High Cocked Position

My arm isn’t usually vertical to the ground at foot plant. Is this a problem? Ive noticed that roy oswalts arm action is quite similar. If this is a problem, how can I fix it? Are there any drills I can do?

[quote=“joba62”]My arm isn’t usually vertical to the ground at foot plant. Is this a problem? Ive noticed that roy oswalts arm action is quite similar. If this is a problem, how can I fix it? Are there any drills I can do?

[/quote]how is it? horizontal? if thats it then its just a timing issue, you’d arm is just behind your body probably forcing you to throw inconsistantly with strikes??

[quote=“tannerlorenz”][quote=“joba62”]My arm isn’t usually vertical to the ground at foot plant. Is this a problem? Ive noticed that roy oswalts arm action is quite similar. If this is a problem, how can I fix it? Are there any drills I can do?

[/quote]how is it? horizontal? if thats it then its just a timing issue, you’d arm is just behind your body probably forcing you to throw inconsistantly with strikes??[/quote]

Its looks a lot like how Oswalt does in that picture.

[quote=“joba62”][quote=“tannerlorenz”][quote=“joba62”]My arm isn’t usually vertical to the ground at foot plant. Is this a problem? Ive noticed that roy oswalts arm action is quite similar. If this is a problem, how can I fix it? Are there any drills I can do?

[/quote]how is it? horizontal? if thats it then its just a timing issue, you’d arm is just behind your body probably forcing you to throw inconsistantly with strikes??[/quote]

Its looks a lot like how Oswalt does in that picture.[/quote]theres nothing wrong with that… :?

I agree.

I agree.[/quote]

I thought this was a rushing problem.

When a guy has a rushing problem, his forearm would be horizontal and pointing toward 3B (for a RHP) when his glove side foot lands.

Kind of like this…

When a guy has a rushing problem, his forearm would be horizontal and pointing toward 3B (for a RHP) when his glove side foot lands.

Kind of like this…

[/quote]

Oh ok I gotcha.

When the front foot lands? Or when the shoulders start to rotate? Hip rotation happens between those two events and to keep the throwing arm up in the cocked position through hip rotation and shoulder rotation to the start of external rotation would introduce a delay that would decrease the effectiveness of the SSC.

Technically it’s when the shoulders start to rotate, but 90 percent of the time the shoulders start to rotate when the front foot lands.

How is keeping your arm up decreasing the SSC. If you go back into exteranl rotation then the SSC kicks in because now it has to go back in the opposite direction. If you hold your arm vertical there is no stretch. Also if thats the case then why do guys like Freddy Garcia throw 92-94 or even Carolos Zambrano. Those are two guys i think that get there arms up early into the high cocked and seem to hold it there for a second. Mostly Freddy Garcia.

Plus, the real benefit of the SSC is in the large muscles of the core, not the small muscles of the rotator cuff.

The job of the muscles of the rotator cuff and arm is mostly to hold the arm together during the throw. Most of the force comes from the stride (c. 20%) and the rotation of the hips ahead of the shoulders (c. 80%).

What’s SSC?

If the arm enters external rotation “on the move” then it carries its momentum into external rotation and that momentum helps maximize the stretch of the SSC. If, on the other hand, the arm gets to starting point of external rotation and camps out there for a while, then it enters external rotation from a static position with no starting momentum.

Stretch-shortening cycle. It has to do with the elastic properties of connective tissues.

Roger are we talking about going into external rotation, or are we talking about getting into the high cocked position. If you go into exteranl rotation then yes you never really get that SSC. But if you just put your arm at 90 degrees and hold it vertical there is no stretch and I dont see anything wrong with that. Its when that first stretch happens when it lays back is when it kicks in.

Chris you make a valide point on it being the larger muscle groups that play a role on SSC, but when your arm goes to lay back into external rotation the only option it has is to come forward so the SSC is being utilized there. It’s being stretched so then it needs to contract.

But the muscles that are being stretched – the muscles on the front side of the rotator cuff – are relatively quite small.

I understand what your saying Chris, but the subscapularius has to fire to come back forward, along with the pec, pec minor and lats and deltoids and (serratus anterior stabalizing the scapula), assisting in the movement. The subscapularius is a very strong muscle for its size, and it’s first to get utilized in the SSC when it goes to accelerate, because its the most on stretch muscle when the arm is in external rotation.

I was talking about going into external rotation but I suppose we could be talking about getting into “the high cocked position” too if that includes scap loading. My point was that the stretch can be maximized by using the momentum of a moving arm as long as the timing is there. This would be true for both external rotation as well as scap loading.

I agree with you now Roger. That momentum will help the SSC.You made it seem like before that pitchers who get to the high cocked position too soon automaticaly try and put there arm into external rotation. Atleast thats what I had got from it.