore heading towards being a top HS pitcher would cruise somewhere between 78 and 81 mph. Top speed would be about 4 mph faster. A typical HS sophmore would cruise between 74 and 77 with top speed once again being about 4 mph faster.

Typically the pitchers would gain another 5 to 8 mph between their sophmore and senior seasons. Everybody is different so these are very general and shouldn’t be taken to apply to any one person.

80 MPH is slightly above average for a sophomore in HS. It is definitely above the normal curve and I would be pretty happy to see you in my pitching staff. More important than the 80 MPH is how the force is generated. Being a sophomore, you have to be around 15-16 years old. You are either pretty strong or have good arm action. We have a sophomore who throws 80 MPH and weighs 129lbs. He has great arm action, but does not have the body to use in fully yet. Will he ever get it? That is the big question and one that may be facing you. If you throw 80 MPH now there is no guarantee that you will be able to throw 86-88 MPH by your senior year. Remember the simple formula of:

   [b]Force = mass X acceleration[/b]

What are you doing to increase your mass and acceleration? Do you keep track of your body weight and body fat? Do you lift weights? Do you work with plyometrics? Are you throwing weighted balls? All of these factors will answer the question of whether you’ll reach 90 MPH by the time you are a senior. Check out this website and look at all the workouts available. Do not waste time, you have a great start!

ds15 is right —> 80 mph is very good for a sophmore.

I agree, 80 mph is very good for a sophomore. There were 2 kids last year that were sophomores that threw around 80 in my school. 1 pitched varsity and the other had good enuf stuff to pitch varsity, but wasn’t mentally ready. Just remember you need more than a fastball.

I had a kid that threw 82 as a sophmore and now throws 92 as a senior and is gong to go high in the draft. He has signed a letter wth fsu. He is the absolute exception to the rule. Its like this, location, movement, change of speeds. All pitchers need some velocity. High draft picks will often have exceptional velocity, but there are tons of college pitchers out there that throw 83-87. There are many pros, minors to majors that throw 85-88. They have learned to master all parts of pithcing, and many still get pounded by the great hitters out there. There is so much more to pitching than throwing.

Coachric

I saw this thread and thought I would ask an additional associated question.

What would the “acceptable” velocity range for a freshman be?

Thanks.

Depends, what else have you got? How deceptive are you? What arm do you throw with? Does Mike Meyers throw at an acceptable ML velocity? I’ve always thought the hitters would let you know if you were throwing at an acceptable velocity :smiley:

I am actually talking about my son. He throws a fastball, changeup, and a knuckle curve.

He was only throwing a fastball and changeup until last fall. He started to incorporate a knucke curve in at that point.

His changeup is deceptive (not enough though), but he has tended to lean on the fastball because he has been able to get away with it for the first time through the order. Then if they start hitting him, he introduces the changeup. Like I said, it is not the best in the world, but it is enough of a threat that it makes the fastball better from that point.

I guess what I am asking is what type of velocity does a freshman need to get noticed for the fastball.

Between 65-75 mph and the ability to throw strikes. In High school control is far more important than velocity. J.V. typical is 70-80 mph with better control than Freshmen. Varsity is 75-85 with good control of an offspeed and the ability to get people out under pressure during district games being the most important.

Well he was clocked at 70 last year at the high school camp so that should have gotten better with added size and strength.

He through about 70% strikes last year, so control shouldn’t be an issue.

It seems that he should at least have a decent chance of making the team as a pitcher.

Thanks.

as a grade 9 I threw 74-76 hitting the strike zone 9 out of ten times. This season as a grade 10 I hope to consistantly hit 80 by midseason. I also throw a low to mid 60s curve and and cutter.

[quote=“CoachKreber”]80 MPH is slightly above average for a sophomore in HS. It is definitely above the normal curve and I would be pretty happy to see you in my pitching staff. More important than the 80 MPH is how the force is generated. Being a sophomore, you have to be around 15-16 years old. You are either pretty strong or have good arm action. We have a sophomore who throws 80 MPH and weighs 129lbs. He has great arm action, but does not have the body to use in fully yet. Will he ever get it? That is the big question and one that may be facing you. If you throw 80 MPH now there is no guarantee that you will be able to throw 86-88 MPH by your senior year. Remember the simple formula of:

   [b]Force = mass X acceleration[/b]

What are you doing to increase your mass and acceleration? Do you keep track of your body weight and body fat? Do you lift weights? Do you work with plyometrics? Are you throwing weighted balls? All of these factors will answer the question of whether you’ll reach 90 MPH by the time you are a senior. Check out this website and look at all the workouts available. Do not waste time, you have a great start![/quote]

Coach, Why do so many people miss this boat? The number of kids who “hit the wall” due to lack of strength period in one form or another is incredible. Whats worse is so many of these kids have decent pitching instruction as it relates to mechanics but their instructors are way behind the curve on strength. Many of these guys pitched many years ago when getting stronger and more powerful was “taboo” for a pitcher. So many people automatically link lifting weights with excess bulk. Many people who post on this very board would fare better in the long run if they took Mike Griffens posts to heart.