High school and College; Wooden or Alluminum?

Sorry that I have been away for a while, I’ve been pretty busy with school. Anyways a well debated question is if it should be mandatory for players in high school and college to use wooden instead of aluminum. Just to put it out there in my league in Canada we have to use wooden bats for some reason (I’m 16). What do you guys think?

This thread is going to be huge the discussion happened before. Honestly I would love to see wood happen in high school and college but…the tree hugger, no offense to anyone, wouldn’t be happy and put up a huge stink. Not that I give a hoot about them becuase I don’t it would also be costly to teams at the younger levels. I think they should get new regulations and make wooden bats that don’t break maby a composite type bat or something that we can play with. But I don’t think it would happen becuase it would cost so much money.

Gee I got a great idea: Make aluminum bats that perform like wood bats. Or in other words, take out the “pop”. Of course, how are they suppose to make money with a bat that sucks right?

college i can see, but high school no way.

Prior to the 1970’s, wooden bat were standard issue for all clubs, regardless of the age and level.

However, into the 70’s and beyond the game suffered a considerabl lack of interest with other sport taking away the attention span of youth… and hence the coaching population along with it.

Cultural changes also played a major role. This is the case with sports like basketball and soccer leading the way.

So, the art of playing this game -baseball, and all the associated talent that went along with it, kind of went the way of the dodo. Even today, baseball is not a game of skill and talent as much as it is power. The small game is as unfamilar as a training technique as it is displayed in actual live time on the field.

I would say from T-ball all the way to high school varsity, baseball is a nice experience and nothing more. There are a exceptions to that statement… and those exceptions are the gifted and devoted - not the population pool as a whole.

It’s no wonder that use and skill of using wooden bats has gone bey-bey. In fact, from a pitching coach’s standpoint - I bank on it. It makes me look like a better coach than I really am, it makes my rotation harder to beat than they really are, and a turnover in batting coaches that can sometimes be higher that what it should be.

Case in point - we have here in Massachusetts a league that is rich in history as it is in tradition. It’s called the Cape Cod League. The players that compete in that league are from the college ranks and you’d think that the best-of-the-best … college wise, would have little or no problem with the lumber… WRONG! It’s not surpirsing to see a look on these kid’s faces when their swinging wooden bats for the first time in a long time - if ever. I’ve attended my fair share of these games from Bourne to Falmouth to Chatham … and it’s always the same – “welcome to baseball son… yep, that’s a wooden bat… not as easy as it looks is it!??”

Wooden bats will not make it’s way into the sub-college level, nor will it make its way into the high school level any time soon if at all. The coaching poplulation isn’t there to coach it, the player poplulation isn’t there with the desire and will to learn it, nor is the community there that once had baseball as a right-of-passage for its youngsters. Basketball and soccer have taken the lead that will never be overtaken by baseball.

But, with every situation there are apportunities – and big opportunities. When ever I’m around a ballpark with a group of youngsters playing ball… any kind of ball, and I hear that certain “knock” that only a wooden bat gives… I take notice. And so does EVERY scout … every scout. And since the youth poplulation for baseball is an ever smaller and smaller pool of players … it just goes to figure the more someone stands out – all the better.

If your really serious about playing this sport, learn by teaching yourself about using a wooden bat. In fact if anyone has any interest in selecting and holding and practicing with wood… SAY SO … and I’ll post some “old school” for you.

Coach B.

in a babe ruth game i was playing last week, a kid from the opposing team got up with a wood bat. he was the best hitter ive ever seen with that lumber. he sat back on a nasty cuve and banged it off the fence in right for a double. then i asked him why he was using the wood and hes like its alot more fun than metal to hit with, it provides a challenge.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Prior to the 1970’s, wooden bat were standard issue for all clubs, regardless of the age and level.

However, into the 70’s and beyond the game suffered a considerabl lack of interest with other sport taking away the attention span of youth… and hence the coaching population along with it.

Cultural changes also played a major role. This is the case with sports like basketball and soccer leading the way.

So, the art of playing this game -baseball, and all the associated talent that went along with it, kind of went the way of the dodo. Even today, baseball is not a game of skill and talent as much as it is power. The small game is as unfamilar as a training technique as it is displayed in actual live time on the field.

I would say from T-ball all the way to high school varsity, baseball is a nice experience and nothing more. There are a exceptions to that statement… and those exceptions are the gifted and devoted - not the population pool as a whole.

It’s no wonder that use and skill of using wooden bats has gone bey-bey. In fact, from a pitching coach’s standpoint - I bank on it. It makes me look like a better coach than I really am, it makes my rotation harder to beat than they really are, and a turnover in batting coaches that can sometimes be higher that what it should be.

Case in point - we have here in Massachusetts a league that is rich in history as it is in tradition. It’s called the Cape Cod League. The players that compete in that league are from the college ranks and you’d think that the best-of-the-best … college wise, would have little or no problem with the lumber… WRONG! It’s not surpirsing to see a look on these kid’s faces when their swinging wooden bats for the first time in a long time - if ever. I’ve attended my fair share of these games from Bourne to Falmouth to Chatham … and it’s always the same – “welcome to baseball son… yep, that’s a wooden bat… not as easy as it looks is it!??”

Wooden bats will not make it’s way into the sub-college level, nor will it make its way into the high school level any time soon if at all. The coaching poplulation isn’t there to coach it, the player poplulation isn’t there with the desire and will to learn it, nor is the community there that once had baseball as a right-of-passage for its youngsters. Basketball and soccer have taken the lead that will never be overtaken by baseball.

But, with every situation there are apportunities – and big opportunities. When ever I’m around a ballpark with a group of youngsters playing ball… any kind of ball, and I hear that certain “knock” that only a wooden bat gives… I take notice. And so does EVERY scout … every scout. And since the youth poplulation for baseball is an ever smaller and smaller pool of players … it just goes to figure the more someone stands out – all the better.

If your really serious about playing this sport, learn by teaching yourself about using a wooden bat. In fact if anyone has any interest in selecting and holding and practicing with wood… SAY SO … and I’ll post some “old school” for you.

Coach B.[/quote]

Not true, especially in canada. At the higher levels of youth is has turned inot wood such as the Canada Cup, Western Canada summer games, the provincial summer games. And if you think just because its in canada it doesn’t matter means you’re being a little ignorant. THe canada cup used to be u18 untill MLB and colleges in the states complained that recruiting them at 18 was too late and they wanted to get a bead on upcoming players earlier, hence why it’s u17 now… Or atleast thats what Team Alberta’s head coach told us.

And if you think just because its in canada it doesn’t matter means you’re being a little ignorant.

Some how I missed the part where I said or gave you the impression that " …if I think just becasue its in Canada it doesn’t matter means I’m being little ignorant…"

But your absolutely correct about everything else that you said. Fact is, I don’t live in Canada, have intentions of living in Canada, I have not knowledge of Canada’s baseball programs or its talent, never trained or competed with anybody in Canada…

Therefore my remarks couldn’t have possibly been directed, assumed, centered, topical or subjected to or for, with and without, any knowledge of your country and its level of interest on the subject.

And with respect to your other comments about the upper levels, if you look back in time about the history of your country’s baseball past and the youth movement in it… you won’t find my remarks all that off center.
But again, that’s just my assumption… not knowing all that much about Canada’s programs, Ireland, China, or other domains.

By the way… what kind of bats are used during the regular playing season with your club?

Coach B.

You also look at the uprising of baseball players around here. In Alberta more kids are playing baseball now than 5 or 10 years ago, more competitive ball is reaching rural areas.

In our league you can use whichever you like. The guys who are hte better players usually do use wood though, and I know from baseball camps some of the team alberta guys and guys that have gone on to ncaa ball last couple of years use wood in the AAA league. Unfortunately for me and a few other kids who live in my area wee are a very large distance away from the closest midget AAA team.