Help on 11 yrs Sidearm/underarm-slow motion video

My son just turned to 11 year old. He is lefty and tall (5’6). He pitches sidearm or underarm. when he pitches underarm, he gains the speed and lost the accuracy. When he pitched side arm (he keeps his shoulder level), he has more control on the ball.

I have couple concerns on his mechanics. His throw also follow the same pattern. any suggestion?

  1. Land heel
  2. Hip move aside / back foot move
  3. Shoulder tile

Let him stay with the sidearm delivery. Accuracy—control—is really more important at this stage of the game than velocity; the latter will come in time. 8)

is he real side arm or under arm? different coach give me different stories.

any suggestion on his mechanics?

Different coaches have different ideas, and it’s rare than any two will agree. I say, whatever the kid’s natural arm angle is, let him stay with it and don’t let anyone try to change it. If he’s doing what works for him, that’s all that counts. 8)

any suggestion on his mechanics is welcome.

It appears to me that he is taking his back foot off the ground too early,
or sort of dragging his back foot.
To me, it looks like his back leg is collapsing.
I think if you can correct that and help him stabilize his back foot and leg
he would be able to easily gain more velocity.

It appears to me that he is taking his back foot off the ground too early,
or sort of dragging his back foot.
To me, it looks like his back leg is collapsing.
I think if you can correct that and help him stabilize his back foot and leg
he would be able to easily gain more velocity.

Sorry about the double post- my computer was being slow
so I pressed “submit” again without realizing it had already posted it once.

what drill can help on it?

  1. Rocker Drill - Stand with back foot positioned like it’s still against the rubber and front foot planted after stride. Bend the knees a bit. Position arms in opposite and equal position. Rock back and forth (to simulate motion towards the target) a couple times and then throw to partner making the transition to “swivel and stabilize”. Keep the back foot on the ground. Purpose is to practice upper body mechanics - opposite and equal, swivel and stabilize, hip and shoulder separation, posture stabilization. Isolates the upper half but not as much as knee drill.

This drill may or may not help. As is says, its purpose is to practice upper body mechanics. If you keep the back foot on the ground and do the drill right, it should help with stabilization (upper body and lower).

The back leg stabilizes while the back knee flexes, firms up, and loads (isometrically) during front leg lift.