Help Me With My Mechanics... here is a video

a video of me pitching any suggestion please tell me…

sorry for my obnoxious friends in the video…

I’m not an expert on this so i’ll leave the big details to the experts, but my first reaction on seeing it is that you are way too upright for my liking.

How long is your stride?
Most pitchers have a stride that is 90%-110% of their height.

And like TropicalJoel said, you are very upright. You don’t seem to get any hip/shoulder separation (delayed shoulder rotation leads to H/S separation)

I do not see an equal and opposite position.
It LOOKS like your glove is in front of your chest when your throwing arm is extended back when you have strided out. They should semi mirror each other in a balanced way (stick that glove out and keep it over your foot.)

This isn’t 100% expert testimony and the camera quality and fps isn’t very good. Just what I think.

your stride is waaay to short :shock:

his stride is way too short because he doesn’t get any momentum going towards the plate. In other words his hips never even really get started. Get them moving before you hit your balance point on the leg lift.

[quote=“Spencer”]How long is your stride?
Most pitchers have a stride that is 90%-110% of their height.

And like TropicalJoel said, you are very upright. You don’t seem to get any hip/shoulder separation (delayed shoulder rotation leads to H/S separation)

I do not see an equal and opposite position.
It LOOKS like your glove is in front of your chest when your throwing arm is extended back when you have strided out. They should semi mirror each other in a balanced way (stick that glove out and keep it over your foot.)

This isn’t 100% expert testimony and the camera quality and fps isn’t very good. Just what I think.[/quote]

yea your right about the stride i dont know why when i practice at home i get it at 110-120% but for sum reason on the mound i forget it i guess it hasnt become second nature to me, it was also flat ground but yea… and also about the shoulder i have been told by my pitching coach in venezuela (who isnt just a nobody 5 pitchers of the camp were signed under him to non drafted free agents and are now playing class A, AA etc) he told me that when i do strech the arm with the glove that i tend to open up so i have been told to lead with the elbow instead of the completely extended arm but i get what you were trying to say i dont understand the hip/shoulder separation can you explain that better?

I wouldn’t be too sure about what your pitching coach is saying. Granted I don’t have a background of professional experience nor have I researched if this mechanic shows up in professional pitchers themselves.

I think something else is causing you to be off balance when you release the ball and not your glove side arm. That’s just me.

[quote=“newstarprospect08”]
… i don’t understand the hip/shoulder separation can you explain that better?[/quote]

Chris O’Leary explains (or shows) what hip/shoulder separation is on his website.
http://chrisoleary.com/projects/Baseball/Pitching/Examples/HipsRotatingBeforeShoulders.html
As to how to achieve maximum hip/shoulder separation, do some drills like mirror drills that focus on maximizing the separation.

DO NOT DO DRILL IN MIRROR. The reason is hip/shoulder seperation is a cause and effect situation. The cause is staying closed till landing without opening the shoulders. Also by having a long stride and good timing. THe effect is when staying closed you maximize your hip/shoulder seperation.

Drill like that will not create more hip/shoulder seperation that you can take to the mound. You have to be on a mound and focus on staying closed to get the true effect of hip/shoulder seperation.

Focus on keeping the shoulder to the batters hip longer that might help.

[quote=“RIstar”]DO NOT DO DRILL IN MIRROR. The reason is hip/shoulder seperation is a cause and effect situation. The cause is staying closed till landing without opening the shoulders. Also by having a long stride and good timing. THe effect is when staying closed you maximize your hip/shoulder seperation.

Drill like that will not create more hip/shoulder seperation that you can take to the mound. You have to be on a mound and focus on staying closed to get the true effect of hip/shoulder seperation.

Focus on keeping the shoulder to the batters hip longer that might help.[/quote]

That is entirely true. I was suggesting the mirror drill as a way to feel the separation. It is true when you speed things up, the real motion won’t be the same.

i have never heard about hip shoulder separation before but thank you it will be very helpful, when i perfect it i will post another video :smiley:

The amount of hip and shoulder separation a pitcher achieves is dependent on his mechanics and timing and also on his flexibility. As was pointed out, the mirror drill is a “position” drill that puts a pitcher into that position so that he can get used to what it feels like. Nothing wrong with that. The mirror drill is also one way to work on flexibility. Nothing wrong with that either. Remember that a drill is just one tool of many in the toolkit.

is hip shoulder separation a white or black idea where the more separation you get the better or it has to come more natural and at whatever time it comes is good?

The amount of separation differs from pitcher to pitcher based on flexibility though it can be inappropriately limited by improper timing and poor mechanics. Proper timing of one’s mechanics is crucial.

your stride is really short. you need to use your legs.

Ok, took a look at the video and you’re definitely a “stay back” guy. You stand very upright, lift your knee straight up, lower it back down, and then start forward. This builds no momentum. The result is your stride is short and you create no energy from your lower half. You end up throwing with mostly just your arm.

I would suggest you try to start your hips moving sideways toward the target sooner - when your knee reaches the peak of the knee lift - instead of waiting until it is on its way back down. Think of pushing the hips sideways. The head and shoulders should stay slightly behind the front hip into foot plant. Once you’ve made this adjustment, you can work on moving faster and even sooner.